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VOL. 33 



MAY 1942 



No. 2 



East Carolina Teachers College 



BULLETIN 




CATALOGUE NUMBER 
1942-1943 



GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

IS AN ACCREDITED MEMBER OF 

The American Association of Teachers Colleges 

The Southern Association of Colleges and 

Secondary Schools 

and 

The North Carolina College Conference 



Vol. 33 MAY 1942 No. 2 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS 
COLLEGE BULLETIN 



CATALOGUE NUMBER 
1942-1943 



GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA 



Published four times each year — March, May, August and 
December. 

Entered as second-class matter March 16, 1936, at the post office 
at Greenville, N. C, under the act of Congress August 24, 1912. 



PRESSES OF 

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON COMPANY 

RALEIGH, N. C. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

Calendar 5 

Trustees 6 

Officers of Administration 7 

Faculty 8 

Standing Committees 14 

Special Notice to Students 15 

General Information 17 

Classified Enrollment 21 

Aims of the College 22 

College Buildings 24 

Publications and Organizations 27 

Placement Bureau 32 

Teachers Certificates 33 

Extension, Correspondence and Field Courses 36 

Summer Quarter 38 

Observation and Practice Teaching 38 

Freshman Registration 39 

Requirements for Admission 40 

Classification of Students 42 

Grades and Scholarship 43 

College Fees and Expenses 45 

Withdrawals, Refunds, Credits 46 

Requirements for Graduation 47 

Curricula Offered 48 

Requirements for the B.S. Degree 49 

Graduate Instruction 52 

Requirements for the Master's Degree 53 

Curricula and Curricula Requirements 56 

Courses of Instruction: 

Administration and Supervision 76 

Art Education 79 

Business Education 81 

Education 87 

English 96 

Foreign Languages 103 

Geography 108 

History 113 

Home Economics 118 

Industrial Arts 124 

Library Science 127 

Mathematics 127 

Music Education 133 

Applied Music: Individual Instruction 138 

Group Instruction 139 

Health and Physical Education 142 

Psychology 152 

Natural Science 155 

Sociology, Economics, Government 164 

Roster of Students 173 





1942 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

26 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 91011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 

6 6 7 8 9 1011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


1 

2 3 4 6 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 1011 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 




1943 






JANUARY 


APRIL 


JULY 


OCTOBER 




SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 910 

11 12 13 14 16 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 6 6 7 8 
10 11 12 13 14 16 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


FEBRUARY 


MAY 


AUGUST 


NOVEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 3031 


13 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10111213 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 26 26 27 

28 29 30 


MARCH 


JUNE 


SEPTEMBER 


DECEMBER 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


SMTWTFS 


12 3 4 5 6 
7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 1 


12 3 4 6 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 i 

27 28 29 30 1 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 1011 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 26 1 

26 27 28 29 30 1 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 91011 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 









CALENDAR 1942-1943 



June 


4 


June 


5 


June 


11 


July 


4 


July 


15 


July 


16 


July 


23 


Aug. 


22 


Sept. 


22- 


Sept. 


24 


Sept. 


25 


Oct. 


8 


Nov. 


25 


Nov. 


30 


Dec. 


18 


Jan. 


4 


Jan. 


5 


Jan. 


18 


Mar. 


13 


Mar. 


18. 


Mar, 


19 


April 


21 


May 


27 


May 


28 


June 


3 


June 


4 


June 


10 


July 


14 


July 


15 


July 


22 


Aug. 


27 



Summer Quarter, 1942 

Thursday — Registration for first term 
Friday — Class work begins 
Thursday — Last day to register 
Saturday — Holiday 
Wednesday — First term ends 
Thursday — Registration for second term 
Thursday — Last day to register 
Saturday — Summer school closes 

Fat.t, Quarter, 1942 

22-23 Tuesday and Wednesday — Freshman registration 
Thursday — Registration of upperclassmen 
Friday — Class work begins 
Thursday — Last day to register 
Wednesday, 12 M. — Thanksgiving holiday begins 
Monday, 8 : 00 A.M. — 'Class work resumed 
Friday, 12 M. — Fall quarter closes, Christmas recess 
begins 

Winter Quarter, 1943 

Monday — Registration and classification 

Tuesday, 8:00 A.M. — Class work begins 

Monday — Last day to register 

Saturday — Winter quarter closes, Spring recess begins 

Spring Quarter, 1943 

Thursday — Registration and classification 

Friday, 8:00 A.M. — Class work begins 

Thursday — Last day to register 

Thursday, 4:25 P.M. — Examinations close 

Friday to May 31, Monday — Commencement exercises 

Summer Quarter, 1943 

Thursday — Registration for first term 
Friday — Class work begins 
Thursday — Last day to register 
Wednesday — First term ends 
Thursday — Registration for second term 
Thursday — Last day to register 
Friday — Summer school closes 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 
GREENVILLE, N. C. 



Term 
Expires 



Hon. Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman ex officio Raleigh 

R. R. Taylor Greenville 1942 

F. C. Harding Greenville 1942 

J. Herbert Waldrop Greenville 1942 

Henry Clarke Bridgers Tiarboro 1942 

0. P. Makepeace. Sanford 1943 

Mrs. Charles M. Johnson Raleigh 1943 

J. K. Warren .Trenton 1943 

A. B. Andrews Raleigh 1943 

Mrs. John G. Dawson Kinston 1945 

Mrs. Charles S. Forbes Greenville 1945 

Dr. Paul Fitzgerald Greenville 1945 

Mrs. W. B. Murphy Snow Hill 1945 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 

Clyde A. Erwin 

State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Ex Officio Chairman 

Agnes W. Barrett, Secretary 
F. D. Duncan, Treasurer 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Clyde A. Erwin, Chairman F. C. Harding 

A. B. Andrews R. R. Taylor 



BUILDING COMMITTEE 

0. P. Makepeace Leon R. Meadows, Secretary 

Henry C. Bridgers 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



General Officers 

Leon R. Meadows, A.B., M.A., Ph.D President 

Howard J. McGinnis, B.S., M.A., Ph.D... Registrar, Admissions and 

Placement 

F. D. Duncan, B.S Treasurer 

Annie L. Moeton, A.B Dean of Women 

Herbert ReBakker, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. Dean of Men 
Frederick D. Brooks, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., 

M.D Resident Physician 

Junius H. Rose, A.B., M.A Director Laboratory Schools 

Felix A. Snider, B.S., M.S Librarian 



Assistant Officers 

Estelle McClees, A.B Alumni Secretary 

Agnes W. Barrett Secretary to the President 

Ola S. Ross Assistant Registrar 

Mattie Scovllle Secretary to the Registrar 

Ellen B. Bowen Secretary in Placement Bureau 

Mrs. Mildred Owens Cashier 

Rurus Johnson, B.S Bookkeeper 

Hazel Willis Secretary in Treasurer's Office 

Mrs. L. L. Rives, A.B Dining Hall Steward 

Mrs. Rose Harrell Dietitian 

Mrs. Nell C. Speare Assistant Dietitian 

Elizabeth Smith, A.B Assistant Dean of Women 

Ruth White, A.B Dormitory Counsellor 

Mary B. Cheatham, A.B Dormitory Counsellor 

Arley V. Moore Dormitory Housekeeper 

Stella Grogan, R.N Superintendent of Infirmary 

Mary R. Robertson, R.N Assistant Superintendent of Infirmary 

Margaret Sammon, A.B Assistant Librarian 

George E. Barber, B.S Engineer 

J. C. Cockrell Electrician 

Wm. H. McHenry, A.B., M.A.,.. Superintendent of Buildings and 

Grounds 

W. E. Boswell Superintendent of Laundry 

J. L. Williams Campus Policeman 



FACULTY 
1941-1942 



DEPARTMENT OF ADMINISTRATION- 
EDUCATION — PSYCHOLOGY 

E. L. HENDERSON, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Director Department of 
School. Administration 

A.B., University of Texas; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
CARL L. ADAMS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., Director Department of Edu- 
cation and Psychology 

A.B., Bethel College, Kentucky; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; post doc- 
torate study, Harvard Medical School. 

LUCILE CHARLTON, B.S., M.A 

University of Georgia, Normal Department; State Normal School, Athens, 
Georgia; B.S., M.A., George Peabody College. 

HUBERT C. HAYNES, A.B., LL.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., LL.B., M.A., Mercer University; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

HOWARD J. McGINNIS, B.S., M.A, Ph.D. 

Diploma, State Normal School, West Virginia; B.S., University of West Vir- 
ginia; M.A., University of Chicago; Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

JUNIUS H. ROSE, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University. 

DORA E. COATES, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., North Carolina College for Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University; graduate study, Northwestern University. 

ANNIE C. NEWELL, B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, State Normal School, Trenton, N. J.; B.S., M.A., Diploma in Kinder- 
garten, Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study: Cornell Uni- 
versity; Teachers College, Columbia University. 

FRANCES WAHL, B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas; B.S., George Peabody 
College; MA., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study, George 
Peabody College ; Northwestern University. 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

E. R. BROWNING, B.C.S., A.B., M.Ed., Director 

B.C.S., Bowling Green Business University; A.B., Marshall College; M.Ed., 
Duke University; graduate study, Colorado State College of Education. 

VELMA WOOLDRIDGE LOWE, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., MA., University of Tennessee. 

LENA C. ELLIS, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Bowling Green Business University; A.B., A.M., State Teachers College, 
Bowling Green, Kentucky. 

AUDREY VIRGINIA DEMPSEY, A.B., M.A. 

Woodbury, Los Angeles; Gregg, Chicago; A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of 
Education. 

ZITA BELLAMY, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., MA., John B. Stetson University; graduate study, University of Pitts- 
burgh. 



Faculty 



DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH 

ALICE LUCILE TURNER, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; graduate study: University of 
Chicago. 

MARY HEMPHILL GREENE, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Agnes Scott; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: University 
of Chicago, University of North Carolina. 

EMMA L. HOOPER, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Mississippi State College for Women ; M.A., University of Virginia ; 
graduate study: Northwestern University. 

MAMIE E. JENKINS, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Duke University; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: University 
of Wisconsin; Columbia University; University of Virginia. 

LOIS GRIGSBY, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Ohio Wesleyan University; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: 
University of Wisconsin. 

DENVER EWING BAUGHAN, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.A., M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Yale University. 
MEREDITH NEILL POSEY, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas. 

DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE 

RALPH C. DEAL, A.B., M.A., B.D., Director 

A.B., M.A., Davidson College; B.D., U.T. Seminary; graduate study: New 
York University. 

MARGUERITE ZELLE AUSTIN, B.A., M.A. 
B.A., Winthrop College; M.A., Duke University. 

DEPARTMENT OF GEOGRAPHY 

P. W. PICKLESIMER, B.Ped., B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.Ped., Berea College; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College. 
JAMES M. CUMMINGS, B.S., M.A. 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Memphis, Tennessee; B.S., M.A., George Pea- 
body College ; graduate study : State Teachers College, Greeley, Colorado. 

W. A. BROWNE, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., State Teachers College, Springfield, Mo.; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody 
College. 

DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY 

ARTHUR D. FRANK, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; Ph.D., Columbia University. 

E. C. HOLLAR, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Teachers College, Warrensburg, Missouri; M.A., University of Missouri; 
graduate study: George Peabody College. 

SALLIE JOYNER DAVIS 

Diploma, North Carolina College for Women; three years graduate study: Duke 
University; University of Pennsylvania; University of California. 



10 East Carolina Teachers College 

LAURA T. ROSE, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Gustavus Adolphus College; MA., Columbia University; graduate study: 
University of Wisconsin ; Columbia University. 

ROBERT LEROY HILLDRUP, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., Southwestern College, Kansas; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

DEPARTMENT OF HOME ECONOMICS 

KATHARINE HOLTZCLAW, B.S., M.A., Director 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College; graduate study: University of Chicago, 
New York University. 

ADELAIDE E. BLOXTON, B.S., M.S. 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., Columbia University; graduate study: 
University of North Carolina. 

MABEL LACY, A.B., B.S., M.A. 

A.B., Milligan College; B.S., Teachers College, Johnson City, Tennessee; M.A., 
University of Tennessee. 

ETHEL R. WAITERS, B.S., M.S. 

George Peabody College for Teachers; B. S., Union University; M.S., Iowa 
State College. 

PEARL CHAPMAN, B.S., M.A. 

University of Minnesota; University of Missouri; B.S., Kirksville State Teach- 
ers College ; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

MARGARET SELLMAN, S.B., M.A. 

S.B., Northwestern University; M.A., Columbia University. 

LOTTIE SIMMONS, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College; M.A., Columbia University; Bethany College; 
East Carolina Teachers College; Yale University. 

DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

HERBERT REBARKER, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College. 

MARIA D. GRAHAM, L.I., B.S., M.A. 

L.I., George Peabody College; B.S., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

LOUISE WILLIAMS, B.A., M.A. 

B.A., Kentucky Wesleyan; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; grad- 
uate study : Teachers College, Columbia University. 

ELIZABETH ENGLAND, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

A. L. DITTMER, A.B., M.A., Director 

A.B., University of Utah; M.A., Columbia University; graduate study: East- 
man School of Music. 

LOIS V. GORRELL, Certificate 

Teachers Certificate, Peabody Conservatory of Music; further study at New 
England Conservatory; Eastman School of Music; Chautauqua, N. Y. ; 
Peabody Conservatory, Paris, France. 

GUSSIE KUYKENDALL, B.S. 

B.S., George Peabody College; graduate study: Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 



Faculty 1 1 



DENTON ROSSELL, A.B., M.A. 

Mount Vernon Junior College; A.B., University of Washington; M.A., Colum- 
bia University. 

HAZEL ELSOM, B.M., MA. 

B.M., Eastern School of Music, University of Rochester, N. J.; M.A., Teachers 
College, Columbia University; graduate study: Northwestern University. 

ROBERT GETCHELL, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Iowa State Teachers College; M.A., Eastman School of Music. 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL 
EDUCATION 

FREDERICK P. BROOKS, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., M.D., Director 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of North Carolina; M.D., University of Michigan. 

OSCAR A. HANKNER, B.S., M.S. 

B.S., M.S., University of Illinois; graduate study: New York University. 

JOHN B. CHRISTENBURY, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Davidson College; M.A., Columbia University. 

DOROTHY PARKS, B.S., M.A. 

B.S., Florida State College for Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

E. B. AYCOCK, A.B., M.D., CM. 

A.B., University of North Carolina ; M.D., CM., McGill University. 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SCHOOL ART 

KATE W. LEWIS, Director 

Diploma, Peace Institute; University of Virginia; State Normal School, Hyannis, 
Mass. ; Chautauqua Art School ; Snow-Froeblich School of Industrial Art, 
Chicago ; School of Fine and Applied Arts, New York. 

WILLIAM H. McHENRY, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., Lincoln Memorial University; M.A., George Peabody College. 

MADELON POWERS, A.B., M.A. 

A.B., State Teachers College, Minnesota; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE 

RONALD J. SLAY, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Director 

B.S., University of Mississippi; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
CHARLES W. REYNOLDS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., Kentucky Wesleyan; M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
B. B. BRANDT, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.S., Mississippi State College; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

MARY HUMPHREYS, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., Western Maryland; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University. 

WILL SCOTT DeLOACH, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

A.B., M.A., Howard College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
CHRISTINE WILTON, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

B.S., University of Arkansas; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 



12 East Carolina Teachers College 



DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY AND ECONOMICS 

MARTIN L. WRIGHT, A.B., M.A., Director 

A.B., University of North. Carolina; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity; graduate study: University of Chicago, Columbia University. 

PAUL A. TOLL, A.B., MA., Ph.D. 

A.B., Wilmington College, Ohio ; M.A., Haverf ord College, Pa. ; Ph.D., Ohio 

State University. 

BEECHER FLANAGAN, B.Ped., B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

B.Ped., Berea College; B.S., M.A., Ph.D., George Peabody College; post doc- 
torate study: University of Texas. 

DEPARTMENT OF LIBRARY SCIENCE 

FELIX E. SNIDER, B.S., M.S., Director 

B.S., State Teachers College, Missouri; M.S., University of Illinois. 
ELLIOTT HARDAWAY, A.B., M.A., B.S., M.S. 

A.B., M.A., Vanderbilt University; B.S., M.S., University of Illinois. 

TRAINING SCHOOLS 
Campus Training School 

FRANCES WAHL, B.S., M.A., Principal 

Diploma, State Teachers College, Conway, Arkansas; B.S., George Peabody 
College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University; graduate study: 
George Peabody College; Northwestern University. 

ANNE L. REDWINE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, First Grade 

North Carolina College for Women: A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; 
M.A. and Supervisor's Diploma, Teachers College, Columbia University. 

RUTH FAISON, A.B., M.A, Critic Teacher, First Grade 

A.B., Woman's College of The University of North Carolina; graduate study: 
East Carolina Teachers College; M.A. and Supervisor's Diploma, Teachers 
College, Columbia. University. 

LUCY NULTON, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Second Grade 

B.S., George Peabody College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

CHRISTINE JOHNSTON, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Second Grade 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

EUNICE McGEE, A.B., M.A, Critic Teacher, Third Grade 

A.B., Piano Certificate, La Grange College, La Grange, Georgia; graduate study: 
George Peabody College, Emory University, University of Georgia, Colum- 
bia University; M.A., Oglethorpe University. 

MRS. J. L. SAVAGE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Third Grade 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

ALMA BROWNING, B.S., M.A., Crttio Teacher, Fourth Grade 

Normal Diploma, State Teachers College, Murfreesboro, Tenn. ; B.S., M.A., 
George Peabody College; graduate study: University of Iowa, George Pea- 
body College. 

LOUISE GALPHIN, A.B., M.Ed., Critic Teacher, Fourth Grade 
A.B., Winthrop College; M.Ed., Duke University. 



Faculty 13 

CLEO RAINWATER, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade 

Diploma, State Normal School, Athens, Ga. ; B.S., MA., George Peabody 
College; graduate study: University of Iowa. 

MARY ANN COBB, B.S., M.A., Critic Teacher, Fifth Grade 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

ELIZABETH HYMAN, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Seventh Grade 

A.B., North Carolina College for "Women; M.A., Teachers College, Columbia 
University. 

MAUDE KAVANAUGH, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Seventh Grade 

A.B., M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Greenville High School 

VESTER MOYE MULHOLLAND, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, English 

A.B., M.A., Duke University; graduate study: Duke University, University of 
North Carolina, Vanderbilt University, and Eastern Kentucky State Teachers 
College. 

LAURA MATTOCKS BELL, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Commerce 

A.B., M.A., Woman's College of The University of North Carolina, Columbia 
University. 

DEANIE BOONE HASKETT, A.B., MA., Critic Teacher, English 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

RICHARD G. WALSER, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, English 

A.B., Davidson College ; M.A., University of North Carolina ; Cambridge Uni- 
versity (England); graduate study: Duke University, University of North 
Carolina. 

ELLA COOPER BELL, A.B., M.S., Critic Teacher, Science 

A.B., Winthrop College; M.S., Emory University; graduate study: University 
of Michigan. 

H. H. CUNNINGHAM, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, History 

A.B., Atlantic Christian College; M.A., University of North Carolina. 

ALLIE ESTELLE GREENE, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Mathe- 
matics 

Columbia University, Vanderbilt University; A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers 
College. 

IMOGENE RIDDICK, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, French 

Diploma, Saint Mary's Junior College, Raleigh, N. C. ; A.B., Randolph-Macon 
"Woman's College; M.A., University of North Carolina, Sorbonne University, 
Paris. 

EVELYN BUCHANAN, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Mathematics 

A.B., M.A., Duke University. 

E. R. ROBINSON, A.B., M.A, Critic Teacher, Science 

A.B., Union College; M.A., Columbia University. 

ROLAND FARLEY, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Physical Education 

A.B., M.A., East Carolina Teachers College. 

NORMAN HINTON CAMERON, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Com- 
merce 

A.B., Elon College; M.A., University of Kentucky. 
ALICE STRAWN, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Home Economics 
A.B., College of Industrial Arts ; M. A., Columbia. 



14 East Carolina Teachers College 

MARY SHAW ROBESON, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, History 

A.B., East Carolina Teachers College; MA., University of North Carolina. 

ONA SHINDLER, A.B., M.A., Critic Teacher, Music 

A.B., De Paw University; M.A., New York University. 

SARA ELIZABETH HARRISON, B.S., Critic Teacher, Physical 
Education 

B.S., Woman's College of The University of North Carolina. 

VIRGINIA LOUISE SWANN, A.B., M.S., Critic Teacher, Home 

Economics 
A.B., State Teachers College, Kentucky; M.S., Iowa State College. 



STANDING COMMITTEES 
Committee Chairman 

Course of Study A. D. Frank 

Graduate study E. L. Henderson 

Schedule of courses R. J. Slay 

Placement of graduates Howard J. McGinn is 

Chapel programs Sallie Joyner Davis 

Library Felix E. Snider 

Educational field trips E. L. Henderson 

Men's athletics H. C. Haynes 

Women's athletics ..Dorothy Parks 

Student loan fund Maria D. Graham 

Scholarships and self-help Howard J. McGinnis 

High school day _ Carl L. Adams 

Classification and credits Alice Lucile Turner 

Homecoming Mrs. Adelaide E. Bloxton 

Standards in written composition Alice Lucile Turner 

Beautifying grounds Martin L. Wright 

Publicity Lois G. Grigsby 

Commencement Ronald J. Slay 

Entertainment Ola S. Ross 

Publications Howard J. McGinnis 

Alumni Emma L. Hooper 



SPECIAL NOTICE TO STUDENTS 

The catalogue of East Carolina Teachers College, issued in 
the spring of each year, is intended to give such a description of 
the work of the college and such a digest of its regulations as are 
needed by students. Although the courses announced and the 
regulations given are fairly continuous from year to year, neither 
of them is valid beyond the succeeding year, for before the end 



Special Notice 15 

of the succeeding year a new catalogue will have been issued, 
superseding all previous catalogues. 

Ordinarily a student may expect to be allowed to secure a 
diploma or a degree in accordance with the requirements of the 
curriculum laid down in the catalogue in force when he first 
entered the College (see regulations) or in any subsequent cata- 
logue published while he is a student ; but the faculty reserves the 
right to make changes in curricula and in regulations at any 
time when in its judgment such changes are for the best interests 
of the students and of the College. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



East Carolina Teachers College was established by an Act of 
the General Assembly, ratified the 8th day of March, 1907, under 
the name East Carolina Teachers Training School. The charter 
is found in Consolidated Statutes, chapter 96, amended by Extra 
Session 1920, 1921, and 1925, and as amended, is as follows: 

A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT TO CHARTER THE 
EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact: 

Section 5863. That the trustees of the East Carolina Teachers 
College, established by an act of the General Assembly of North Caro- 
lina of one thousand nine hundred and seven, and located at Green- 
ville, North Carolina, shall be and are hereby constituted a body 
corporate by and under the name and style of "The Board of Trustees 
of the East Carolina Teachers College," and by that name may sue 
and be sued, make contracts, acquire real and personal property by 
gift, purchase or devise, and exercise such other rights and privileges 
as are incident to corporations of like character as are necessary for 
the proper administration of said college. 

Sec 5864. That the said college shall be maintained by the State 
for the purpose of giving young white men and women such education 
and training as shall fit and qualify them to teach in the public 
schools of North Carolina. 

♦Chapter 320, sec. 1. That the trustees ... of East Carolina 
Teachers College ... be and they are hereby authorized and directed 
to fix the tuition fees ... in such amount or amounts as they may 
deem best, taking into consideration the nature of each department 
and the cost of equipment and maintaining the same : and are further 
instructed to charge and collect from each student, at the beginning of 
each semester, tuition fees and an amount sufficient to pay room rent, 
servants' hire and other expenses for the term ... it being the pur- 
pose of this act that all students in State institutions of higher learn- 
ing shall be required to pay tuition, and that free tuition be and the 
same is hereby abolished, except for such students as are physically 
disabled and who are so certified to by the Vocational Rehabilitation 
Division of the State Board of Vocational Education, who shall be 
entitled to free tuition. . . . 



* From Acts of 1933. 
2 



18 East Carolina Teachers College 

*Seo. 1. That the board of trustees of East Carolina Teachers College 
shall consist of twelve members to be appointed by the Governor and 
confirmed by the Senate and the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction as an ex officio chairman, making thirteen members of the 
board in all. Provided, that the twelve members appointed by the 
Governor and confirmed by the Senate each shall serve for a period 
of six years or until his successor has been appointed. Provided, 
further, that the first board under this act shall be appointed as 
follows: one member for two years, four for four years and four for 
six years. Provided, further, that the term of office shall begin July 
first of the calendar years ending in an odd number, i.e., July 1, 1929. 
Provided, further, that all of the members of the present board 
appointed prior to nineteen hundred and twenty-seven shall hold 
office to June thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twenty-nine. 

**Sec. 13. Each of the Directors, Trustees, managers or other 
persons whose appointments are herein provided for, shall hold office 
until his or her successor or successors have been appointed, and 
qualified according to law. 

***Sec. 2. That members of the board of trustees shall not be 
removed from office except upon complaint filed by the Chairman of 
the Board and the case heard before the Governor and the Council 
of State. Provided, that whenever a trustee shall fail to be present 
for one year at the regular meeting of the board, his place as trustee 
shall be deemed vacant and said vacancy shall be filled by the Gov- 
ernor subject to the approval of the Senate when it next convenes. 

Sec. 5867. That the board of trustees shall have power to prescribe 
the course of study and shall lay special emphasis on those subjects 
taught in the public schools of the State and on the art and science 
of teaching. 

Sec. 5868. The board of trustees shall make no rules that dis- 
criminate against one county in favor of another in the admission 
of pupils into said college. 

Sec. 5869. That when, in the judgment of the board of trustees, 
the best interest of the college will be promoted thereby the board 
may decline to admit young men into the rooms of the dormitories. 

Sec. 5870. That all rights and titles heretofore acquired in any 
way for the use and benefit of said college shall vest and remain 
in the said board of trustees as herein incorporated. 

Sec. 5871. That the trustees shall report biennially to the Gov- 
ernor before the meeting of each General Assembly, the operation 
and condition of said college. 



* Enacted by the General Assembly of 1925, amended by the General Assembly 
of 1927, and 1929. 

** Enacted by the General Assembly of 1925. 
*** Enacted by the General Assembly of 1929. 



General Information 19 

LOCATION 

The college is located in the City of Greenville, Pitt County, 
North Carolina. Greenville is at the junction of the Norfolk- 
Southern and the "Weldon-Kinston Branch of the Atlantic Coast 
Line. It is on state highways 11, 43, and U. S. highway 264. 

The plant of the College, at present, consists of a campus of 
approximately one hundred acres, on which there are twenty-two 
buildings appropriate to the work of the college. 

It is 86 miles east of Raleigh, on the Tar River, and 65 miles, 
air line, from the Atlantic coast. 

HISTORY 

The General Assembly passed an act authorizing the estab- 
lishment of the College March 8, 1907. 

Ground was broken for the first building July 2, 1908. 

The first regular session opened October 5, 1909. 

Only one-year and two-year curricula were offered. 

The first summer school was held May 24 to July 30, 1910. 

The first class was graduated from the two-year normal cur- 
riculum June 6, 1911. 

The College was authorized to offer a four-year curriculum 
and to grant the Bachelor of Arts degree November 20, 1920. 

The first degrees were conferred June 1922. 

The College was authorized to grant the Master of Arts degree 
August 22, 1929. 

The first Master of Arts degree was conferred in August, 1933. 

The College was authorized to offer a curriculum leading to 
the Bachelor of Science degree May 29, 1941. 



20 



East Carolina Teachers College 



ENROLLMENT 

October 5, 1909, the College opened its doors for students. 
Since that date students have been enrolled in residence as 
follows : 

Net 

Regular Names Enroll- 

School Year Summer Total Counted Twice ment 

1909-10 174 330 504 42 462 

1910-11 227 300 527 29 498 

1911-12 235 359 594 26 568 

1912-13 252 322 574 20 554 

1913-14 251 328 579 19 560 

1914-15 295 394 689 16 673 

1915-16 295 398 693 20 673 

1916-17 307 353 660 15 645 

1917-18 325 273 598 12 586 

1918-19 278 286 564 20 544 

1919-20 285 293 578 31 547 

1920-21 381 302 683 34 649 

1921-22 317 352 669 34 635 

1922-23 395 436 831 48 783 

1923-24 516 490 1,006 59 947 

1924-25 593 680 1,273 59 1,214 

1925-26 709 710 1,419 134 1,285 

1926-27 736 712 1,448 109 1,339 

1927-28 767 712 1,479 98 1,381 

1928-29 976 540 1,516 199 1,317 

1929-30 952 496 1,448 164 1,284 

1930-31 984 461 1,445 171 1,274 

1931-32 972 473 1,445 147 1,298 

1932-33 970 361 1,331 194 1,137 

1933-34 1,013 484 1,497 180 1,317 

1934-35 1,096 733 1,829 244 1,585 

1935-36 1,134 733 1,867 202 1,665 

1936-37 1,142 625 1,767 170 1,597 

1937-98 1,204 700 1,904 138 1,766 

1938-39 1,269 781 2,050 224 1,826 

1939-40 1,289 663 1,952 198 1,754 

1940-41 1,296 648 1,944 228 1,716 

1941-42 1,339 519 1,858 267 1,591 



The sum of the annual enrollments since the college first 
opened its doors is 35,838. 



General Information 21 

The number of A.B. graduates by calendar year is : 

1922 2 1932 116 

1923 5 1933 123 

1924 7 1934 Ill 

1925 19 1935 110 

1926 28 1936 143 

1927 38 1937 169 

1928 54 1938 226 

1929 82 1939 253 

1930 97 1940 325 

1931 _ 88 1941 291 

M.A. graduates in 1940 2 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

June 5, 1940 to June 5, 1941 

Freshmen 386 

Sophomores 295 

Juniors 307 

Seniors 438 

Unclassified 60 

Special 54 

Graduate 51 

Less Duplicates 267 

Total Different Students 1,591 

GROSS ENROLLMENT BY QUARTERS 

Summer 1941 

First term 452 

Second term 279 

Fall 1941-1942 1,240 

Winter 1941-1942 1,149 

Spring 1941-42 1,090 

Total enrollments 4,210 

Different students regular year 1,399 

Different students summer 1941 519 

Net enrollment 1,858 

Enrollment in Campus Training School — Elementary 441 

Enrollment in City Training School — Secondary 475 

Enrollment Training School 916 



22 East Carolina Teachers College 

AIM 

As is seen in the act of the General Assembly, section 5864, 
the object of the State in establishing and maintaining the 
College is to give "to young white men and women such educa- 
tion and training as shall fit and qualify them to teach in the 
public schools of North Carolina." 

The aim of the College is to teach its students not only subject- 
matter but also the processes by which the learning mind 
functions. Its purpose is to give the students : 

1. Such knowledge of the studies taught in the public 
schools as a teacher must have in order to teach them properly. 

2. A knowledge of other studies that are related to the 
branches taught in the public schools. 

3. A knowledge of the mental and physical powers of the 
child and their methods of development. 

4. A knowledge of the principles of education and methods 
of teaching. 

5. The practical application of these principles in the actual 
work of the schoolroom by practice teaching. 

6. A knowledge of the methods of organizing and managing 
schools. 

7. A knowledge of the school law of the State. 

In brief, this institution aims to prepare teachers, both theo- 
retically and practically, for teaching in the public schools of 
North Carolina. 

DISCIPLINE 

In conducting a college for young men and women who are 
about to assume the responsibilities of so serious and dignified 
a profession as teaching, there should be no occasion for arbi- 
trary and iron-clad rules. Each student should attend promptly 
and faithfully to every duty and have due consideration and 
regard for the rights and privileges of others. 

No rules are made by the College authorities except those 
necessary to govern routine work, but if the pupil is found to 
be falling behind in his studies, neglecting his duties or exerting 
an unwholesome influence, prompt steps are taken for his 
amendment. If a pupil does not show a disposition to conform 
to high standards of conduct he is not considered a good pro- 



Genebal Infobmation 23 

spective teacher; and if he is found unresponsive to instruction 
and counsel he is requested to withdraw from the College. The 
student is given the maximum of freedom commensurate with 
the orderly administration of such an educational institution as 
this. He is given every encouragement and ample opportunity 
to develope self-direction in modern cooperative society. 

In the spirit of the institution is found the discipline of the 
College. 

STUDENT GOVERNMENT 

To promote a sense of personal responsibility in the students 
of the College a Student Government Association has been 
inaugurated, subject to the approval of the president of the 
College and of an advisory board. This organization adopts 
such regulations as concern the entire student body. The asso- 
ciation has so administered its duties as to merit the approval 
of both faculty and students. 

HEALTH 

There is a central heating and lighting plant that provides 
steam heat and electric lights for all the buildings. A modern 
system of ventilation is installed. All those things necessary 
for sanitary conditions are of the best type procurable. The 
College gets its water from the city of Greenville. The city 
owns its waterworks and has the water examined frequently, 
thus insuring its purity. In short, the college life of each 
student is made as comfortable as can be, and every possible 
precaution for health is taken. 

The health conditions in the College from the first, have 
been entirely satisfactory. 

MEDICAL ATTENTION 

The college physician maintains an office in the infirmary. 
Regular clinics are held twice daily under the supervision of the 
physician and assistant physician, and medical services are 
available at all times on call by the infirmary supervisor. All 
students living in the dormitories and all day students who sub- 
scribe to the infirmary services by payment of the medical fee are 
admitted to the clinics and to the infirmary wards at the discre- 



24 East Carolina Teachers College 

tion of the physicians. Two resident nurses are in charge of the 
infirmary. A well equipped building adequately meets the needs 
of student health. 

Every student, following admission, is given a thorough physi- 
cal examination. Satisfactory evidence of successful smallpox 
vaccination is required of all students. It is expected that in so 
far as is possible corrective measures will be taken for the defects 
found. 

The infirmary supplies many common drugs without charge 
to the student and such services as the staff may render are with- 
out charge. Additional services (consultations, special nurses, 
operations, special drugs) recommended by the attending physi- 
cian and approved by the student's parent or guardian must be 
paid for by the student. 

THE COUNCIL ON STUDENT ADJUSTMENT 

The function of the Council on Student Adjustment is to con- 
fer with students who find it difficult to make the adjustments 
required in college life. Problems of all kinds are given con- 
sideration. All matters which are taken up in conferences with 
students are handled in a confidential and personal manner. 
Taking advantage of the assistance offered by the Council is 
not compulsory. 

STUDENTS OUTFIT 

Each student is expected to bring for her own use the follow- 
ing articles: Two pairs of single sheets, one pair of blankets, 
two counterpanes, two pillow-cases, six towels, covers for dresser 
and table, a spoon, and a glass. 

Only single beds are used. 

Note : The college laundry stamps each student's wash with 
a personal mark for identification. 

BUILDINGS 

Administration Building. This building was constructed 
in 1929-30, and is given over entirely to administrative offices. 
It contains the offices of the President, the Treasurer, the 
Registrar, and of the Placement Bureau. 



General Information 25 

Education Building. The building formerly occupied by 
the Science Department is now known as the Education Build- 
ing and is occupied entirely by the Department of Education. 

Austin Building. The Austin Building is the former Adminis- 
tration and Classroom building. It contains thirty classrooms, 
the stationery room, the book room, teachers' offices, music 
rooms, the office of the Alumni Association, and an auditorium 
where chapel exercises and other general assemblies of students 
are held. 

Robert H. Wright Building. The Bobert H. Wright Build- 
ing was named in honor of the first president of the college, 
who held the office for twenty-five years, and sponsored its 
construction. It contains a main auditorium, music rooms, and 
rooms for the physical education department. 

Classroom Building. The Classroom Building is one of the 
most beautiful buildings on the campus. It houses the depart- 
ments of Commerce, Geography, Home Economics, Science and 
Industrial Arts. This building is entirely modern in its archi- 
tecture, arrangement of rooms, offices and equipment. 

Home Management House. Prior to 1936 a portion of 
Jarvis Hall was used for practice purposes for the course in 
home management. In 1936, on the completion of the new 
infirmary, the building formerly occupied as an infirmary was 
converted into a home management house and has since been 
used for that purpose. It contains ten rooms which allows 
separate rooms for a group of seniors and an instructor, as 
well as ample space for entertaining. It also contains an apart- 
ment where a smaller group lives on a lower income level. 
The units of work on each level are run simultaneously. 

Laboratory School. The College has a well equipped school 
building on the campus for practice teaching purposes in the 
elementary grades. This school has an enrollment of over 500. 
For practice teaching in high school subjects, the College has a 
cooperative arrangement with the Greenville High School. 
This school has an enrollment of about 736. 

The Library. The Library, located on Wright Circle, was 
erected in 1927. It is a fireproof building and is used entirely 



26 East Carolina Teachers College 

for library purposes. The reading rooms will accommodate 200 
readers and the stack room has capacity for 65,000 volumes. 
The book collection numbers more than 37,000 volumes at pres- 
ent and is being added to at the rate of around 3,500 a year. 
More than 200 magazines and newspapers are received. Instruc- 
tion in the use of the Library is given all freshmen and the 
students are encouraged to take advantage of its facilities. 
Courses in Library Science are offered for teacher-librarians. 

Dormitories. The college is equipped with dormitory space 
to accommodate 838 students in four dormitories for women 
students as follows: 

Wilson Hall 190 students 

Jarvis Hall 171 students 

Fleming Hall 191 students 

Cotton Hall 286 students 

Each dormitory room is provided with two single iron beds 
with springs, mattress and pillows, two chairs, a table, a lavatory, 
a bureau, a wardrobe — all the necessary furniture for comfort- 
able living. 

Ragsdale Hall. Ragsdale Hall is a dormitory full equipped 
for the accommodation of women members of the faculty and 
other women employees of the college. Its equipment is similar 
to that of the dormitories for students. 

Men's Dormitory. The first floor of Ragsdale Hall has been 
converted into a dormitory for men. Thirty-five men students 
can be accommodated in these comfortable and well lighted 
quarters. 

Faculty Residences. On the campus are four residences 
which are rented to members of the faculty. 

Dining Hall. The dining hall is one of the most attractive 
buildings of the institution. The equipment in the kitchen is 
modern in every sense. For the preservation of meats, vegetables, 
and other foodstuffs, the College has a refrigerating plant of 
the best type. The dining hall is under the direction of a trained 
dietitian and each menu is made out with much care — the object 
being to provide for the student body the most wholesome food 
and to see that this food is prepared in the best way possible. 



General Information 27 

College Postoffice. The college postoffice is located in a 
wing of the dining hall. Students, faculty, and officers of the 
college may secure postoffice boxes for convenience in getting 
their mail. Regular mail deliveries from the downtown office 
are received at least twice a day and outgoing mail is taken up 
at the same time. 

The Laundry and Power Plant. The laundry and the power 
plant are under the same roof. The equipment here, as in the 
other buildings, is of the best possible type. The laundry has 
all the necessary equipment for efficient laundry work. 

The power plant supplies sufficient power for heating and 
lighting the College and for refrigeration. There are two sets 
of units, so that if one is out of commission the other may be 
used, thus preventing inconvenience, as well as saving wear 
and tear on machinery. 

COLLEGE PUBLICATIONS 

At least four regular bulletins are published by the college 
each year. The regular bulletins are the annual catalog, the 
summer school bulletin, and two others that deal with some 
phase of teacher training. Recent bulletins have dealt with The 
Campus Training School, A Handbook for Student Teachers, 
The Equipment of the Teacher, and Departmental Objectives. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Teco Echo, the college paper, is published twice a month 
by the students. It carries the usual college and alumni news, 
and is designed to furnish an outlet to student expression on 
all matters pertaining to their educational development. 

The Tecoan is the college annual. It is published by the 
students at the close of each regular school year. 

Pieces O'Eight, a quarterly magazine, is devoted to fiction, 
humor, and general student activities. 

ORGANIZATIONS 

It is the policy of the college to encourage campus organiza- 
tions that have for their purpose the building of character, per- 



28 East Carolina Teachers College 

sonality and scholarship. The following is a list of such organi- 
zations : 

Association for Childhood educa- International Relations Club 

tion Ki Pi Club (Dramatics) 
College Band Lanier Society- 
College Orchestra Mathematics Club 
Commerce Club Poe Society 
Commerce Sorority Science Club 
Debaters Club The Alumni Daughters and Sons 
Emerson Society Varsity Club 
English Club Verse Speaking Choir 
French Club (Phi Sigma) "Women's Athletic Association 
Glee Club Young Men's Christian Associa- 
Home Economics Club tion 

Young Women's Christian Association 

The Phi Sigma Chapter of the Sigma Pi Alpha 

The Robert H. Wright Chapter of the Future Teachers of America 

The Young Men's and Young "Women's Christian 
Associations 

The religious interests of the College are centered in the 
Young Men's and Young Women's Christian Associations. 
The Young "Women's association was organized in 1909 and the 
Young Men's in 1939; since that time both of the organiza- 
tions have done very effective work in promoting high ideals 
among the students. Regular devotional meetings are held to 
which all members of the student body and the members of the 
faculty are invited. 

The organizations have their own building for religious and 
social activities ; and they sponsor a reading room where students 
may come at their pleasure to read or study. 

Each year these associations send delegates to the Southern 
Student Conference held at Blue Ridge, North Carolina, where 
methods for bettering the coming year's work are studied. 

These associations render efficient aid in meeting new students 
and in the organization of the college at the opening of the 
fall quarter. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

On June 5, 1912, by the classes of 1911 and 1912, the Alumni 
Association of the College was organized, formulating as its 



General Information 29 

purposes — "to develop a spirit of cooperation among its mem- 
bers, to increase a spirit of loyalty to its Alma Mater and to 
promote the general welfare of the institution." A regular 
meeting of the Association is held on Alumni Day of each 
commencement. 

Alumni headquarters — one large room on the main floor 
of the Austin Building partitioned to include an office, a filing 
room, and a reception room — was provided and furnished by 
the Administration in February 1940; and then also a general 
fulltime secretary for the Association was employed by the 
cooperation of the Association and the College. 

Since its organization the Association has made several gifts 
to the College, among which are the memorials — the Kate R. 
Beckwith Gateway; the Austin Loan Fund; the "Wilson Me- 
morial ; and a contribution to the Robert H. Wright Loan Fund. 
In June 1940, the Association for the first time presented a 
symbolic alumni award to a graduate in recognition of achieve- 
ment. The first recipient was Miss Pattie Dowell, who was the 
first registrant and the first graduate of the College and who 
has achieved much in the field of teaching. By action of the 
executive board of the Association a symbolic award is to 
be presented annually. 

ATHLETICS 

Physical education, recreation and athletic facilities are 
provided for both men and women students. The Student Ath- 
letic Association sponsors both intra-mural and inter-collegiate 
athletics. Inter-collegiate athletic contests in football, basket- 
ball, baseball, tennis and boxing are scheduled for the men 
students. While athletics for men are relatively new in the 
College the men's teams have made gratifying progress during 
the past few years. Field hockey, soccer, volleyball, basketball, 
Softball and tennis clubs have been organized by the women 
students and contests are scheduled with outside institutions 
in many of these sports through play day programs. 

To be eligible for participation in inter-collegiate athletics 
a student must meet the minimum residence requirement of the 
college in credit courses carried per quarter. Twelve quarter 
hours is the minimum requirement for the current year. 



30 East Carolina Teachebs College 

The intra-mural sports program is being enlarged in scope 
each year to make "Sports for All" a reality. The intra-mural 
program for men includes the following sports : touch foot- 
ball, basketball, volley ball, tennis, archery, badminton, horse- 
shoes, table tennis, softball and track and field athletics. The 
following activities are on the intra-mural sports calendar for 
woman : field hockey, soccer, hiking, tennis, archery, basket- 
ball, softball, track and field athletics, volley ball, badminton, 
table tennis, paddle tennis, shuffle-board, deck tennis and 
bicycling. 

All students are encouraged to take part in a number of 
sports throughout the year. Biegular participation not only 
develops those qualities which make for a healthy and well 
rounded life, but also aids the student in gaining playing and 
teaching skills in a wide variety of sports which is an invaluable 
asset to every teacher. 

STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 

Since the founding of the College in 1909, graduating classes, 
alumni, organizations, and individual friends of the College 
have contributed toward loan funds for worthy students. 

The first gift toward a loan fund was made by the class of 
1911, the first class to be graduated from the College. For 
more than a decade, each succeeding class made a liberal con- 
tribution toward that fund which was called the "Students 
Loan Fund." The class of 1922 named their gift the "Wilson 
Loan Fund." The alumni established the "Beckwith Loan 
Fund" and the "Austin Loan Fund." The funds from the above 
sources now total $4,514.07. 

Other donors of loan funds together with present values of 
those loans are listed below: 

A. B. Andrews Loan Fund ..$ 5,356.05 

Beckwith Loan Fund 601.21 

Kiwanis Loan Fund 163.56 

Pitt County Loan Fund 2,830.07 

Masonic Theatre Loan Fund.... „ 404.95 

Wilson Loan Fund „ 1,622.04 

Saint Bernard Loan Fund 1,230.37 

Masonic Loan Fund 6,695.25 



General Information 31 

Students Loan Fund 1,618.53 

Knights Templar and Royal Arch Masons Loan Fund 1,286.23 

Abbott Loan Fund _ 2,621.91 

Robert H. Wright Loan Fund 6,140.08 

Austin Loan Fund 672.29 

General Loan Fund 3,276.17 



Total $34,518.71 

The Addie Fttlford Rodman Memorial Loan Fund, donated 
by Colonel W. B. Rodman in memory of his wife, yields ap- 
proximately $400 per year. This fund is in the custody of the 
State Department of Public Instruction. 

During the school year 1933-34 two new loan funds were 
started — one by the Pitt County Medical Society and the other 
by the Greenville Tobacco Market. These two funds continue 
to grow. 

Applications for Loans 

Applications will be considered by the Loan Fund Committee 
of the College when made by students on blanks furnished by 
the Treasurer. The funds are limited in amount and are loaned 
to students only for use in their junior and senior years and on 
the surety of two approved signatures. Application should be 
made at least two weeks before the beginning of the quarter 
for which the loan is desired. 

Nk> student may borrow more than the actual college expenses 
for any one quarter, and no student may borrow a total of 
more than $250.00 during his college career. 

Scholarship and student government records are considered 
in the awarding of loans. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Andrews Scholarship. An endowed scholarship, valued 
at $100.00 annually, and known as the Andrews Scholarship has 
been given by Mr. A. B. Andrews in memory of his wife, Helen 
Sharpies Andrews. 

U. D. C. Scholarships, (a) The Samuel S. Nash Schol- 
arship, $130.00 annually, is given by the Thirteenth District of 
the United Daughters of the Confederacy. 



32 East Carolina Teachers College 

(b) The Gen. James Johnston Pettigrew Scholarship, $130.00 
annually, is given by the North Carolina Division of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy. 

A number of working scholarships are available for students 
doing graduate work. 

Application for these should be made to the chairman of the 
committee on Graduate Instruction. 

GIFTS TO THE COLLEGE 

The two literary societies and the various graduating classes 
have left a large number of donations to the College. Among 
these gifts are oil portraits of the four men most closely asso- 
ciated with the establishment of the College, money with which 
to buy plants and shrubbery for the campus, books for the 
library, funds for interior decoration, and curtains for the 
stage. 

PLACEMENT BUREAU 

To the Placement Bureau of the College are referred all 
matters relating to the placement of its graduates. Any grad- 
uate of the College is eligible for free registration in the 
Bureau. 

The services of the Placement Bureau are available at all 
times to school officials, whether they wish the College to make 
recommendations or seek a frank, confidential opinion regard- 
ing graduates who have applied to them for teaching positions. 
In responding to a call for a teacher, the Bureau endeavors 
to recommend those who are best equipped and adapted by 
training, experience, and personality for the position in question. 

Since school employment officers often give preference in em- 
ployment to candidates who have training and skill in extra- 
curricular activities, it is advisable for students to develop 
during their years in college one or more useful skills outside 
their regular class work. Skill in music, glee club, piano, 
orchestra, physical education, basketball, playground activities, 
dramatics, debating, newspaper work, etc., assist in securing a 
good teaching position and in rendering a desired service to 
employers. Students should develop skill in at least one extra- 
curricular activity that will be of service to them as teachers. 



General Information 33 

They should choose the activities in which they have some 
natural ability. 

HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS CERTIFICATES 

These certificates will be issued on the basis of transcripts 
of college records which show that a required amount of pro- 
fessional credit and specialized work on major subjects has 
been earned. Graduation from college is required. 

Each applicant should meet the requirement in two or more 
teaching fields. Subjects for which certification is granted will 
appear on the certificate. 

The professional requirements on all high school teachers' 
certificates shall be 18 semester hours (27 quarter hours) as 
follows : 

1. Educational Psychology 2 sem. hrs. 

2. Principles of High School Teaching 

or 
Problems in Secondary Education 2 sem. hrs. 

3. Materials and Methods 2 sem. hrs. 

4. Observation and Directed Teaching 3 sem. hrs. 

5. Electives in Education 9 sem. hrs. 

The minimum subject matter requirements for the teaching 
of any subject, shall be: 

Semester Semester 

Hours Hours 

English 24 Science 30 

Mathematics 15 This shall include: Biology, 

Physical Education 30 Chemistry, Physics and Geog- 

Fine Arts 30 raphy or Zoology. 

Industrial Arts 30 Commerce 36 

French 18 This shall include Stenog- 

This is based on two units of raphy, Bookkeeping, Typewriting 

high school French, otherwise 24 and Office Management. 

semester hours is required. Public School Music 30 

Social Science 30 Credit for three semester hours 

a. American History 6 in Voice must be included. 

b. European History 6 Home Economics 51 

c. From Government, Geog- a. Chemistry 6 

raphy, Economics or So- b. Biology 6 

otology 9 c. Physics 2 

d. Electives (from a, b, c) 9 d. Art 3 

3 



34 



East Carolina Teachers College 



Semester Semester 

Hours Hours 

Individual certification will be e. Foods 8 

granted in any of the specific f. Clothing 8 

areas: history, government, geog- g. Management. 6 

raphy, economics and sociology, Home Management Resi- 
in which 12 semester hours credit dence required (6 weeks 
is presented. Certification for recommended as a mini- 
Citizenship or Civics or Problems mum). Other courses 
in American Democracy would may include buying, fur- 
require credit for at least 18 se- nishing, and housing. 

mester hours from government, h. Family 6 

economics, and sociology. Child Development (re- 
Latin 24 quired). 

Based on two units of high Family Relationships (re- 
school Latin, to be reduced 6 quired), 
semester hours for each addi- Other courses may in- 
tional unit of entrance credit. elude Health, Nursing 

and Hygiene. 
1. Social Science _ 6 

CERTIFICATES FOR TEACHING IN THE 
ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 

Before any certificate will be issued for teaching in the ele- 
mentary schools, the records from the institution in which the 
applicant received his training, must show that he has reached 
a satisfactory state of proficiency in spelling and penmanship. 
The certification will he made by the institution and will appear 
on the record. 

Grammar and primary certificates, class A, require of candi- 
dates, who do not hold a lower grade certificate, graduation from 
a standard four-year college or the equivalent, embracing not 
less than 120 semester hours. 

Primary and Grammar Grade A Certificate 

After September 1, 1941, the State Department of Certification 
will require of in-service teachers the satisfactory completion of 
the requirements for a degree from a standard college and the 
specific certificate requirements as qualifications for the primary 
and grammar class A certificate. 

Librarians 

Whole-time librarians as of 1941 must hold a degree from a 
standard four-year college, have met professional requirements 



General Ineobmation 35 

not less than those for the Class A Teacher's Certificate and 
shall have earned at least twenty-four semester hours of credit 
in Library Science taken in an accredited library school. This 
work shall include administration, cataloging and classification, 
reference, children's and adolescent literature. 

Teacher-librarians, that is, teachers who give a portion of 
their time to library work, shall have earned a degree in a 
standard four-year college, met professional requirements for 
the Class A Teacher's Certificate, and earned at least twelve 
semester hours in Library Science. This work shall include 
administration, reference, children's and adolescent literature. 

Health and Physical Education for Elementary and 
High School Teachers 

As of July 1, 1942, the following will constitute the require- 
ments in Health and Physical Education for elementary teachers 
and for teachers of those subjects in the high school: 

Elementary Teachers 

1. Principles of Health and Physical Education 2 S.H. 

2. Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for Ele- 
mentary Schools - 2 S.H. 

3. Practices and Procedures in Health for Elementary Schools 2 S.H. 
(Two semester hours of Biological Science are recommended as 
a prerequisite.) 

Part-time Teacher of Physical and Health Education and 

Coaches of Athletic Teams 15 S.H. 

This shall include: 

1. Principles, organization, administration, and supervision 

of Physical Education and Health 3-4 S.H. 

2. Physical Education skills and applied techniques 1 _ 8-9 S.H. 

a. Group games of low organization (games adaptable to 
adult groups and to children of elementary age). 

b. Dual and single games (tennis, handball, golf, badmin- 
ton, track, and field events, etc.). 

c. Group games of high organization (football, soccer, 
rugby, basketball, baseball, volley ball, speed ball, 
lacrosse, field hockey, etc.). 

d. Rhythms and dances. 

e. Gymnastics and stunts. 

f. Aquatics. 

3. Health Education, including the teaching of Health and 
school health problems. 3-4 S.H. 



36 East Carolina Teachers College 

Full-time Teacher of Health and Physical Education in the 

Junior and Senior High School 30 S.H. 

This shall include: 2 

1. Human anatomy and physiology 6 S.H. 

2. Principles, Organization, Administration, Supervision of 
Physical Education and Health Education 3-4 S.H. 

3. Physical Education skills and applied techniques 1 . ~ 12 S.H. 

a. Group games of low organization (games adaptable to 
adult groups and to children of elementary age). 

b. Dual and single games (tennis, handball, golf, bad- 
minton, track, and field events, etc.). 

c. Group games of high organization (football, soccer, rug- 
by, basketball, baseball, volley ball, speed ball, lacrosse, 

field hockey, etc.). 

d. Rhythms and dances. 

e. Gymnastics and stunts. 

f. Aquatics. 

4. Individual corrective physical education 2-3 S.H. 

5. Health Education: 

a. Methods and materials in Health Education. If Methods 
and Materials are used toward fulfilling the general 
education requirements, the additional work in the field 
of Health and Physical Education must be taken to ful- 
fill major requirements 2-3 S.H. 

b. Hygiene, including personal health, public health, child 
hygiene, and sanitation, immunology, and allied sub- 
jects 3-4 S.H. 

EXTENSION AND CORRESPONDENCE CREDIT 

A student is not allowed, except by special permission from 
his adviser, and then only when he is carrying less than the 
maximum amount of work, either to begin or to continue cor- 
respondence or extension courses while taking work in residence 
at East Carolina Teachers College. 

Moreover, a student enrolled for correspondence or extension 
work with another college must notify his adviser when he is 
taking such courses. Students are held individually responsible 
for any violation of this regulation. 

!Nbt more than fifteen per cent of the total hours required for 
the completion of any curriculum shall be earned through 
correspondence or extension study, or both. 



1 Required service courses, in health and physical education are not acceptable 
for credit towards certification in these fields. 

2 6-8 semester hours of biological and physical sciences and 6-8 semester hours 
of social sciences recommended as prerequisites. 



General Information 37 

FIELD COURSES 

Regulations Governing Field Courses 

From time to time field courses may be offered by the college 
to students who desire to enroll for educational tours through 
certain sections of the United States. The field courses do not 
duplicate any other courses offered by the college, and credit 
for them will be counted only as free electives on the student's 
curriculum. Application for admission to an educational tour 
must be made to the Registrar of the College in the same manner 
as for admission to residence study. 

1. Credit will be given according to the length of trip on any 
given course as follows : 

a. A maximum of twelve quarter hours for a field course 
of 36 days with a minimum of two days on the campus 
before the course starts and five days on the campus at 
the close of the course. 

b. A maximum of nine quarter hours credit will be given 
for a field course of 27 days with a minimum of two days 
on the campus before the course starts and three days on 
the campus at the end of the course. 

c. A maximum of six quarter hours credit for a field course 
of 18 days with a minimum of two days on the campus 
before the course starts and three days on the campus at 
the close of the course. 

d. A maximum of three quarter hours credit for a field course 
of 11 days with a minimum of one day on the campus 
before the course starts and two days on the campus at the 
close of the course. 

2. Nfot more than twelve quarter hours credit toward the A.B. 
degree will be allowed any student for field courses. 

3. All field courses for which credit is given shall be made by 
the college. 

4. The usual college regulations shall apply to the time limit 
for completing the work and reporting grades to the Registrar 
at the close of the course. 

5. !N"ot more than thirty students per teacher shall be included 
in any field course. 



38 East Carolina Teachers College 

6. The usual college regulations as to tests, readings, etc., shall 
apply to field courses. 

SUMMER QUARTER 

It is the aim of the College to render every service it may 
to advance the best interests of public education in our State. 
Realizing that many teachers wish to study after their schools 
close, that they may better equip themselves for their profession ; 
also realizing that all the schools of the counties do not close 
at the same time, the College, to meet these conditions, will 
admit students at the beginning of any regular quarter, and in 
addition to this it conducts a summer quarter. 

The summer quarter is equivalent in all respects to any other 
quarter in the college year. Credits completed in the summer 
quarter count toward graduation. 

If there is sufficient demand for any of the courses offered in 
this catalogue, the course is given. See summer school bulletin 
for information in detail. 

OBSERVATION AND PRACTICE TEACHING 

The campus laboratory school in the elementary grades, the 
local city high school and several cooperating schools in Eastern 
North Carolina are utilized for supervised student teaching. 
Each student working toward the Bachelor of Arts degree shall 
do at least ninety clock-hours of supervised teaching which 
shall be preceded by such a period of observation in the training 
school as may be specified by his training supervisor. The prac- 
tice teaching is accompanied by regular conference periods with 
the supervisor. To be eligible for admission to practice teaching 
a student shall have at least as many quality points as quarter 
hours of credit. The fee of $10.00 for practice teaching is due 
the Treasurer of the college at the beginning of the quarter in 
which the practice teaching is done. 

Application for the course in Observation and Practice 
Teaching must be made to the Registrar on a form provided, 
at least one month before the beginning of the quarter in which 
practice teaching is desired. 

Since it may not be possible to admit all applicants to this 



General Information 39 

work during a given quarter, they will be accepted in the order 
of the date of application. 

JSTo student will be admitted to practice teaching until he 
has done two full quarters of work in this college. 

Practice teaching is directed by a supervising teacher in 
charge of each room, by teachers of subject matter and methods 
courses in the College, and by the Director of Training Schools, 
who is in general charge of this phase of work. 

The college reserves the right to assign students to do practice 
teaching in the campus training school, the local city schools, or 
in nearby public schools outside the city. 

Students who do practice teaching in the grammar and 
primary grades shall carry both courses of practice teaching 
during the same quarter, except that they may carry one course 
during the summer term. 

The supervising teachers meet the student teachers in regular 
conference periods, and the methods teachers have frequent con- 
ferences with them. Each student is placed in the work for which 
he is best fitted, then he is given careful instruction in handling 
children and in presenting subject matter to them. Before the 
close of the year each student is left in complete charge of his 
class for a limited time, so that he may try himself out under 
conditions approaching an independent teaching situation. 

FRESHMAN REGISTRATION 

In order to facilitate the process of adjustment which the be- 
ginning student must pass through, the College has set up at the 
beginning of the fall quarter a "Freshman Registration" pro- 
gram for all students who are entering here for the first time. 
The events of this program include preregistration counseling, 
special lectures in student traditions and College regulations, 
tours of the College plant, social features in the student organiza- 
tions of the College, making up the student's program of studies 
for the quarter, and the administration of certain tests by the 
Conference Committee. These tests are administered as a part 
of the first year student's registration at the beginning of the 
fall, winter, and spring quarters. This program begins with 
a meeting of the entire freshman class in Lecture Room A, new 
classroom building, at 9 :00 a.m., on the first day of registration. 



40 East Carolina Teachers College 

All students entering the College for the first time are required 
to be present at all appointments comprising the freshman 
registration program. 

ADMISSION 

Application for admission to East Carolina Teachers College 
must he made on a form provided by the College. It must be 
approved by the Registrar before the student is permitted to 
enroll. The application for admission must be accompanied by 
the reservation fee of $5.00. The reservation fee becomes a reg- 
istration fee if the student presents himself at the College for 
registration, and it is not then refundable. 

The dates for registration in the different quarters of the 
college year are given in the calendar which appears in each 
annual catalogue. 

No student will be given, under any condition, a permit to 
register in any quarter later than two weeks after the regular 
date for his registration. Registration is not complete until all 
required registration forms have been filled out properly and 
filed with the Registrar. These forms must be returned to the 
Registrar within twenty-four hours after the student has re- 
ceived his permit to register. No registration forms will be 
accepted by the Registrar after one day has elapsed following 
the close of the registration period of two weeks. 

Registration is not complete until all fees for the quarter have 
been paid or arrangements made with the Treasurer for paying 
them, and required forms on file in the Registrar's office. 

Students who have not attended another college may be ad- 
mitted to East Carolina Teachers College under any one of the 
following conditions : 

1. The satisfactory completion of a four-year course in an 
approved secondary school, with sixteen units of credit. 

2. The equivalent of such a course as shown by passing the 
College entrance examination. 

3. Graduation from a four-year non-standard classified high 
school, and passing the State Senior High School examination 
(for admission to college), with sixteen units of credit. 

4. Evidence of having satisfactorily completed a standard 
secondary course in an accredited private or denominational 
school. 



General Information 41 

To be admitted on a transcript from another college a student 
must have passed more than 50 per cent of the credit hours of 
work carried during the last session in such college, and his grade 
average must be better than ten points below "3" or "C." 

Applicants for admission here for the first time are urged to 
have their credentials in the hands of the Registrar of the Col- 
lege several weeks prior to registration day. An official record of 
high school work must be presented as well as an official tran- 
script of all college work done. Honorable dismissal from the 
last college attended is required. These credentials must be ap- 
proved by the Registrar before the student is permitted to reg- 
ister and attend classes. 

No student will be admitted until records proving his eligi- 
bility have been presented. 

To be admitted to any curriculum a student must be sixteen 
years of age. 

The major portion of the secondary school course accepted for 
admission should be definitely correlated with the curriculum to 
which the student is admitted. 

A foreign language is not required for admission. 

PRESCRIBED UNITS FOR ADMISSION 

1. English 4 units 

Grammar and composition — one or two units. 
American literature — one unit. 
English literature — one unit. 

2. Mathematics 1% units 

Algebra — at least one unit. 

One unit in arithmetic is recommended for those 

majoring in elementary school teaching. 
One unit in geometry is recommended for those 

majoring in high school teaching. 

3. Social Science 2 units 

American history — one unit. 

Additional history, civics, or geography, one unit. 

4. Biological and Physical Science 2 units 

At least y 2 unit in each of two fields selected 
from biology, general science, chemistry, physics. 

5. Elective 6% units 



42 East Carolina Teaohebs College 

Not more than three vocational units (in all) will be accepted 
from home economics, manual training, agriculture, commercial 
subjects including short-hand, typewriting, bookkeeping, etc. 

Mathematics majors must present 2 units of algebra and one 
unit of plane geometry. 

Applicants not meeting these requirements, and graduates of 
non-standard high schools may be admitted by special examina- 
tion. The examination is general and covers the usual secondary 
school material in English, mathematics, history, and science. 

CLASSIFICATION 

Students working toward the completion of a definite cur- 
riculum in East Carolina Teachers College will be registered 
with a definite classification, as Ereshman Primary, Senior 
Grammar Grade, etc. Those taking a full schedule of studies for 
purposes other than graduation in this college will be listed as 
"Unclassified." Students taking a limited schedule of study (not 
more than eight hours) will be classified as special students. Stu- 
dents having fewer than 43 quarter hours of credit are classified 
as Freshmen ; those with 43 to 91 quarter hours are classified as 
Sophomores; those with 92 to 138 quarter hours are classified 
as Juniors; and those with 139 quarter hours or more are 
classified as Seniors. 

CREDIT 

The College operates on the quarter plan. The fall, winter, 
spring, and summer quarters are each approximately twelve 
weeks in length. The College is in session six days a week. Most 
classes meet three days a week. A quarter hour of credit is 
earned by one recitation period a week for one quarter; three 
quarter hours of credit are earned in a class that meets three 
tims a week for a quartr, etc. 

Seniors electing courses numbered below 100 will be allowed 
no more than two-thirds of the credit such courses carry. 

Credit will not be allowed on courses taken which substantially 
duplicate courses already completed. 

CLASS ABSENCE 

Absences are counted from the first class meeting, hence late 
registration constitutes absence from class. The general regula- 



General Information 43 

tion is that a student may not receive credit for any course in 
which more than one-fourth of the class meetings are missed. 
Each absence from class shall be recorded as a double cut unless 
it is excused by the Registrar on application by the student show- 
ing that the absence was necessary and caused by an emergency 
such as personal illness, illness in the family, representing the 
college, or representing an organization of the College. When so 
excused only single absence will be charged. Absences are not ex- 
cused at any time for any reason. Work missed must be made up 
to the satisfaction of the instructor. 

GRADES AND SCHOLARSHIP 

Beginning with the fall quarter 1942 a quality-point system 
will be used to calculate all student scholarship standings. The 
grades 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and c are used by this college; 1 is the 
highest grade given, 4 is the lowest passing grade, and 5 is a 
failing grade. A grade of c indicates a "condition" on the course 
because the student has not quite completed the quantitative 
requirements of the course. 

In qualitative values the grade 1 will earn 3 quality points a 
quarter hour on the course; the grade 2 will earn two quality 
points a quarter hour ; and the grade 3 will earn 1 quality point 
a quarter hour. No quality points will be given for a grade of 4, 
and one quality point will be deducted from the student's total 
for each grade of 5. 

When a student fails to maintain the minimum quality of 
scholarship indicated below, he shall be ineligible to re-register 
in the college : 

At the end of the first year (3 quarters) — 35 quarter hours of 
credit and 30 quality points, 

at the end of the second year (6 quarters) — 85 quarter hours 
of credit and 85 quality points, 

at the end of the third year (9 quarters) — 135 quarter hours 
of credit and 135 quality points. 

After the sophomore year a student shall have at all times 
at least as many quality points as he has credit hours as one con- 
dition of re-enrollment in the college. 

Exceptions to this regulation may be made only by the Com- 
mittee on Classification and Credit on the written recommenda- 



44 East Cabolina Teachees College 

tion of the adviser of the student concerned and of the teachers 
under whom grades helow average were made during his last 
quarter. If exception is made, the student may re-enroll only on 
probation and exception shall be made only once for the same 
student. The quality point-credit ratio of transfer students 
will be considered "1" or average for all credit hours accepted 
toward the completion of the student's curriculum. 

The grade made on a course once passed in this college cannot 
be changed on the official record except to correct a manifest 
error, though a course may be repeated for a better knowledge 
of its content. 

No credit will be given for courses that carry the lowest pass- 
ing grade when submitted on transcript from another college. 

REGULATIONS CONCERNING STUDENTS' PROGRAM 

All regular students are required to schedule at least 12 credit 
hours per quarter. 

Courses may be dropped within the first four weeks of the 
quarter provided such changes are approved by the teacher whose 
courses are concerned, by the student's adviser, and by the reg- 
istrar. If a course is pursued for four or more weeks after reg- 
istration and then dropped, that course will be reported as f ailed 
and so counted in arranging the program of work for the next 
quarter. 

The standard student load is sixteen hours per quarter. In 
order to facilitate making schedules, students may carry seven- 
teen hours. Students who average two or better may carry eight- 
een hours the following quarter. Students who fail one or more 
courses, the credit value of which totals three quarter hours, or 
more, shall carry no more than thirteen quarter hours the fol- 
lowing quarter, except that all regular students must schedule a 
minimum of twelve hours per quarter. 

A student cannot enter courses later than the beginning of 
the third week of the quarter and get credit for such courses. 

A student may drop courses from his program and take 
other courses instead, provided such changes are made before the 
beginning of the third week of the quarter and provided also that 
such changes are approved by the teachers whose courses are con- 
cerned, by the student's adviser, and by the Registrar. A charge 



General Information 45 

of twenty-five cents will be made for each subject added or 
dropped from a schedule at the student's option. 

A student, other than a first quarter freshman, who fails to 
carry successfully at least nine quarter hours of work during 
any quarter shall not be readmitted to the college during the 
next succeeding quarter. This regulation is enforced strictly. 

A special student, having a schedule of fewer than nine hours, 
must receive a passing mark on each subject scheduled in order 
to be eligible to readmission to the next succeeding quarter of 
the college. 

FEES AND EXPENSES 
Day Students 

The fee for day students, i.e., those not living in one of the 
college dormitories, is $36.00 a quarter of twelve weeks. 

Dormitory Students 

The fee for dormitory students is $98.50 a quarter. This fee 
covers tuition, instruction, board, room, laundry, rental of text- 
books, admission to college entertainments, subscription to the 
college paper, and infirmary service for minor illness. 

Reservation Fee 

A reservation fee of $5.00 must accompany the application for 
admission from all students. The fee is credited to the student's 
account, provided he enrolls in the quarter for which reserva- 
tion is made. If he wishes to withdraw his application and notifies 
the college in writing at least two weeks before the opening of 
the quarter, the fee will be returned, except that no refund of a 
fall quarter fee will be made if requested after September tenth. 

Fees Payable Each Quarter by Ai/l Students 

Board 
and Registration Tui- Student 
Room Books, etc. tion Activity Total 

Dormitory Student $62.50 $7.50 $22.50 $6.00 $98.50 

Day Student $7.50 $22.50 $6.00 $36.00 

All the fees above, except the student activity fee, must be 
paid to the Treasurer at the beginning of the quarter. 

The student activity fee must be paid to the Treasurer of the 
Student Fund at the beginning of the quarter. 



46 East Carolina Teachers College 

Other Fees 

Non-residents of N. 0. (a quarter) $25.00 

Private music lessons (a quarter) , 7.00 

Laboratory fees in certain subjects 2.00 

Practice teaching 10.00 

Diploma fee (with application for graduation) 5.00 

Late registration 1.00 

Changes in schedule (a subject) 25 

Transcript (after first) 50 

"Auditor" in one or more courses 6.00 

Infirmary fee* 1.00 

Special students, i.e., day students who schedule not more 
than eight credit hours a quarter, will pay a fee of $3.00 a 
credit hour scheduled. 

These fees are subject to revision by the Board of Trustees of 
the college, and it reserves the right to revise them at any time it 
is found necessary or advisable to do so. 

To be exempt from the out-of-state fee : 

1. The parents or guardian of a student must be residents of 
the state at the time of his registration, or 

2. The student must have established residence in the state at 
least six months before he entered the college. 

A resident student is construed to be one who actually lives in 
the State and not one who has merely moved into the State for the 
purpose of securing an education from one of the State Insti- 
tutions. 

WITHDRAWALS, REFUNDS, CREDITS 

Students who, for any reason, withdraw from the college be- 
fore the end of any quarter will have a proportionate part of the 
amount paid for board refunded. In addition, if a student with- 
draws before registration for the quarter is closed, one-half of the 
fees for room and tuition will also be refunded. Refund will be 
calculated from the date of official withdrawal from the College. 

A student desiring to withdraw from college should do so with 
the consent of his parent or guardian and the approval of the 
Registrar. Students who withdraw unofficially are not eligible 
to re-enroll in the college. 

* Charged day students not living in own homes. Gives infirmary service. 



General Information 47 

Credit. — No degree, diploma, or certificate will be granted or 
a transcript of credits furnished a student until all financial 
obligations to the college, other than student loans, have been 
paid. 

All previously incurred expenses and accounts at the college 
must be fully paid or secured before a student may re-enter at 
the beginning of any quarter. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Any student who receives a degree from East Carolina Teach- 
ers College must have done as much as one year (36 weeks) in 
residence study in this College. The three quarters need not be 
consecutive, but the last quarter of resident study previous to 
graduation must be done in this College. 

Any student who receives a degree or diploma from the Col- 
lege must meet the requirements of the catalogue under which 
he enters or of some subsequent catalogue, provided that no stu- 
dent will be permitted to graduate under a catalogue issued 
more than seven years prior to the date of his graduation. 

E"o person will be graduated from the College who has not 
fully met all the requirements laid down by the State Depart- 
ment of Certification for the teacher's certificate to which his 
curriculum specifically leads. 

In order to graduate, a student shall have earned at least as 
many quality points as he has quarter hours of credit. Grades 
made on courses taken by correspondence, by extension, and in 
summer schools other than East Carolina Teachers College shall 
not be considered. 

When a student changes from one curriculum to another he 
shall notify the Registrar in writing, stating the major he is 
dropping and the one he is taking up. 

A student who changes from one curriculum to another will 
be required to complete fully all of the required core of the 
curriculum from which he is to be graduated. 

Presence at graduating exercises is required, except when per- 
mission for graduation in absentia has been granted by the 
Registrar. A written request for such a permission must be made 
at least ten days before commencement. 



48 East Carolina Teachebs College 

Application for graduation must be made on a 'blank provided 
by the college not later than registration day of the last quarter 
the student is enrolled in the college. The diploma fee of $5.00 
must accompany the application. 

Before a student is granted a diploma he is required to pass a 
test in spelling. Students majoring in primary and grammar 
grade work must also pass a proficiency test in handwriting. To 
pass the spelling requirement the student must make a score 
equal to or better than the eighth grade norm on each of two 
standard spelling tests. To pass the handwriting requirement 
the student must equal or better the quality score of seventy on 
the Ayer's handwriting scale. Passing scores in these tests con- 
stitute a prerequisite to practice teaching. These tests will be 
offered and students will be required to take them during the 
first year in residence. Names of those passing the tests will be 
reported to the Registrar's office on the form regularly used to 
report class grades. 

Upper classmen whose written work is so poor as to lack clear- 
ness and accuracy may be reported by their teachers to the 
Committee on Standards in Written Composition and assigned 
to the English Department for remedial work until their ad- 
visers and the Committee are satisfied that they no longer need 
help. 

CURRICULA OFFERED 

In order to carry out the aims of the College the following 
regular curricula of instruction have been arranged and are 
offered : 

(a) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. Degree, for 
those who expect to become Primary Teachers. 

(b) A Eour-Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. Degree, for 
those who expect to become Grammar Grade Teachers. 

(c) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the A.B. Degree, for 
those who expect to become High School Teachers. 

(d) A Four- Year Curriculum leading to the B.S. Degree. 

(e) Graduate work leading to the M.A. Degree in the fields of 
School Administration and Elementary Education, and 
in the following high school subjects : English, History, 
Mathematics, Science, and Social Science. 



Genebal Infobmation 49 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE B.S. DEGREE 

Candidates for the B.S. degree must meet the following 
requirements : 

1. Satisfy all college regulations and requirements for grad- 
uation, except those pertaining to practice teaching and certifi- 
cation. 

2. Complete the following courses within the freshman and 
sophomore years, unless major or minor requirements provide 
other 4 subjects in these departments: 

Economics 101 ; English 1, 2, 3, 110 and 111 or 112a and 112b ; 
Geography 10 ; Government 1 ; History 10, 11, 12 ; Mathematics 
154, 156 ; Physical Education, 6 hours ; Psychology 103 ; Science, 
9 hours sequence courses in Chemistry, Biology or Physics; 
Sociology 100. 

Juniors cannot elect a course numbered below 100, and seniors 
cannot elect a course numbered below 200. 

Each candidate must choose one department for a major and 
another department for a minor. 

The number of credits in quarter hours for a major shall not 
be less than 42 nor more than 54. The credit hours required of 
each student, within the above limits, and the subjects to be 
taken by each student in the major department shall be deter- 
mined solely by the director of that department. 

The director of the major department is the student's adviser 
in all matters except those pertaining to requirements in the 
minor department. 

The number of credits in quarter hours for a minor shall not 
be less than 30 nor more than 36. The credit hours required of 
each student, within the above limits, and the subjects to be 
taken by each student in the minor department shall be deter- 
mined solely by the director of that department. 

REQUIREMENTS IN THE MAJOR FIELD 

The requirements for a major in each department offering a 
major are : 

1. Business Education— 1, 2, 3, 104, 106, 107, 108, 231, 232, 
341, and at least 18 additional credit hours. 



50 East Carolina Teachers College 

2. English— 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 218, 219, 222, 
314, or 315, 319, 325, 326 or 327, and at least 6 additional credit 
hours. 

3. Foreign Languages: Erench 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106 or 
Spanish 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, and at least 24 additional 
credit hours. 

4. Geography— 10, 11, 12, 110, 112, 113, 125, 210, 211, 212, 
215, 310, and at least 6, additional hours. 

5. History— 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 218, 219, 
300, 325;, 326, and at least 6 additional hours. 

6. Home Economics— 2, 7, 8, 110, 117, 126, 127, 224, 225, 
226, 230, 231, 319, 326, and at least 6 additional hours. 

7. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 214, 
215, and at least 9 additional hours. 

8. Music Education— 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 113, 
205a, 205b, 210, and at least 20 additional hours. 

9. Physical Education— 14, 17, 21, 23, 41, 105, 107, 110, 119, 
120, 127, 210, 225, 302, 317, and at least 25 additional hours. 

10. Science— 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 215, 216, 217, and 18 
additional hours. 

11. Social Science, Economics— 102, 103, 202, 301; Govern- 
ment 202, 302 ; Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204; Geography 11, 125 ; 
History 30, 31, 32, and 9 additional hours. 

REQUIREMENTS IN MINOR FIELD 

The requirements for a minor in each department offering 
a minor are: 

1. Business Education— 1, 2, 3, 104, 106, 107, 108, 231, 341, 
and at least 9 hours additional. 

2. English— 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 222, 325, and 
at least 6 hours additional. 

3. Foreign Languages— French— 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, or 
Spanish 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, and at least 12 hours additional. 

4. Geography— 10, 11 or 125, 12, 110, 112, 113, 210, 211 or 
215, 212, and 310. 

5. History— 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 218, 219, 
and 317. 

6. Home Economics— 2, 7, 8, 110, 126, 127, 224, 225, 226, 
230, 231, and at least 3 hours additional. 



General Information 51 

7. Mathematics— 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 214, 
and 215. 

8. Music-Education— 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205a, 
and at least 12 hours additional. 

9. Physical Education— 14, 17, 21, 23, 105, 107, 120, 210, 
225, 317, and at least 14 hours additional. 

10. Science— 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 215, 216, and 217. 

11. Social Science, Economics — 102, 103, 301; Government 
202, 302; Geography 11, Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204, and six 
additional hours. 

A student who completes three years work in any curriculum 
set up for the A.B. degree may secure the B.S. degree hy meet- 
ing the following additional requirements: 

A. For High School Majors: 

1. Select one subject as a major and another as a minor. 

2. Complete all courses for the major combination as set 
up for the A.B. degree, except practice teaching and, 
if the student desires to omit them, the remaining 
courses in Education. 

3. Take any courses selected by his major adviser to sub- 
stitute for practice teaching and any courses not taken 
in Education, provided that all courses taken to substi- 
tute for practice teaching and junior and senior courses 
in Education must be numbered 200 or above. 

B. For Grammar and Primary Majors : 

1. Complete all courses in the curriculum as set up for his 
major, except practice teaching. 

2. Take any courses selected by his major adviser to sub- 
stitute for practice teaching, provided that all courses 
used to substitute for practice teaching must be num- 
bered 200 or above. 

Note: The A.B. curriculum at East Carolina Teachers Col- 
lege carries the professional education courses that qualify the 
candidate for a state teachers certificate. 

The B.S. Curriculum is a liberal arts curriculum and does 
not carry the education courses that qualify for a state teachers 
certificate. 



52 East Carolina Teaohebs College 

Any student who completes the requirements for the A.B. 
degree and, in addition, completes the requirements under plan 1 
for the B.S. degree may he granted hoth degrees, provided that 
no student may be granted two degrees at the same commence- 
ment or at the close of the same quarter. 

GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 

1. Purpose. Graduate instruction is organized to provide for 
two classes of graduate students : first, those who wish to become 
candidates for the degree of Master of Arts, and second, those 
who wish to do work beyond the Bachelor's Degree without refer- 
ence to a higher degree. 

2. Administration. The administration and direction of grad- 
uate instruction is in charge of a Director of the Department of 
Graduate Instruction and a committee of five members of the 
faculty appointed by the President of the College. 

3. Admission to Graduate Instruction. Application for admis- 
sion to graduate instruction must be made to the Director of 
Graduate Instruction. Blanks for this purpose may be secured 
from his office. 

To be admitted to graduate instruction, an applicant must hold 
a Bachelor's Degree from this College or from some other insti- 
tution of equal rank or lack not more than six quarter hours of 
work to complete the resident requirements for the Bachelor's 
Degree, provided he is recommended for graduate standing by 
the Director of his Major Department. He must also have met 
the undergraduate requirements for his major and minor fields 
and made not less than an average grade of three in all his under- 
graduate work. 

If the undergraduate work of an applicant does not show the 
completion of at least fifteen quarter hours in English, nine of 
which shall be Composition, and twenty-four quarter hours in a 
combination of Education and Psychology, such deficiencies shall 
be made up before the Master's Degree will be conferred. 

Admission to graduate study is not equivalent to admission 
to candidacy for the degree of Master of Arts. 

4. Transcripts. Graduates from other institutions must present 
an official transcript of all high school and college work com- 



General Infobmation 53 

pleted. This transcript should be filed with the Registrar of the 
College before the first enrollment. 

5. General Information. Each graduate student should choose 
a major field and consult the director of graduate study in that 
department with reference to the work to be done in that 
department. 

Courses numbered 300 to 399 may be taken by graduate stu- 
dents if they are designated in the catalog as being open to grad- 
uate students. 

Courses numbered 400 or above are open to graduate students 
only. 

6. Marks. Credit is given for graduate instruction only for 
marks "1," "2," and "3." 

7. Transfer of Credit. A limited amount of acceptable grad- 
uate credit earned in a fully accredited institution may be 
offered to apply on the Master of Arts degree. Such credit is 
allowed only on the recommendation of the department or de- 
partments concerned and the approval of the Graduate Com- 
mittee. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF MASTER 
OF ARTS 

1. Residence. At least three full quarters must be spent in 
residence, provided that nine quarter hours shall count as the 
minimum of work for one quarter in residence. 

2. Admission to Candidacy. Each student must make applica- 
tion to the Director of Graduate Instruction for admission to 
candidacy not later than the first week of the quarter or summer 
session at the close of which the degree is to be conferred. 

3. Course Requirements. At least forty-five quarter hours of 
graduate work must be completed with no grade below a "3" and 
one-third of the grades above a "3." The work may be done 
under either of the following plans: 

a. Eighteen quarter hours in major field, nine quarter hours 
in Education or Psychology or in a combination of both, 
six quarter hours of seminar, twelve quarter hours electives, 
and a thesis. The electives shall be selected with the advice 
of the director of the major department. 



54 East Carolina Teachers College 

b. Twenty-four quarter hours in major field, nine quarter 
hours in Education or Psychology or in a combination of 
both, and twelve quarter hours electives to be chosen with 
the advice of the director of the major department. 
Not more than fifteen quarter hours of work may be taken 
in any one quarter. 

Not more than twelve quarter hours of work may be taken 
from courses numbering 300 to 399. 

4. Thesis. If a thesis is written it must show the result of an 
investigation of some educational problem related to the major 
field. The subject of the thesis must be approved by the director 
of his major department and the Graduate Committee at least 
two quarters before the degree is conferred. The thesis must be 
approved by the director of the major department and by the 
Graduate Committee at least two weeks before the degree is con- 
ferred. One bound typewritten copy of the thesis must be filed 
with the librarian of the college and one copy must be filed with 
the director of the major department before the degree is 
conferred. 

No credit will be given for the seminar until after the thesis 
has been accepted. 

5. Teaching Ability. Each student must satisfy the Graduate 
Committee as to his ability to teach. This may be done in either 
of two ways : (a) successful teaching experience, or (b) success- 
ful student teaching. 

CIVIL AERONAUTICS 

In cooperation with the Federal Government, East Carolina 
Teachers College offers work preliminary to admission to ad- 
vanced flying schools. This work was begun in March 1941 and 
has been in continuous operation. A number of students who 
began their flying here are already with the government flying 
forces. The college offers several related courses to supplement 
the course in ground instruction and flying which are supervised 
by an instructor designated by the federal government. An 



General Information 55 

excellent flying field, hangar, and training planes are part of the 
equipment for this work. 

200. Primary Ground Instruction. 

This course is divided into three parts: 

1. Navigation. 

2. Meter ology. 

3. Civil Air Regulations. 

Each division requires 24 hours work; credit: 

4 quarter hours. 

Credited as free elective on any curriculum. 



CURRICULA REQUIREMENTS 



I. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in the Primary 

Grades. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the college 
when a student has received 190 quarter hours credit and has met 
the following requirements for teaching in the primary grades : 

a. 47 Professional credits: 

Education 1, 104, 205, 206, 231-2-3, 316, 318, 322, 

339, 341-2-3 credit: 35 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 201, 205, 308 credit: 12 q.h. 

b. 120 Academic credits : 

Economics credit: 3 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 107, 110, 111, 218, elec. 1 Jr. 

course credit : 24 q.h. 

Geography 10, 230, 330 „ credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 205 credit: 21 q.h. 

Mathematics 42, 136, 156, 212, 325 credit: 15 q.h. 

Health and Physical Educ. 240, 244, 245 credit: 9 q.h. 

Art Education 1, 102, 221 credit: 9 q.h. 

Public School Music 10, 202, 306 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 3 hours elective _ credit: 12 q.h. 

Sociology credit: 6 q.h. 

c. Free electives credit: 23 q.h. 

Total credit: 190 qh. 

II. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in Grammar Grades. 

a. 44 Professional credits : 

Education 1, 234-5-6-7, 248, 317, 318, 322, 339, 

344-5-6-7 - credit: 29 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 201, 204, 205, 308 credit: 15 q.h. 

b. 126 Academic credits : 

Economics 104 ~ credit: 3 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 113, 204, 218, 222 credit: 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, 160, 221, 230 credit: 12 q.h. 

Government 1 _ credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 205 credit: 21 q.h. 

Mathematics 42, 136, 156, 210, 325 credit: 15 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education 240, 244, 245 credit: 9 q.h. 

Art Education 3, 104, 301 credit: 9 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 57 

Public School Music 10, 203, 306 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25, 172, 173 credit: 15 q.h. 

Sociology, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

c. Free electives credit: 20 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

III. For Candidates Preparing to Teach in the High 
School. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred by the College 
when the student has received a minimum of 190 quarter hours 
credit, including two majors from the following groups. 

Business Education and English 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 .credit: 48 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216A, 216B, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Education 1, 223be (a. b.), 223e, 318, 324be, 324e, 325....credit: 30 q.h. 

Geography 10 „ credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 ...credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Sociology 202, 203 credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 168 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 22 q.h. 

Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Foreign Language 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elective 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit 48 q.h. 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210, 215, 

216, 217, elective 6 hours _ credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 
elective 12 hours .credit: 42 q.h. 

Education 1, 223be (a.b.), 223f, 318 or 322, 324be, 
324f, 325 , credit: 30 q.h. 

*.See course descriptions — Spanish 111, 112, 113. 



58 East Carolina Teachers College 

English 1, 2, 3, 222, elective 3 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10 credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and History 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 48 q.h. 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics 101 , credit: 3 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 222, elective 3 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Education 1, 223be (a.h.), 223h, 318, 324be, 324h, 

325 credit : 30 q.h. 

Geography 10, 212 credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 credit: 3 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective ...credit: 6 q.h. 

Sociology 202 credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Mathematics 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 48 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Education 1, 223be (a.b), 223m, 323m, 318 or 322, 

324be, 324m, 325 credit: 33 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 222 credit: 12 q.h. 

Geography 10 credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 59 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 215, 216, 217 - credit: 12 q.h. 

Required Oore credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Music Education 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 48 q.h. 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209, 
Musical organizations; 12 hours: Prescribed elec- 
tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Education 1, 223be (a.b.), 223mu, 318 or 322, 324be, 

324mu, 325 credit: 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 222, elective 6 hours credit: 18 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 180, elective 3 hours credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 175 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 15 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Physical Education 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 
215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 48 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education : Men : 13, 14, 17, 21 
or 121, 2.3, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 114, 
119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317, and 

Science 106, 107, 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women. 13, 14, 15, 17, 21, or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 
105, 107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 
302, 306, U7, and Science 106, 107, 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Education X 223pe, 223be (a.b), 318, 324pe, 324be, 
325 credit : 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2,3, 222 credit: 12 q.h. 

Geography 10 credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 credit: 3 q.h. 



60 East Carolina Teachers College 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Science 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316....credit: 
Education 1, 223be (a.b.), 223s, 318 or 322, 324be, 

324s, 325 credit: 

English 1, 2, 3, 222, elective 6 hours credit: 

Geography 10 _ credit: 

Government 1 credit: 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 

Required Core _ credit : 

Free electives credit: 



48 


q.h. 


42 


q.h. 


30 


q.h. 


18 


q.h. 


3 


q.h. 


3 


q.h. 


9 


q.h. 


6 


q.h. 


9 


q.h. 


168 q.h. 


22 


q.h. 



.credit: 5* q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Business Education and Social Science 

Business 1, 2, 3, 110, 114, 115, 116, 130, 131, 132, 214, 

215, 218, 231, elect 6 hours from 104, 133, 341 credit: 48 ft.h. 

Social Science: 

Economics 101, 102, 103 

Government 1, 302 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 205, 317 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204 
Education 1, 223be (a.b.), 223ss, 318, 324be,~324ss, 

325 ~ credit : 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 222 credit: 12 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credft: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Gore - credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit : 190 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 61 

English and Foreign Language 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 
elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 

elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223e, 223f, 318 or 322, 324e, 324f, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, elective 3 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 ..credit : 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, elective 3 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 162 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 28 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

English and History 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102 credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223e, 223h, 318, 324e, 324h, 325 credit: 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 113, 212 ...credit: 12 q.h. 

Government 1 . _ credit: 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology 202, 203 ...credit: 6 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core : credit: 168 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 22 q.h. 



Total credit : 190 q.h. 

English and Mathematics 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 
222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

* See course descriptions — Spanish 111, 112, 113. 



62 East Carolina Teachers College 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223e, 223m, 323m, 318 or 322, 324e, 

324m, 325 credit: 30 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12 credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, elective 9 hours credit: 18 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education 127, elective 4 hours.-credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 215, 216, 217 credit: 12 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

English and Music Education 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209, 
Musical organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 
tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Economics 101, 104 credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223mu, 223e, 318 or 322, 324mu, 324e, 

325 „ credit : 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, elective 3 hours credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 114, 115, 116, elective 3 hours....credit: 12 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective 6 hours.-jcredit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 180, elective 6 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology 202, 203 credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core .credit: 178 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 12 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

English and Physical Education 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 
21 or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 114, 
119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317 and 
Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 63 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 105, 
107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 302, 

306, 317, and Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Education 1, 223e, 223pe, 318 or 322, 324e, 324pe, 

325 , credit : 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, elective 6 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 114, 115, 116 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology 202, elective 3 hours credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 165 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 25 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

English and Science 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216h, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316 credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223e, 223s, 318 or 322, 324e, 324s, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

Geography 10, 125, elective 3 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 „ credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115, elective 3 hours....credit: 12 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective.... credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 162 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 28 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

English and Social Science 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112a, 112b, 213, 216a, 216b, 

222, 325, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Social Science: 

Economics 101, 102, 103 

Government 1, 302 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 205, 
317 

Education 1, 223e, 223ss, 318 or 322, 324e,'324ss, 325..credit: 27 q.h. 
Geography 10, 12, 125, 330 credit: 12 q.h. 



.credit: 54 q.h. 



64 East Carolina Teachers College 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 162 q.h. 

Free eleotives credit: 28 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and History 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 

elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 

elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 9 q.h. 

Education 1, 223f, 223h, 318 or 322, 324f, 324h, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111 credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 212, elective 3 hours credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core ....credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and Mathematics 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 

elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

'Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 

elective 12 hours „ credit: 42 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 214, 

215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223f, 223m, 323m, 318 or 322, 324f, 

324m, 325 credit: 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

* See course descriptions — Spanish 111, 112, 113. 



Curricula Requirements 65 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 -.credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 215, 216, 217 credit: 12 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and Music Education 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 

elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 

elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209, 
Musical organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 
tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223f, 223mu, 318 or 322, 324f, 324mu, 

325 credit : 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 180, elective 3 hours credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 166 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 24 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and Physical Education 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 
elective 15 hours ., credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 
elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 
21 or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 
114, 119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 

317 and Science 106, 107, 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 

* See course descriptions — Spanish 111, 112, 113. 
6 



66 East Carolina Teachebs College 

105, 107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 

302, 306, 317 and Science 106, 107, 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Education 1, 223f, 223pe, 318 or 322, 324pe, 324f, 325-credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology, elective credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and Science 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 

elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 

elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316....credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics, Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223f, 223s, 318 or 322, 324f, 324s, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 165 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 25 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Foreign Language and Social Science 

French 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 207, 208, 210 or 212, 

elective 15 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Or 

Spanish* 11, 12, 13, 104, 105, 106, 206, 207, 208, 212, 
elective 12 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

* See course descriptions — Spanish 111, 112, 113. 



Curricula Requirements 67 

Social Science: 

Economics 101, 102, 103, 301 

Government 1, 202, 302 ....credit: 54 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204, 205 

Education 1, 223ss, 223f, 318 or 322, 324ss, 324f, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 125 credit: 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Gore credit: 162 q.h. 

Free electives ..credit: 28 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

HlSTOEY AND MATHEMATICS 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 

Economics 101, 102 credit: 

Education 1, 223h, 223m, 318 or 322, 323m, 324h, 

324m, 325 credit: 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111 credit: 

Geography 10, 212 credit : 

Government 1 credit: 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 

Science, elective credit: 

Sociology 202, 203 credit: 

Required Gore credit: 

Free electives credit: 



42 


q.h. 


6 


q.h. 


30 


q.h. 


15 q.h. 


6 


q.h. 


3 


q.h. 


6 


q.h. 


9 


q.h. 


9 


q.h. 


6 


q.h. 


174 


q.h. 


16 


q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

History and Music Education 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours credit: 42 q.h. 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209; 
Musical Organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 
tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102 credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223h, 223mu, 318, 324h, 324mu, 325....credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111 credit: 15 q.h. 



68 East Caeolina Teachebs College 

Geography 10, 212 credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective. credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 180, elective 3 hours credit: 6 q.h. 

Sociology 202 ^ credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 172 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 18 q.h. 



Total credit : 190 q.h. 

HlSTOBY AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, and 6 hours elective credit: 42 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 21 
or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 114, 
119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317 and 

Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 
105, 107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 

302, 306, 317 and Science 106, 107 and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102 credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223h, 223p, 318, 324h, 324p, 325 credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110 credit: 12 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 212 credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology 202 : credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 168 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 22 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

HlSTOBY AND SCIENOB 

History 30, 31, 32, 116, 130, 131, 132, 208, 209, 221, 

325, 326, elective 6 hours. credit: 42 q.h. 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316....credit. 42 q.h. 

Economics 101, 102 credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223h, 223s, 318 or 322, 324h, 324s, 325..credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111 credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125, 212 credit: 12 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 69 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Sociology 202 credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free eleotives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Home Economics and Science 

Home Economics 2, 7, 8, 110, 117, 126, 127, 224, 225, 

226, 227, 230, 231, 319, 326 credit: 45 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 44, 45, 113, 115, 116, 117, 207, 309, 

310 credit: 39 q.h. 

Education 1, 223he, 223s, 324he, 324s, 325, 318 or 322....credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 218, 222 .credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 125 credit: 6 q.h. 

History 205, 3 hours elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Mathematics 154 or 156 credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education credit: 3 q.h. 

Art 15a, 215he credit: 6 q.h. 

Sociology 10, 211, 205 credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Home Economics and Social Science 

Home Economics 2, 7, 8, 110, 117, 126, 127, 224, 225, 

226, 227, 230, 231, 319, 326 credit: 45 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115} 

Sociology 10, 101, 203, 205, 211 I aMt . ^ 

Government 1, 302 4 

Economics 101, 102 / 

Science 23, 24, 44, 45, 113, 115, 207, 310 credit: 29 q.h. 

Education 1, 223he, 223ss, 324he, 324ss, 325, 3 hours 
elective credit : 27 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 3 hours elective _ credit: 9 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 218 _ credit: 12 q.h. 

Art 15a, 215he -.credit: 6 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 173 q.h. 

Free eleotives credit: 17 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 



70 East Carolina Teachers College 

Mathematics and Music Education 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209. 

Musical Organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 

tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Economics and Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223m, 323m, 223mu, 318 or 322, 324m, 

324mu, 325 credit: 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 115, 116, 117 - credit: 12 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 175 q.h. 

Free eleotives credit: 15 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Mathematics and Physical Education 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 21 

or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 114, 
119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317 

and Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 105, 
107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 302, 

306, 317, and Science 106, 107 and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Education 1, 325, 223p, 223m, 323m, 324p, 324m, 322....credit: 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, and elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Psychology, 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 168 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 22 q.h. 

Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Mathematics and Science 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 214, 

215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 



Curricula Requirements 71 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316 credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics and Sociology, elective credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223m, 323m, 223s, 324m, 324s, 325 credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 125 credit: 3 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education, elective credit: 4 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 160 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 30 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Mathematics and Social Science 

Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, 110, 121, 122, 154, 213, 

214, 215, 232, 233, 318 credit: 42 q.h. 

Social Science 

Economics 101, 102, 103, 301 

Government 1, 202, 302 i credit: 54 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204, 205 
Education 1, 223m, 323m, 223ss, 318 or 322, 324m, 

324ss, 325 credit: 30 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 9 hours credit: 18 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit: 9 q.h. 

Health and Physical Education credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science, elective credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Music Education 

To major in Music, a student must meet the entrance require- 
ments of the department. 

1. An acceptable singing voice and the ability to sing ac- 
curately as to pitch and rhythm. 

2. Demonstrate his ability to play with some degree of pro- 
ficiency the piano or some orchestral instrument. 



72 East Carolina Teachers College 

All music majors are to be given placement examinations on 
entering the college. They will consequently he advised by the 
department head concerning their elective music courses. 

Music Education and Science 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209. 
Musical Organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 

tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316....credit: 42 q.h. 

Economics 101; Sociology 202 _ credit: 6 q.h. 

Education 1, 223mu, 223s, 318 or 322, 324mu, 324s, 

325 credit : 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, elective 6 hours credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit: 9 q.h. 

Government 1 credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 or 113, 114, 115 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 172 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 18 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Music Education and Social Science 

Music 10, 11, 106, 107, 110, 111, 112, 205, 208, 209, 
Musical Organizations: 12 hours. Prescribed elec- 
tives: 12 hours credit: 46 q.h. 

Social Science 

Economics 101, 102, 103, 301 

Government 1, 202, 302 L credit: 54 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204, 205 
Education 1, 223mu, 223ss, 318 or 322, 324mu, 324ss, 

325 „ credit : 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 218, elective 6 hours credit: 18 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 156 credit: 3 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 160 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 30 q.h. 



Total „,„.,..,„ credit: 190 q.h, 



Curricula Requirements 73 

Physical Education and Science 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 
21 or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 
114, 119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317 

and Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 105, 
107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 302, 

306, 317, and Science 106, 107 and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Science 100, 105, 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 215, 216, 217....credit: 42 q.h. 

Education 1, 223pe, 223s, 324pe, 324s, 325 credit: 24 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111 credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 125 credit: 6 q.h. 

Government 1 .credit: 3 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309, 340 credit: 12 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 171 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 19 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 

Physical Education and Social Science 

Health and Physical Education: Men: 13, 14, 17, 21 
or 121, 23, 28, 41, 105, 107 or 111 or 112, 110, 114, 
119, 120, 127, 210, 211, 213, 225, 302, 306, 317 and 
Science 106, 107, and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Women: 13, 14, 15, 17, 21 or 121, 23, 24, 41, 104, 
105, 107, 110, 111, 112, 119, 120, 127, 210, 212, 225, 
302, 306, 317, and Science 106, 107 and 113 credit: 45 q.h. 

Social Science 

Economics 101, 102, 103 

Government 1, 302 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115, 116, 205, 

317 
Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204 

Education 1, 223pe, 223ss, 318, 324pe, 324ss,' 325 credit: 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 6 hours elective. credit: 15 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156 credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Science 23, 24, 25 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 174 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 16 q.h. 



.credit: 54 q.h. 



Total credit: 190 q.h. 



74 East Carolina Teachers College 

Science and Social Science 
Science 34, 35, 36, 44, 45, 46, 200, 215, 216, 217, 316....credit: 42 q.h. 
Social Science 

Economics 101, 102, 103, 301 

Government 1, 202, 302 I credit: 54 q.h. 

History 10, 11, 12, 113, 114, 115 

Sociology 101, 202, 203, 204, 205 
Education 1, 223s, 223ss, 318 or 322, 324s, 324ss, 

325 credit : 27 q.h. 

English 1, 2, 3, 110, 111, 112b credit: 18 q.h. 

Geography 10, 12, 125 credit: 9 q.h. 

Mathematics 154, 156. credit: 6 q.h. 

Psychology 103, 205, 309 credit: 9 q.h. 

Required Core credit: 165 q.h. 

Free electives credit: 25 q.h. 



TotaL credit: 190 q.h. 

IV. For Candidates Preparing to be Superintendents or 
Principals or to Receive Graduate Certificates. 

The Degree of Master of Arts is conferred by the College 
when the candidate meets the general graduate requirements and 
completes the prescribed work in any of the following fields : 
A. Administration and Supervision. 

1. For a Superintendent. 

a. Twenty-seven quarter hours of graduate work from the 
following: 

1. Fundamental bases of Education. 

a. The Curriculum, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

b. Human Growth and Development. 

c. Social Foundations of Education. 

2. Instructional and Supervisory Techniques. 

a. Principles of Supervision, at least 3 quarter hours re- 
quired. 

b. Teaching Procedures. 

c. Guidance and Pupil Personnel and Accounting. 

d. Measurements. 

3. Organization and Administration. 

a. General Administration, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

b. School finance, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

c. School Plant. 

d. Staff Personnel. 

e. Community Relations. 

b. Electives 18 quarter hours 



Curricula Requirements 75 

2. For a Principal. 

a. Twenty-seven quarter hours of graduate work from the 
following: 

1. Fundamental Bases of Education. 

a. The Curriculum, at least 3 quarter hours required. 

b. Human Growth and Development. 

c. Social Foundations of Education. 

2. Instructional and Supervisory Techniques. 

a. Principles of Supervision, at least 3 quarter hours re- 
quired. 

b. Teaching Procedures. 

c. Guidance and Pupil Personnel and Accounting. 

d. Measurements. 

\. Organization and Administration. 

a. High School Administration, at least 3 quarter hours 

required, 
t Elementary School Administration, at least 3 quarter 

hours required, 
c General Administration. 

d. School Plant. 

e. Staff Personnel. 

f. Community Relations. 

b. Electives 27 quarter hours 

B. Secondary School Subject. 

1. Subject matter in the certificate fields 18 quarter hours 

2. Education 9 quarter hours 

3. Electives 18 quarter hours 

C. Elementary Education. 

1. Academic work 9 quarter hours 

2. Education 9 quarter hours 

3. Electives 27 quarter hours 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Significance of course numbers: 
For Freshmen 1 to 99, Sophomores 100 to 199, Juniors 200 to 299, 
Seniors 300 to 399, Graduate students 400 to 499. 



ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION 

Mr. Henderson and Mr. Adams 

318. Classroom organization and Control. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Topics: modern methods of management; general problens of 
discipline and punishment; grading and promotion; sttend- 
ance; daily program; records and reports; State laws thxt affect 
the school ; relation of the school to the county and state as 
administrative units; certification and salary schedue; teach- 
er's code of ethics; and State and National Teachen' Associa- 
tions. 

330. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. 

Aim: to drill students in manipulation of educational data 

for purposes of interpretation. 

Topics: tabular and graphic methods; measures of central 

tendency, variability, and relationships; norms; T-score; B- 

score; and principles of sampling. 

Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

405. Administration of the Elementary School. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with such topics as: selection and training 
of teachers; the place of the teacher in the administrative 
program; child accounting; school discipline and its rela- 
tion to administration; and the general relation of the ele- 
mentary school to the community. 

406. The Elementary School Principal. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For those preparing to be elementar/ school principals. 
Topics: personality and training of the principal; adminis- 
trative and supervisory duties; relation to the county; manage- 
ment of his office; division of his time. 



Coubses of Instruction 77 

407. Budgets and Accounting for Public Schools. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for school principals. 

Topics: sources, management, and expenditure of school rev- 
enue; value of community property; indebtedness and taxa- 
tion; growth of school population and cost per capita; and 
other data necessary for intelligent budget-making and ac- 
counting. 

408. Public School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for school principals and supervisors. 
Topics: development of administrative units of our public 
school systems; boards of education; relation of superintend- 
ent to the school and the public; preparation, tenure, and 
promotion of teachers; publicity and education of the public; 
pupil accounting and records. 

409. High School Administration. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course treats such topics as : the selection and training of 
the teaching staff; the place of the teacher in the high school 
administrative program; pupil accounting; pupil guidance; 
curricular offerings and organization; extra-curricular activities 
and their relation to the school program; and the relation of 
the high school to the community. 

421. Curricula for Public Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students preparing to meet the State's requirements 
for principals and supervisors of elementary schools. 
Topics: needs for curricula revision; principles of curriculum 
revision; tendencies in the organization of elementary and 
high school subjects; type studies. 
Open to graduate students. 

426. Theories of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of students preparing to meet the State's requirements 

for principals and supervisors of elementary schools. 

Topics : European and American movements and influences from 

Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Herbart, Mann, Parker, 

Dewey and others, who are directly and indirectly responsible 

for modern educational theory and practices in the elementary 

and high schools. 

Open to graduate students. 



78 East Carolina Teachers College 

428. Supervision of Instruction. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students preparing to meet the State's requirements 
for principals and supervisors. 

Topics: functions of the supervisor; ways and means of pro- 
moting better classroom teaching; adaptation of course of 
study to special needs of community; relation of supervisor and 
teacher; technique of criticism. 
Open to graduate students. 

429. Instructional Problems of the Unadjusted Child. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course makes a detailed study of the problems of the 
unadjusted child ; diagnosis of particular difficulties and appli- 
cation of remedial measures. 

430. Educational Statistics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Designed for prospective principals and supervisors. Continu- 
ation of Administration and Supervision 330. 
Topics: partial correlations, multiple correlations, linear regres- 
sions, use of normal probability curve to interpret data; weigh- 
ing scores; comparing groups; tabulations, etc. 
Prerequisite: Educational Statistics 330. 

431. Apprentice Work in Administration and Supervision. 

Six hours a week. Credit: ithree quarter hours. 
Designed for all those preparing to be principles or supervisors. 
Each student in this course is assigned to a principal or super- 
visor as an assistant in actually doing the work the student will 
be required to do as a principal or supervisor. Each student is 
required to attend conferences between the principal and his 
staff, the supervisor and his teachers, and any other meetings 
held for groups of teachers, supervisors, or principals. 
Open to graduate students. 

432. Training Teachers in Service. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For prospective principals and supervisors. 
Topics: evaluation of the different types of in-service training, 
study groups, conference groups, extension groups, teachers' 
meetings, county and state associations, reading clubs, experi- 
mental teaching. 



Courses of Instruction 79 

ART EDUCATION 

Miss Lewis and Miss Powers 

1. Art Education in the Primary Grades. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Required of majors in primary education. 

Creative drawings, composition, graphic vocabulary, color and 

picture study for the primary grades. 

3. Art Education in the Grammar Grades. 

Fall and winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Required of majors in grammar-grade education. 

Color, composition, creative drawings, paper-cut letters and 

picture study for the grammar grades. 

15a. Color and Design. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen majoring in home economics. 
An orientation course in the field of design. Underlying prin- 
ciples of good design and color relationships are studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on individual expression and development of 
appreciation through a variety of creative experiences. 

15b. Color and Design. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course is a continuation of Art Education 15a. The aim of 
the course is to develop a more sensitive and practical apprecia- 
tion of the place of art in an industrial society. Opportunity is 
given for creative expression stressing the relation between 
material, function, and design. Exploratory experiences in 
metal, weaving, leather, block printing, and ceramics. 

102. Art Education in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in primary education. Manuscript writing, 

bookbinding, creative work, and picture study. 

104. Art Education for Grammar Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This course is planned to familiarize the student with the field 



80 East Carolina Teachers College 

of modern art education. It is based on the recognition of art 
as an integral part of life. Children's needs, interests, and 
activities are studied as a fundamental background for pro- 
cedures. 

109. Basketry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. 

119. Freehand Drawing. Perspective. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The principles of perspective as applied to mathematics and 

science are emphasized. 

208. Crafts for Grammar Grades. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

Elective for majors in grammar-grade education. 

This course makes use of all principles previously taught in 

Art Education 3 and 104, and applies them to various crafts. 

Clay, bookbinding, weaving, simple woodwork, and other 

crafts as time permits. 

Prerequisites: Art Education 3 and 104 — or their equivalent. 

218. Art Appreciation. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 
Elective. 

A brief survey course in painting, sculpture, architecture, and 
the minor arts. Emphasis placed on appreciation and its cul- 
tural value. Modern Art will be studied in order to gain an 
understanding of contemporary art. The function of art in 
modern industrial design will be considered. 
There will be trips to the local Federal art gallery to study 
original art forms. 

220. Commercial Design. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. 

The application of lettering, design, and color principles to 

advertising, posters, and selected forms of commercial art. A 

study of typography, printing, and the alphabet in all ages with 



Courses of Instruction 81 

special emphasis on modern tendencies in publicity. Problems 
include labels, signs, illustrations, bookplates, cartoons, and 
posters. 

221. Art Education in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in primary education. 

This course is a continuation of Art Education 1 and 102. 

Water colors and finger paint are used. Clay work and crafts 

•for the primary grades. 

230. Free Expression. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course provides opportunities for exploration and experi- 
mentation with various art media such as clay, water color, oil, 
charcoal, pastel, and pencil, as a basis of growth in creative self 
expression. Basic principles of composition are studied in rela- 
tion to design elements of line, dark and light, form, color, and 
texture. 

301. Art in the Integrated Program. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For primary and grammar grade majors. 
This course gives the underlying philosophy of art as related 
to the integrated program. It emphasizes teaching through 
the interests of children as opposed to formal isolated art 
lessons. Accredited courses of study in art education are ex- 
amined and evaluated. Minimum essentials of art are discussed. 
Units of study and their related art activities are planned for 
specific grades. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

Me. Browning, Miss Ellis, Miss Lowe, Miss Dempsey, 
and Miss Bellamy 

1. Beginning Typewriting. 
Six laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
A one-term course in touch typewriting for personal use. Drills 
are used to develop facility, accuracy, and the complete mastery 
of the keyboard in the shortest possible time. Instruction in 



82 East Carolina Teachers College 

letter writing, centering problems, and manuscript typing. A 

speed of fifteen words a minute is required for credit in this 

course. 

Students whose high school transcripts show credit for one year 

of typewriting must have special permission in order to receive 

credit for this course. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

2. Intermediate Typewriting. 
Six laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 
A continuation of beginning typewriting. Drills to improve 
accuracy and speed. Advanced letter writing and other business 
forms. A speed of thirty words a minute is required for credit 
in this course. Students whose high school transcripts show 
credit for two years of typewriting must have special permis- 
sion in order to receive credit for this course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

3. Advanced Typewriting. 

Six laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
The aim of this course is to teach the most advanced business 
forms and to develop the highest speed possible for each indi- 
vidual student. A speed of forty words a minute is required for 
credit in this course. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

104. Advanced Typewriting. 

Six laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

Completion of the manual and advanced drill practice which 

will aid the student in acquiring both accuracy and speed. A 

speed of fifty words a minute is required for credit in this 

course. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

106. Office Machines. 

Two laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: one quarter hour. 

Calculator and adding-listing machine course. The student may 

use any of the following machines: Comptometer, Burroughs' 



Courses of Instruction 83 

key-driven calculator, Burroughs adding-listing machine, Mon- 
roe calculator, or Victor adding-listing machine. Business edu- 
cation majors are given preference in assigning machines. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

107. Office Machines. 

Two laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: one quarter hour. 
Continuation of Business Education 106. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

108. Office Machines. 

Two laboratory hours a week. 
Credit: one quarter hour. 

Mimeographing course. This course includes instruction in the 
use of the Mimeograph machine, the Mimeoscope and stencil cut- 
ting. 

Prerequisite: two quarters of touch typewriting. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

110. Introduction to General Business Principles. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
This course has been planned especially for students in other 
departments who want to elect a course in business education. 
The course also provides a background for the study of other 
business subjects. 

Topics: the handling of business papers; introduction to office 
machines; the proper use of banking facilities; the handling of 
negotiable instruments; filing; problems of communication and 
travel such as the use of the telephone, telegraph service, postal 
service, express and freight services, passenger transportation 
services, and services to travelers. 

114. Beginning Shorthand. 

Fall quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

Mastery of Part I of the Functional Method of Gregg Manual 

with attention given to developing reading and writing skills. 

Students whose high school transcripts show credit for one 

year of shorthand must have special permission in order to 

receive credit for this course. 



84 East Cabollxa Teachers College 

115. Intermediate Shorthand. 

Winter quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Required of all business education majors. 
Mastery of Part II, Functional Method Gregg Manual. The 
development of skill in taking new-matter dictation is stressed. 
Students whose high school transcripts show credit for two 
years of shorthand must hare special permission in order to 
receive credit for this course. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 1 and 114. 

116. Advanced Shorthand. 

Spring quarter. Six laboratory hours a week Credit: three 

quarter hours. Required of all business education majors. 

A review and completion of the principles of the Gregg Manual. 

Introduction to transcription at the typewriter. A speed of 

sixty words a minute is required for credit in this course. 

Prerequisite: Business Education 2 and 115. 

Laboratory fee, §1.00. 

130. Principles of Accounting. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
The following fundamentals of accounting are discussed: the 
balance sheet, statement of profit and loss, ledger accounts, 
proprietorship accounts, bookkeeping procedures, adjusting and 
closing entries, books of original entry, and controlling ac- 
counts. Laboratory problems to illustrate. A practice set for 
proprietorship is used. Three extra hours per week required in 
the accounting laboratory. 

131. Principles of Accounting. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

A study of interest and discount, valuation accounts, accrued 
and deferred items, the periodic summary, business practice 
and procedure, routine, recording, and partnerships. A practice 
set for a partnership is used. Three extra hours per week re- 
quired in the accounting laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 130. 

132. Principles of Accounting. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

The course includes such topics as: nature and characteristics 



CoiTBSES OF InsTBTJCTION 85 

of a corporation, corporate accounting, the voucher system, and 
cost accounting for manufacturing. A practice set for a corpora- 
tion is used. Three extra hours per week required in the 
accounting laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 131. 

1'3'd. Principles of Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is a review of the fundamental principles of 

accounting. 

The class will choose the sets to be worked from the following 

list: automobile dealer set, physician's set, commission set, 

governmental accounting set, sporting-goods set, and farm set. 

Three extra hours per week are required in the accounting 

laboratory. 

214. Secretarial Science. 

Fall quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 
Dictation course. Intensive practice in reading and dictation, 
with emphasis on transcription. Instruction in secretarial 
practice. A speed of eighty words a minute is required for 
credit in this course. 

Prerequisites: Business Education 3, 116 or equivalent, Eng- 
lish 1, 2, 3, 222. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

215. Secretarial Science. 

Winter quarter. Six laboratory hours a week Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

Dictation course. A continuation of Business Education 214. 

A speed of 100 words a minute is required for credit in this 

course. 

Prerequisites : Business Education 3 and 214. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

218. Office Management. 

Spring Quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all business education majors. 

This course is designed to train students to be able to meet the 

situations which will confront them when they enter a modern 

business office. The course includes an introduction to the use 



86 East Carolina Teachers College 

of dictation and transcribing machines and instruction in 

filing. 

A continuation of Business Education 215 but does not contain 

dictation work when offered in the summer session. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

223a. Materials and Methods of the Teaching of Bookkeeping, 

General Business and Business Law. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
Credited as Education 223be. 
Prerequisites: Business Education 110, 132, 231. 

223h. Materials and Methods of the Teaching of Typewriting, 

Shorthand and Office Practice. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
Credited as Education 223be. 
Prerequisites: Business Education 3, 116. 

230. Federal Tax Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the special problems involved in the accounting for 

income taxes, the capital stock tax, the gift tax, the estate tax, 

the excess profits tax, and social security taxes. 

A practice set is used which gives the student an opportunity 

to prepare government forms. 

231. Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
This course includes a discussion of law and its administration, 
property rights, torts, contracts, agency, rights of employer and 
employee, negotiable instruments, suretyship and insurance. 

232. Business Law. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Topics: bailments, carriers, sales, partnerships, corporations, 
deeds of conveyance, mortgages, landlord and tenant, and busi- 
ness crimes. 

322 a. b. c. Apprenticeship in Business Education. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Six hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

Open to business education majors of junior or senior standing. 
This course is designed as an elective in business education. 



Coueses of Instruction 87 

The student will be required to do supervised work in one of 
the following situations : office work in an approved down town 
or college office; retail selling in an approved store; or super- 
vision of accounting laboratories. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

'One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of all business education majors. 
Credited as Education 324be. 

333. Advanced Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of advanced accounting problems including: cash and 
receivables, inventories, investments, fixed assets, intangibles, 
capital stock, surplus, correction of errors, actuarial science, 
receiverships, and statement of application of funds. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 

340. Cost Accounting. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is of value to those who intend to teach accounting. 
The student who plans to do public or private accounting work 
will find the course helpful. 

Topics: method of collecting costs of material, labor, and over- 
head; perpetual inventories; legal phases of cost accounting; 
cost accounting for departments and branches. A manufactur- 
ing set is a part of the required work. Three extra hours per 
week required in the accounting laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Business Education 132. 

341. Salesmanship. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Open to juniors and seniors. 

A course for prospective teachers of salesmanship and students 

who expect to do actual selling. 

Topics: selling problems of employers; the relation between 

salesmen and employer; the selling talk; types of customers; 

creating desire, answering objections, arousing interest. 

Actual selling experience in the stores of Greenville is a part 

of this course. 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Adams, Miss Coates, Miss Charlton, Mr. Haynes, Mb. Hender- 
son, Me. McGinnis, Miss Newell, and Miss Wahx 

1. Introduction to Education. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



88 East Carolina Teachers College 

Open to freshmen only. Upperclassmen see advisers for substi- 
tute course for Education 1. 

The purpose of his course is to orient the prospective teacher 
in the field of education. To a certain extent, the instructors 
select the topics that they find the varying groups of freshmen 
need. 

Such individual problems as the development of effective study 
habits, improvement of reading skills, and the problems of ad- 
justment are given first consideration. The following general 
topics are covered: the organization of our American public 
school system, current tendencies, contemporary problems, and 
educational activities which seem most promising today. 

104. Beading in the Primary School. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students working for the primary certificate. 
Topics: reading retardation in school; the reading process; 
trends in reading instruction; reading readiness; a reading 
program for the grades ; initial reading activities ; the teaching 
of silent and oral reading; and the use of the reading center in 
the primary classroom. Class activities include observation in 
the laboratory school, oral and written reports, and the making 
of chart stories. 

201-2-3. Contemporary Education. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour each. 
Elective for Juniors and Seniors. 

The group meets not less than ten times per quarter and attend- 
ance at all meetings is necessary for credit. 
Not more than twenty students are permitted to enroll in this 
course for any one quarter. 

In this course each student is expected to select some topic of 
current interest in education and discuss it satisfactorily before 
the group. Credit is given without examination. 

205*. Reading in the Primary School. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students working for the primary certificate. 
A continuation of 104. Word recognition techniques; evaluation 
of the most desirable reading materials in the light of physical 
make-up as well as content; evaluation of materials and activ- 
ities for the indirectly supervised period, and a demonstration 
of the Metronoscope and the Betts' Telebinocular. 



Courses of Instruction 89 

Class activities include observation in the laboratory school 
and the preparation of bulletin board material and notices. 
Prerequisite: Education 104 or its equivalent. 

206. Language in the Primary Grades. 

Required of all students working for the Primary Certificate. 
Topics: Language objectives in the Primary grades; relation- 
ship of language to the child's physical, social, and emotional 
growth; factors affecting the child's language development; 
the use of curriculum material — with special emphasis on poems 
and stories; the teaching of writing and spelling. 
Collecting objective material for use with children is an im- 
portant part of this course. Frequent observations in the Train- 
ing School are provided. 

223. Methods of Teaching in the High School. 

Two quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours each term. 

Required of all students working for the high school certificate. 
A student preparing to teach special subjects in the high school 
is required to take high school methods in the department of 
his major subject. For further particulars see the methods 
courses outlined in detail under the departments and numbered 
223. 

231-2-3. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the Primary 
Grades. 
Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to give the student insight into 
some of the aspects of teaching. Through directed observation 
and participation, the student comes to a better understanding 
of the child, and his reaction to the teaching situation. Induc- 
tion into teaching takes place gradually. Regular conferences 
with the supervising teacher are given over to the analysis and 
evaluation of the work observed, and to the discussion of the 
problems encountered by the student teacher. This course is 
planned to help the student discover her teaching potentialities. 

234-5-6-7. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the Gram- 
mar Grades. 
Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of all grammar-grade majors. 

During the first part of this course students observe their train- 
ing supervisor teach, work with grade materials, participate in 
certain schoolroom activities, gradually working up to actual 
teaching which they will do the latter part of the quarter. 



90 East Carolina Teachers College 

248. Reading in the Grammar Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all students working for grammar grade certificate. 
The purpose of this course is to make a study of: the present 
tendencies in reading; the primary background essential for 
success at the grammar grade level; the major objectives of 
oral and silent reading; the uses of the different types of read- 
ing; the abilities to be acquired during this period; the evalua- 
tion and selection of appropriate material; and ways of 
handling these. 

306. Social Sciences in the Primary Grades. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

The purpose of this course is to show child development through 

social science experiences. 

Topics: ways the social sciences develop; content of the social 

sciences; arrangement of environment conducive to children's 

social growth; participating in making records of children's 

social science curriculum in action; and making studies of 

play materials, books, pictures, and stories. 

307. The Primary School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Senior elective. 

Emphasis is laid on the professional growth necessary if the 
prospective teacher is to make a success in this field. 
This course consists of observations in the laboratory school 
followed by readings in primary education for the purpose of 
evaluating classroom activities; conducting teacher-pupil con- 
ferences; studying the curriculum; and discovering what may 
be expected of the child during and at the close of this period. 

308. Story Telling. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Senior elective. 

This course includes a study of the fundamental principles of 
story telling, the technique of telling stories, and the selection 
of stories suitable for each of the primary grades. Some atten- 
tion to the selection of stories for other groups is given. 
In this course much actual practice in telling stories to groups 
of children is given. 
Throughout the course good speech habits will be stressed. 



Courses of Instruction 91 

315. Directed Observation in the Elementary School. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Limited Registration. 

This course is planned for those who wish guidance in the 
observation of good teaching. Students will observe in groups 
and individually. Observations in the Training School will be 
followed by discussions in which analysis and evaluation in 
terms of fundamental principles will be made. Students will be 
directed in readings relating to their individual problems. 

316. Problems of the Primary Teacher. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students working for the primary certificate. 
All students in the primary practice teaching group meet with 
the supervisor of the primary grades and discuss some of the 
problems they meet in their practice teaching. Discussion of 
these problems includes reports from professional books, maga- 
zines, and other sources. Observation in the laboratory school is 
a part of this course. 

317. Problems of the Grammar Grade Teacher. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all students working for the grammar-grade 

certificate. 

All students in the grammar-grade practice teaching group meet 

with the supervisor of the grammar grades and discuss some of 

the problems in their respective grades. Discussion of these 

problems from professional books, magazines, and other sources 

are reported on by individuals in class, and when advisable the 

class observes in the laboratory school. 

318. School Organization and Control. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course is the same as 318 in the Department of Adminis- 
tration and Supervision. 
Open to seniors only. 

320. Visual Aids in Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective. Open to juniors and seniors. 

The purpose of this course is to aid teachers in utilizing the 
more important types of visual materials, including slides, 
prints, and the motion picture. Particular attention is given to 



92 East Carolina Teachers College 

the problem of selection and the integration of these materials 
in the school program. 

Students are given instruction in the operation of equipment 
and the preparation of materials. 

322. History of Education in the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all four-year primary and grammar-grade students. 
This course considers the significant phases in the development 
of education in the United States from the Colonial foundation 
to the present time. Great American educators and their contri- 
butions are stressed. Attention is directed to outstanding cur- 
rent problems in education which are demanding solution and 
an aggressive attitude toward these problems is encouraged. 

324. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the High School. 
Two quarters are required of each high school major. 

(This teaching is regularly done one quarter in each major 

field, but by special arrangements both quarters can be done in 

the same field.) 

Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 

This course is represented in the high school departments 

under the No. 324. 

325. Principles of Secondary Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The course considers the present problems of secondary educa- 
tion, curricula, aims in high school education, organization and 
administration, and summarizes in a general way the other 
courses in secondary education. 

339. Directed Observation in the Elementary School. 
Two hours a week. 

Two hours credit. Required of all Primary and Grammar majors 
as a prerequisite to practice teaching. 

The purpose of this course is to prepare students for practice 
teaching. Through directed observations of children and teach- 
ers at work in the Training School the student will be better 
prepared for her student teaching during the following quarter. 
Toward the end of the quarter the student's observations will 
be confined to the grade in which she will do her practice 
teaching. 

341-2-3. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the Primary 
Grades. 
Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to give students actual teaching 



Courses of Instbtjction 93 

experience. A conference with the critic teacher is given over 
to the findings of the observation work and to a free discussion 
of the handling of school problems encountered by the student 
teacher. To be eligible for this course one must have made a 
general grade average of three on all his courses and must have 
passed the spelling and handwriting tests. To enter this course 
one must make written application to the Supervisor of Pri- 
mary Supervised Teaching. This application goes to the Reg- 
istrar for approval or disapproval. The applicant will be notified 
of the disposition of his application. 

344-5-6-7. Observation and Supervised Teaching in the Gram- 
mar Grades. 

Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 

Required of all grammar-grade majors. 

Prerequisite: Education 234-5-6-7 or equivalent. 

In this course the student teaches several subjects to the 

class as a whole and during the quarter probably teaches the 

whole class the entire day for one or more days. 

400 a.b.c. Seminar. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six quarter hours. 
For graduate students only. 

In this course each student, under the direction and guidance 
of his adviser, presents at least one problem or subject each 
quarter. These problems are to be discussed and each student is 
supposed to take the lead in the discussion of his problem. 
Problems are to be chosen from major fields. The study of the 
problem must show original research or original organization 
on the part of the student presenting it. 

405. Investigations in the Teaching of Beading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to graduate students only. 

The course consists in making an analytical study of researches 
that have been reported on the various phases of the teaching of 
reading. The child's difficulties in becoming familiar with the 
reading processes, the teaching difficulties in the subject, re- 
medial work designed for the child's benefit, and a critical 
evaluation of the research studies with special reference to the 
psychological principles involved and the educational implica- 
tions to be derived are given serious consideration in this course. 



94 East Carolina Teacheks College 

412. Improvement of Reading Instruction in the Primary 
Grades. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned for teachers of experience. Individual 
teaching problems will be given consideration. 
Topics: Factors conditioning children's success in reading; a 
study of the experiences of children which affect their reading 
interests; the utilization of these interests in the acquiring of 
desirable reading attitudes, habits, and skills; evaluation of 
methods of teaching reading, and materials characteristic of 
current practice. Demonstrations of the telebinocular and 
other mechanized reading aids are a part of this course. 
There will be observations in the Training School. 

416. Problems of the Primary Teacher. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a problem course. It is planned for experienced teachers 
who wish to work on some specific problem or problems in their 
respective fields. Each student will have the opportunity to 
make an intensive study of his problem in its relation to the 
school program. There will be regularly scheduled observa- 
tions in the Training School provided for the members of the 
class. 

417. Study of Some of the Major Problems of the Grammar 

Grades. 
The student will distribute the working time each week as 
follows : A minimum of two hours observation in the Training 
School, two hours library work, two hours group conference a 
week, and three hours a week in conference with the in- 
structor. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The class divides into working committees with a chairman 
and a secretary. Each committee schedules its own time and 
place for meetings. Each student selects some major problem 
or problems with which he wants to work. A list of these prob- 
lems is given to the teacher for evaluation before the student 
begins work on them. 

Reports are to be presented both orally to the whole group, and 
to the teacher in writing with complete records of individual 
and group activities attached. The chairman of each group 
keeps a check on attendance for individuals in his group. 
jPre-observation conference with the critic teachers is necessary 
before observing in the room. The groups meet the critic 
teachers in conference following the observations. 



Courses of Instruction 95 

420. Visual Aids in Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
For teachers and administrators who wish to make use of 
objective teaching aids, including the school journey, slides, 
prints, and the motion picture. Available materials in these 
fields are surveyed and attention given to the problem of selec- 
tion and integrated use in the school program. 
Sources of supply for all materials and projection apparatus, 
and care of materials and equipment will be considered. A 
survey of literature in this field will be made. 

422. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course takes up the historical development of the prin- 
ciples and practices of education from the earliest times to the 
present. Education as an expression of the aims of life for the 
individual and social group is studied. 

423. History and Philosophy of Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Education 422. 

426. Modern Trends in Secondary Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The purpose of this course is to make an analytical study of the 

shifts and changes of emphasis current in the field of secondary 

education. 

Trends as they are found (a) in current educational literature; 

(b) in changing emphasis observable in curriculum materials; 

and (c) in current beliefs as to the functions of the junior high 

school and the junior college. Special effort is directed to the 

philosophical antecedents of educational practice. 

427. The Beginning and Development of Secondary Education 

in the United States. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Elective for seniors. 

This course traces the transfer of the secondary school from 

its origin in Europe to the United States; its early beginnings 

as a private or semi-private institution here; its development 

into a tax-supported institution; and its rapid growth and 

devolpment since 1900. 



96 East Carolina Teachers College 

ENGLISH 

Miss Turner, Mr. Baughan, Miss Greene, Miss Grigsby, Miss 
Hooper, Miss Jenkins, Mr. Posey 

1. Composition. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen. 

An intensive study of the fundamentals of English in an attempt 
to discover and correct weaknesses in speaking and writing; a 
review of grammar, punctuation, capitalization, note-taking, the 
use of the library, elementary outlining, and writing short 
themes. Each student is expected to own a standard collegiate 
dictionary for use in this course and in English 2 and 3. 

2. Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all freshmen. 

Word-study, sentence and paragraph structure, letter-writing, 

and descriptive and narrative writing, with some practice in 

such other specialized forms as hook reviewing and news 

writing. 

3. Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all freshmen. 

Topics for half the term: writing simple essays, making short 
talks of a practical nature, and reading aloud; for the other 
half of the term : selecting an appropriate topic, reading, taking 
notes, making a bibliography, preparing topical and sentence 
outlines, and finally writing a source theme. 

107. Children's Literature. 

Fall and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Required of majors in primary education. 
A content course with emphasis on the types of most interest 
to children in the lower grades, but covering the field of chil- 
dren's literature. Careful study of selections representative of 
each type, and wide reading. 

110. American Literature. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of majors in English, primary education, and gram- 
mar-grade education. 

A survey of American literature from its beginnings to about 
1870. Collateral reading required. 



Courses of Instruction 97 

131. American Literature. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of majors in English, primary education, and gram- 
mar-grade education. 
A continuation of English 110, bringing the survey to 1900. 

112a. English Literature. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in English. 

A survey of English literature, beginning with Chaucer and 

ending with the publication of the Lyrical Ballads in 1798. 

Collateral reading required. 

112b. English Literature. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of majors in English. 

A continuation of course 112a, bringing the survey to 1900. 

113. Literature for the Grammar Grades. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Required of majors in grammar-grade education. 
A comprehensive survey of the field of literature on the gram- 
mar-grade level. An intensive study of the types emphasized 
with examples of each, and wide parallel reading, and guidance 
in book selection for individuals and for grade libraries. 

114, 115<, 116. The Bible as Literature. 

Fall, winter, spring. One hour a week. Credit for each course: 
one quarter hour. Elective. 

Study of literary types: proverbs, prose narrative, oration, 
essay, sermon, and poem. 

117. Parliamentary Law. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

Elective. Offered once a year. 

Study and practice in parliamentary procedure. 

118. Debating. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Elective. Offered once a year. 
Study and practice in debating. 



98 East Carolina Teachers College 

204. English in the Grammar Grades : Language — Composition. 
Fall and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. Prerequisite: English 222. 
Required of majors in grammar-grade education. 
A course that aims to familiarize the student with the standards 
and content of language-composition on the grammar-grade 
level; and to present principles of, and give practical training 
in, teaching language through activity curricula in which 
language is functional for real needs and in which the normal 
opportunities are provided for creative writing. 

206. English in the Grammar Grades : Reading — Literature. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective for grammar-grade, primary, and English majors. 
Analysis of reading problems: diagnosis of reading troubles 
and remedial measures; study of the various types of materials 
and reading requirements for each; practical work in reading 
in units for establishing good work habits and for building up 
backgrounds for literature. 

213. Advanced Composition. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of English majors. 

Practice in various forms of writing, along with the study of 

models. Correctness and development of individual style 

stressed. 

214. a.b.c. Laboratory Courses in Composition. 

Fall, winter, spring respectively. Credit for each course: one 
quarter hour. 

Elective for a limited number of students. Selection to be made 
on the basis of grades, ability to stand an aptitude test, and 
marked interest in practical writing. Of special value to mem- 
bers of the newspaper staff and to majors in English interested 
in journalism in high school. Practical forms of writing, such 
as news, feature stories, editorials, book reviews, and bulletins. 
Laboratory method that gives each student individual attention 
and practical experience in the kind of writing in which he is 
most interested. 

216a. High School Literature. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of English majors. 

A professionalized subject-matter course for the intensive study 
of some of the literary selections taught in junior high school. 



Courses of Instruction 99 

216b. High School Literature. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of English majors. 

A continuation of 216a, except that the literature studied is for 

senior high school. 

218. Oral English. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of primary, grammar-grade, and home-economics 
majors. 

A course planned to develop good habits of speech and the 
ability to talk well before a group. Drills given to correct the 
common errors in grammar and to establish correct pronuncia- 
tion and clear enunciation. Emphasis placed on effective oral 
reading, short-topic discussion, and participation in meetings. 

219. World Masterpieces in Translations. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Elective. 

A reading course in superior translations of a number of 

classical and modern masterpieces of continental Europe. 

222. English Grammar. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of majors in English, grammar-grade education, and 

home economics. 

223. The Teaching of English in High School. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of English majors. (See Education 223.) 
Principles and methods of teaching literary and composition 
types; some attention to the activities of major organizations, 
publishing houses, and teachers in the field; some practice in 
the examination and evaluation of textbooks, professional 
writings, maps, pictures, and other helps. 

224. The Forms of Poetry. 

Winter quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

Elective. 

A study of meter, stanzaic forms, figures of speech, and rhyme, 

with special emphasis on harmony of form and content. 



100 East Carolina Teachers College 

225. The Short Story. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of many representative examples, with some attention 

to the history of the short story as a distinct literary type. 

230. Dramatic Reading of Plays. 

One two-hour laboratory period a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

Elective. 

A course in presenting dramas by reading aloud. Valuable 

especially for English majors, other students interested in 

current dramas, and participants in dramatic and literary clubs. 

250. Field Trip in American Literary Backgrounds. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Elective. Open to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. 

A travel-study course in the New England States: visits to the 

homes of Poe, Irving, Longfellow, Emerson, Lowell, Thoreau, 

Whittier, and Hawthorne; lectures on the writing of these 

authors as influenced by their backgrounds; required readings 

and written reports. 

314. Modern Drama. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. Open to seniors and graduate students only. Offered in 

alternate years. 

A study of representative modern dramatists — Maeterlinck, 

Hauptmann, Galsworthy, Barrie, Shaw, O'Neill, and a number 

of others — with some attention to types and movements. 

315. The Novel. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the development of the Englsh novel, the following 
novelists being considered through lectures and critical discus- 
sion: Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Smollett, Sterne, Johnson, 
Goldsmith, Jane Austen, Thackeray, Dickens, George Eliot, the 
Brontes, Trollope, Hardy, Meredith, Barrie, Hawthorne, James, 
Howells, and Mark Twain. Parallel reading required. 



Courses of Instruction 101 

317. The Essay. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective. Open to seniors and graduate students only. Offered 
in alternate years. 

A survey of the history of the essay and a study of the various 
types. Collateral reading required. 

319. Modern Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. Open to seniors and graduate students only. Offered in 

alternate years. 

A survey of American and English poetry from 1900 to the 

present time, including a study of the poetic movements and 

contemporary trends of the major poets, and representative 

poems. 

320. Modern Prose. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. Offered in alternate years. 

A survey of the novel, biography, short story, and the essay in 

American and English literature since 1900, with discussion of 

the best writers in each field, and wide reading. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of English majors. (See Education 324e.) 
Directed observation; frequent conferences with critic teacher 
and supervisor; participation in class and, when possible, in 
extra-curricular activities; practice teaching. 

325. Shakespeare. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of English majors. 

Ten or more plays of Shakespeare studied and discussed in 

class. 

326. Romantic Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Elective. Open to seniors and graduate students only. Pre- 
requisite: English 112b. Offered in alternate years. 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats emphasized. 
Some attention to lesser contemporaries. 



102 East Carolina Teachers College 

327. Victorian Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Elective. Offered in alternate years. 

A study of the work of the leading poets of the Victorian Era — 
Arnold, dough, Mrs. Browning, the Rossettis, Morris, Swin- 
burne, and others, with special emphasis on the poetry of 
Tennyson and Browning. 

330. High School Dramatics. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Elective. Recommended especially to English majors but 
open to others by permission of the instructor. 
A study of and practice in the elementary principles of pro- 
ducing plays, from the point of view of the high school teacher- 
director. 

331. Directing and Rehearsal of Plays. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Elective. Prerequisite: English 330, or equivalent. 
A study of various theories of directing and methods in re- 
hearsal. Attention is called to Industrial Arts 265, Stagecraft, 
and Home Economics 215, Costume Design. 

332. Acting and Interpretation. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Elective. Prerequisite: English 331, or equivalent. 

Interpretation of scenes from plays and study of theories of 

acting. 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
A study of bibliographical practice and method in connection 
with thesis writing. Advice as to suitable subjects for original 
research papers and round table discussions of finished products 
a necessary part of the work. 

405. Current Problems in the Teaching of English. 
Three hours a week. Credit : three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: English 220. 

A critical study of those statistical investigations, laboratory 
experiments, and philosophical writings which record the status 



Courses of Instruction 103 

and point out the needs and the prospects in the teaching of 
English. 

413. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Studies in English literature to 1750, selected by the instructor 
upon consultation with the students. 

414. Studies in English Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Studies in English literature from 1750 to 1900, selected by the 
instructor upon consultation with the students. 

415. Principles of Literary Criticism. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the theory and practice of critics, together with 
written criticisms of prose and poetry. 

416. Principles and Types of Poetry. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of versification and poetic types. 

417. Principles and Practice in Advanced Composition. 
One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisites: English 1, 2, 3, and 213. 

Daily themes; criticisms, editorials, book reviews, intimate 
essays, and related types. 

418. Studies in American Literature. 

One quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Studies in American literature selected by the instructor upon 
consultation with the students. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Mb. Peat, and Miss Austin 
FRENCH 

11. Grammar, Phonetics. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Open to all college students who have completed the high school 

requirements in French. 

Required of all students specializing in French. 

Phonetics, Grammar, and Reading. Special emphasis in this 

course is laid on pronunciation, the use of pronoun, vocabulary, 

and phonetics. 



104 East Carolina Teachers College 

12-13. Continuation of French 11. Grammar, Heading. 

Winter and Spring quarters, respectively. Three hours a week 
each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Required of students specializing in French. 
Emphasis is laid on vocabulary, pronunciation, regular con- 
jugation, and the more common irregular verbs. 

104-105. Reading, Grammar. 

Fall and Winter quarters, respectively. Three hours a week 

each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Required of students specializing in French. 

Grammar, vocabulary, reading, exercises based upon texts, 

with special emphasis on principles of grammar. 

106. Reading, Grammar Review. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of students specializing in French. 

Review of grammatical principles, regular and irregular verbs; 

dictation based upon texts. Reading. 

107. French Translation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Translation of French plays and short stories. 

Ill, 112, 113. Beginners' French. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Elective to any student who has not had a course in French. 

Freshmen who have had high school French should enroll in 

French 11. If a student who has not had French desires to 

major in this subject, credit on these courses will be allowed as 

free electives. 

These courses are intended to give the student ability to read 

simple French, to pronounce correctly, and to use the language, 

orally or written, within certain limits; and to give increased 

cultural interest in French and French civilization. 

114. Contributions of the Romance Languages to the English 
Vocabulary. 
One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Elective. No knowledge of Foreign Languages required. 
A course designed to show the relationship of these languages 
and to aid in vocabulary building. 



Coueses of Instetjction 105 

207-208. French Literature and Composition. 

One quarter each, respectively. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours each. 

Required of students specializing in French. 

Elements of French Literature; Reading; Analytical study of 

texts, illustrating grammatical principles, uses of pronouns and 

verbs. French exercises based upon texts. 

210. French Literature and Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of students specializing in French. 

211. Survey Course. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Lectures, translations, assigned readings and reports. 
The intent of this course is to give the student a general basis 
for more specific work in literature. 

212. Grammar and Phonetics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A review course in grammar and phonetics. 

214. Mythology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the more important myths and their appearance in 

literature. 

215-216-217. French. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
French commercial practice. These courses are especially de- 
signed for commercial students. 
Elective for French majors. 

218. Conversational French. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

219. Teaching Apprenticeship in French. 

Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with 
class routine and teaching techniques. A high school class in 
French will serve as a laboratory. 



106 East Carolina Teachers College 

223. The Teaching of French. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of students specializing in French. 

Prerequisite: 18 credits in French or Junior standing. 

The aim of this course is to give practical help towards meeting 

the problems arising in teaching French in the high schools; 

planning course of study, variety of process, reference books, 

aids to study. 

313-314. History of French Literature. 

Fall and Winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours each. 

316. French Poetry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

317. Advanced French Beading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
History of France in its relationship to French Literature. 

318. Advanced French Beading. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

319. Conversational French. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

320. Choses Francaises. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A general informational course on France and the French 
people, intending to give the teacher of the language a back- 
ground and fund of information useful in the teaching of 
French. 

321. The Novel. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the development of the French Novel during the 

nineteenth century. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of all students who are preparing to teach French in 
the high school. 



Courses of Instruction 107 

SPANISH 

II, 12, 13. Grammar. 

Three hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Open to all students who have completed the high school re- 
quirements in Spanish. 

Review of hasic principles of Spanish grammar. 
Drill in pronunciation, conversation, translation, vocabulary, 
and syntax. 

104, 105, 106. Beading. 

Three hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Study of Spanish plays and short stories. Emphasis on reading 
for comprehension. 

III, 112, 113. Beginners' Spanish. 

Three hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
Elective to any student who has not had a course in Spanish. 
Freshmen who have had high school Spanish should enroll in 
Spanish 11. 

206, 207, 208. Survey of Spanish Literature. 

Three hours a week each. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
A study of the general field of Spanish literature. 

212. Advanced Grammar and Composition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Concentrated review of grammar. Practice in composing letters 
in Spanish. Reference to newspapers and magazines written in 
Spanish. 

223. The Teaching of Spanish. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of students specializing in Spanish. 

Prerequisite: 18 quarter hours in Spanish or Junior standing. 

The aim of this course is to give practical help towards meeting 

the problems arising in teaching Spanish in the high schools; 

planning course of study, variety of process, reference books, 

aids to study. 

321. The Modern Spanish Novel. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the Spanish novel of the nineteenth and twentieth 

centuries. 



108 East Carolina Teachers College 

322. Spanish Prose of the Golden Age. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

327. Spanish Drama of the Golden Age. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of all students who are preparing to teach Spanish 
in the high school. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Mr. Picklesimer, Mr. Brown, Mb. Cummings 

Geography justifies its place in the curriculum on account of 
its practical utility and cultural value. The instruction in this 
department deals with the relations and adjustments of people 
to their natural environment. The courses announced here 
include several phases of the subject. 

10. Principles of Geography. 

Given as follows : Freshmen in the Fall, Grammar Grades in the 

Winter, and Primary Grades in the Spring. Three hours a 

week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A prerequisite for all other courses in Geography except 125, 

310, and 330. 

Geography 10 is the fundamental course of the department, and 

is designed for a serious study of geography of college grade. 

The first part of the course is devoted to an intensive study of 

the major principles of general geography. This is followed by 

a world-wide survey of the characteristics and distribution of 

climatic regions of the world, including their flora and fauna. 

11. Human Geography. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This course deals with the adjustments man makes to land 

forms, water bodies, climate, soils, and minerals. The basis of 

approach is through types. 

12. Economic Geography of the United States and Canada. 
Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



Courses of Instruction 109 

A study of the character of economic geography; the place and 
nature of agriculture; food resources; cereals, vegetables, fruits, 
animals, and fish; fundamentals of manufacturing; basic 
minerals, power; timbered areas and industries connected with 
the American forest; textile industries; leather and rubber; 
chemicals; mineral industries. Some instruction is given in 
the securing and presenting of geographic data. 

110. Geography of North. America. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A detailed study of the major natural geographic regions of 

North America: physiographic, climatic, and industrial. 

112. Geography of Europe. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This courses includes a study of the location, area, relief, cli- 
mate, and coasts of Europe. Emphasis is placed upon the opera- 
tion of geographic factors in the movement and distribution of 
peoples in the continent; the origin and development of Euro- 
pean civilization; and the economic and social development of 
European states. 

113. Economic Geography of Foreign Countries. 

Pall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit three quarter hours. 
A study of the industrial and commercial activities of the 
leading countries of the world, as influenced by geographic 
conditions; international commercial problems; examination 
and use of geographic data. 

125. General Geology. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit three quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of the origin of the earth, its 
history, geologic and physiographic features, and the forces 
active in modifying the rocks and surface of the land in 
present times. The student is taught to identify the common 
rocks. When possible a field trip is made into the Appalachian 
Mountains and the Great Valley. 

160. Geography of Representative Eegions. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A detailed study of the principal economic activities of five or 

six economic regions in the middle and low latitudes in various 



110 East Carolina Teacheks College 

parts of the world. Emphasis is placed upon types. This course 
is devised especially to assist grammar-grade teachers, and is 
not open to students majoring in other fields. 

210. Geography of South America. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course on the racial, economic, and political aspects of 
South American geography. Special attention is given to trade 
relations between this continent and the leading industrial 
nations of the world. 

211. Geography of Asia. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This course is a study of the physiographic, climatic and human 

use regions of Asia. Japan, China, Russia, and India are 

studied in considerable detail. 

212. Historical Geography of the United States. 

Fall and Winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

A study of some of the natural environmental conditions to 
which man has adjusted himself in the settlement and develop- 
ment of America. This course should be very helpful to teachers 
of geography, history, and the other social studies. 

215. Geography of Africa. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This is a continental study. In organization, it is similar to 

such geography courses as 110, 112, 210, and 211. 

221. Materials and Methods of Teaching Geography in the 
Grammar Grades. 

Credited as Education. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Principles of selection, organization, and presentation of 
geographic materials; illustrative geographic units for the 
various grade levels; fundamentals of technique in using pic- 
tures, maps, graphs, statistics, and other library materials in 
teaching geography. Some time is given to observation of 
geography teaching in the demonstration school. 



CoUESES OF INSTETJCTION 111 

230. Industrial Geography for Elementary Teachers. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course is especially designed to help elementary teachers 
to understand, and to interpret, the geography and the proc- 
essing of the more or less common-place products used by 
man. Sources of materials for teachers in service will be 
emphasized. 

250. Eield Course in Geography. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is concerned with the geography of the New 

England and Middle Atlantic States and the St. Lawrence 

Lowlands of the United States and Canada. 

A study of the relationship existing between the elements of 

the natural environment and man's activities : economic, social, 

and political. A first-hand study of geography itself; not a 

description of it. 

251. Field Course in Geography. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

A first-hand study of the geography of Florida and Western 
Cuba. Considerable emphasis is given to the vegetable and 
citrus fruit industries, the tobacco industries, and the Ever- 
glades. 

252. Eield Course in Geography. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the natural environmental conditions to which 
man has adjusted himself in the various physiographic, climatic, 
and economic regions of the American, South and the Central 
Plateau of Mexico. 

310. Conservation of Natural Resources. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

An intensive study of the conservation of the soil, minerals, 
•forests, water-ways and water-power of the United States, based 
upon a careful consideration of the natural resources. Frequent 
reference is made to the resources of foreign countries. Atten- 
tion is given also to the conservation and development of the 
resources of North Carolina. 



112 East Carolina Teachers College 

330. Peoples of the Earth. 
Credited as Education. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course provides the primary teacher with the background 
essential for good geography teaching in the fourth grade and 
for the stories with geographic setting used in the first, second, 
and third grades. Emphasis is placed upon the activities of 
peoples and their relationships to their natural environment. 
The following types are selected for study: peoples of the cold 
countries, the Eskimos; peoples of the deserts, the Arabs; 
peoples of the wet tropics, the natives of the Congo and Amazon 
Basins; peoples of the mountains, the Swiss; peoples of the 
temperate lowlands, the Dutch, etc. This course is open only 
to students majoring in primary work. 

410. Geography of World Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of current international problems in the light of their 
natural environmental setting. Emphasis is placed upon the 
following topics: geography and the evolution of nations; the 
expansion of Europe; European influence in world affairs; 
the British Empire and its many problems; geography and 
conflicting interests of the war-torn nations of Europe and 
Asia and their effects upon the United States. 
Prerequisite: Approval of the teacher in charge of the class. 

420. Geography of Latin America. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course has a three-fold purpose: first, to establish a bet- 
ter understanding and appreciation of the regions, countries, 
and products of Latin America; second, to survey the condi- 
tions that have retarded or promoted its progress; and, third, 
to point out the reciprocal relations between these areas and 
the United States in defense of the Western Hemisphere. 

430. Eeadings in Geography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a course of carefully supervised readings and discus- 
sions in the several phases of geography, and is intended both 
to broaden and intensify the student's interest in the subject. 

440. Climatology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The first part of the course is devoted to a rapid and intensive 

survey of climatic controls. This is followed by a study of the 



Courses of Instruction 113 

various climatic classifications, together with a comparison of 
the major climatic environments found in different parts of the 
world. The student will be directed in compiling, graphing, 
and mapping climatic data, and in interpreting the results. 
Prerequisite: Approval of the teacher in charge of the class. 

450. Geography of the South. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A detailed study of the influences of geography on the develop- 
ment of the several regions of the American South. From the 
basis of physical complex, through economic products, are 
traced the lines of force that determine the life and labor of 
the contemporary South in Cotton Belt and Piney Woods, Delta 
and Southern Highlands, Industrial Piedmont and Texas Oil 
Fields, Sugar Bowl and Fishing Fringe, Rice Zone, and Florida 
Subtropics. 
Prerequisite: approval of the teacher in charge of the class. 

460. Geography of the Orient. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
It is the purpose of this course to assist the student in under- 
standing the geography of eastern Asia in the light of the 
present world conflict. The approach is through a study of race, 
political and social customs; regions and their commodities; 
and types of industry and commerce. 

HISTORY 

Mb. Frank, Miss Davis, Me. Hilldrup, Mr. Hollar, and Miss Rose 

No student will he credited with more than one course of a 
general type covering the same period of any field of history. 
This statement does not refer to courses taken in high school. 

10. American History to 1783. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

11. American History, 1783 to 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

12. A m erican History since 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

21. Contemporary History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A course in current events. 

8 



114 East Carolina Teachebs College 

30. The Ancient World to 325 A.D. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of history majors. Not open to others. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

31. Medieval History, 325 A.D. to 1500 A.D. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of History majors. Not open to others. 

32. Modern History, 1500 to 1815. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of history majors. Not open to others. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

113. Ancient History to 325 A.D. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Not open to history majors and/or those who have credit for 

History 31. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

114. Medieval History, 325 to 1500. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Not open to history majors and/or those who have credit for 

History 31. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

115. Modern European History, 1500 to 1815. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. Not open 
to history majors and/or those who have credit for History 32. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

116. Modern European History, 1815 to 1914. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of history. 

130. American History to 1783. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of history majors. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

131. American History, 1783 to 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of history majors. 
Prerequisite: History major. 



Courses of Instruction 115 

132. American History since 1865. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of history majors. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

200. Topics in American History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

201. Topics in Ancient History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

202. Topics in Medieval History. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

203. Topics in Modern European History. 
One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A lecture course on selected topics. 

205. North Carolina History. 

For majors in elementary education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This is a general survey of the social, economic, and political 

history of North Carolina. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

208. Economic History of the United States to 1860. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of history or junior standing. 

209. Economic History of the United States since 1860. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 9 hours of history or junior standing. 

217. The War for Southern Independence. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of history. 

218. English History to 1603. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

219. English History since 1603. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 



116 East Carolina Teachers College 

221. Contemporary History. 

One lecture and four hours supervised reading a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

Each student is required to furnish a magazine or a newspaper 
that is satisfactory to the instructor each week. The newspapers 
and magazines become the property of the class. 

223. Materials and Methods in High School History. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

250. Field Trip to Northern United States and Canada. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

299. Economic History of Modern Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Modern European History. 

300. The American Revolution and Counter-Revolution — 1769- 

1789. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the growth of revolutionary sentiments and radical- 
ism, and the return to conservatism under the constitution. 
Prerequisite: 18 hours of history. 

301. Materials and Methods in Grammar-Grade History. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of history. 

317. Latin American History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite : 9 hours of history. 

323. Materials and Methods in Junior High School History. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 15 hours of history. 

324. Practice Teaching. 

Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 

325. North Carolina History for College Students. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course makes a study of the colonial period of the State. 
Prerequisite: 21 hours of history. 



Courses of Instruction 117 

326. North Carolina History. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course presents a detailed study of the nineteenth century- 
group of leaders of North Carolina, who were largely responsible 
for the social and economic life of the State today. 
Prerequisite: 21 hours of history. 

327. The Revolutionary Period in Europe. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: 25 hours of history or graduate standing and 18 
hours of history. 

330. Teaching Apprenticeship in History. 

Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with 

class routine and teaching technique. 

A high school class in History will serve as a laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Senior History major. 

400. a.b.c. Seminar. 

Three hours a week for three quarters. Credit: six quarter 

hours. 

Credited as Education 400 a.b.c. 

401. Europe since 1918. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

404. The Renaissance and the Reformation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

405. History of North Carolina since 1860. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

407. The Civil "War and Reconstruction. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

408. United States History since 1877. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 



118 East Carolina Teachers College 

410. Colonial Social and Cultural History. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

411. Ancient Imperialism. 

Three hours a week. Three credits. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

412. Formation of the Federal Union, 1781 to 1801. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

421. Cultural History of Medieval Europe. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

425. Historiography. 

Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: History major. 

431. Social and Cultural History of the IT. S. since 1865. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of history. 

440. The Evolution of European Nationalism since 1789. 
Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the development of modern nationalism among the 
British, French, German, Italian, and Russian peoples. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

451. Social and Cultural History of the United States, 1787 to 
1865. 
Three hours a week. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of History. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Miss Holtzcxaw, Mrs. Bloxton, Miss Chapman, Miss Lacy, Miss 
Sellman, Miss Simmons, ani> Mrs. Watters 

The Home Economics Department is recognized hy and re- 
ceives assistance from the Federal Government as a center for the 
training of vocational teachers of Home Economics. 



Courses of Instruction 119 

Clothing and Textiles 

7. Problems of College Freshmen. 
Fall quarter. Three hours a week. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Open to all students. 

This is a brief survey course the aim of which is to help 
freshmen adjust themselves to college life, and to see home 
economics in the broad aspect of personal living. 
Topics discussed are: time management, personal financing, 
food selection and health habits, etiquette, personal improve- 
ment in grooming, dress selection, care of clothing and the 
college room as a part of the student's surroundings. 

8. The Clothing Problem of the Individual. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 

A continuation of Home Economics 7 with emphasis upon 

textile study, the buying of fabrics from the consumer's 

standpoint, and the construction of clothing to meet individual 

needs. 

Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

117. The Family Clothing Problem. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. Credit 
three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
The wardrobe needs of the various members of the family are 
studied. Planning and constructing garments for members of a 
family group, and repairing, renovating, and caring for cloth- 
ing in the home are considered. 
Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

215. Costume Design. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course makes application of the principles of design to 
dress. A study of national and historic costumes forms the 
basis for designing modern garments. 

227. Applied Costume Design. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 



120 East Carolina Teachers College 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
With the foundation pattern as a basis the garments designed 
in Home Economics 215 are executed. 
Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

Foods and Nutrition 

2. Elementary Foods. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course deals with the composition, selection, and prepara- 
tion of everyday foods. All preparation of food is done on a 
meal basis in unit kitchens. Students are given opportunity to 
use electricity, gas, and kerosene as fuels. 
Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

110. Foods. 

One lecture period and four laboratory hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course includes the selection of food as to quality, nutri- 
tive value, and cost; the preparation and serving of meals for 
different occasions. 
Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

205. What Shall We Eat? 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to juniors and seniors who are not home economics stu- 
dents. 

A non-technical course planned to assist students in selecting 
their own meals. 

220. School Lunchroom Management. 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to develop an appreciation for and 
knowledge of child feeding as it functions in the school cafe- 
teria, and to gain skill in the operation of a school cafeteria. 
Practical experience is gained through participation in the 
activities of the Training School Lunchroom. 

224. Survey of Cookery. 

Fall quarter. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quar- 
ter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course consists of the preparation of various types of food, 



Courses of Instruction 121 

the testing of standard recipes and their variations. A short 
unit of food preservation is also given in this course. 
Laboratory Fee, $2.00. 

225. Nutrition. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 

The essentials of an adequate diet, the food needs for different 

ages and occupations, and the nutritive value of food materials. 

325. Nutrition. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Elective for home economics and science majors. 

This course is a continuation of Home Economics 225. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint students with the work 

that is now being done in the field of nutrition, and to make 

practical application of this information. 

The Home 

100. Social Usage. 

Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
This course deals with good usage in social affairs. 

104. Home Nursing and Health of the Family. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the hygienic measures recommended for the home 
and community; simple methods for home care of the sick 
and the convalescent. 

126. House Furnishing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course is planned to establish standards for the selection 
of furnishings according to artistic and scientific principles. 

127. Housing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
The study of modern housing from the social, economic and 
artistic standpoints. Standards for housing and their relation 
to desirable home life are considered. 



122 East Carolina Teachers College 

216. The Home Vegetable Garden. 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Credit: two 

quarter hours. 

Practical work in the home vegetable garden is given. 

217. Landscaping the Home Grounds. 

One lecture and one laboratory period a week. Credit: two 

quarter hours. 

Practical work in landscaping is given. 

218. The Home Flower Garden. 

One lecture and two laboratory periods a week. Credit: two 

quarter hours. 

Practical work in the home flower garden is given. 

226. Consumer Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Purchasing problems arising in the home in the present eco- 
nomic structure are studied. Legislation in branding, labelling, 
standardization of merchandise, and simple household tests of 
commodities are considered. 

230. Child Development. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
This course considers the care of the mother before the birth of 
a child as well as the care of an infant during and after birth. 
A study is also made of the food, clothing, and nursery needs of 
the child. Good physical, mental, social, and emotional develop- 
ment as it is affected by home environment is considered. 
Observation is made of the development of children in the 
nursery school. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103 and Science 113. 

231. Practicum in Child Development. 

Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of home economics majors. 

Observation and participation in the nursery school with a 
study of methods used in training young children, teaching 
materials and practices used in the nursery school. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 230. 

319. Home Management House. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Unit I. A group of not more than six seniors live in a modern 



Courses of Instruction 123 

house, under the supervision of an instructor, for a period of 

six weeks. This course aims to develop ideals and standards of 

good living. 

Unit II. A group of three seniors live in an apartment, simply 

furnished, on a lower income level than Unit I. 

Units I and II are housed in the same building and are run 

simultaneously. Opportunity is given for each student to have 

experiences in both units. 

Prerequisites: Home Economics 224, 225 and 326. 

326. Household Management. 

Two lecture periods and two laboratory hours a week. Credit 

three quarter hours. 

Required of all students who major in home economics. 

This course is prerequisite to the Home Management House and 

is intended to supplement the work done there. Some provision 

is made for the care of the sick in the home. Such topics as 

budgeting of time and money, labor saving equipment, factors 

that constitute household managerial ability and how these are 

maintained under different social and economic situations are 

stressed. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics Education 

222. Leaders in the Field of Home Economics. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

A study of the leaders and the developments in the Home 

Economics movement. 

223. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
An application of the fundamentals of education to home eco- 
nomics instruction. The selection of problems, their presenta- 
tion, and the use of objective material is considered. 

228. The Teaching of Foods in Secondary Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course aims to give students simple and fundamental 
principles of cookery and nutrition that can be applied in 
the teaching of foods in High Schools throughout the state. 
Open to juniors and seniors. 



124 East Carolina Teachers College 

232. a, b, c. Apprenticeship in Home Economics. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to home economics juniors and seniors. 

323. Methods of Teaching Home Economics. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course parallels the practice teaching in home economics, 
and deals with special problems of the teachers while they 
carry on their work. It places emphasis upon the techniques of 
home visiting and upon the organization of the home project. 
Open to senior students only. 

324. Observation and Practice in Teaching Home Economics. 
Every quarter. Nine hours a week for twelve weeks. Credit: 
six quarter hours. 

Required of all candidates who major in home economics. 
Observation and participation in the vocational home eco- 
nomics program of the Greenville schools. 

327. Home Management Supervision. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed for those who are interested in going into 
such types of home economics work as the Farm Security 
Administration and Home Demonstration work. Emphasis will 
be put upon the analysis of family needs and the working out 
of low budgets for the farm family. Field work will be done 
under the direction of those experienced in this type of 
home economics activity. 
Prerequisite: Sociology 101. 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS 

Mb. MoHenrt 

11. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to students in any department. 

The use and care of drawing instruments, perspective and 
isometric drawing, orthographic projections including section- 
ing and revolutions, lettering. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

12. Elementary Mechanical Drawing. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A continuation of 11. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



Coukses of Instruction 125 

21. Bench Work. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to students in any department. 

A beginner's course in bench woodwork. Use and care of com- 
mon woodworking tools, common woods, and common finishes. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

22. General Woodworking. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

An advanced course in general woodworking with emphasis on 

technique and technical application of principles presented in 

21. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

111. Advanced Mechanical Drawing. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Intersections; stretchouts; cabinet drawing. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 12. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

112. Machine Drawing. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Machine parts including cams, gears, screws. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 111. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

122. Machine Woodwork and Cabinet Construction. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Advanced project construction and drill in tool processes. 

The use, care, adjustments, and operation of woodworking 

machines in cabinet construction. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

140. Industrial Arts Education. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

The introduction to industrial arts education. Lectures, re- 
search, and visitations. 

211. Architectural Drawing. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



126 East Carolina Teachers College 

This course deals with the design and construction of small 

houses. The student will develop a complete set of plans, write 

specifications, and estimate the cost of a house. Visits will be 

made to houses under construction to study the design and 

building methods. 

Prerequisite: Industrial Arts 112. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

231. General Shop. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course is designed to stimulate correlation between shop 
activities and academic subjects. It plans to enlighten students 
who are preparing to teach academic subjects in methods of con- 
struction pertinent to their particular subject. Opportunity will 
be offered to work in wood, metal, concrete, leather, textiles, etc. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

245. Industrial Arts for Elementary Teachers. 

Offered every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

This is a practical course in the use of tools and materials. Its 
purpose is the understanding of a valuable medium for the 
child's creative expression. All procedures are closely allied 
with the activities of the elementary school and are intended 
to develop a classroom method. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

255. Construction and Repair of Equipment and Supplies for 
Physical Education. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned to give the necessary training in plan- 
ning, construction, and maintenance of physical education 
equipment and supplies, and of playground equipment. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

260. House Planning and Household Mechanics. 

"Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A technichal course dealing with the problems involved in the 

design, construction, and repair of houses. Includes a study of 

common building materials, repair of equipment, heating and 

ventilation, plumbing, lighting, and household safety. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



Courses of Instruction 127 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Mr. Snider and Mr. Hardaway 

210. School Libraries. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a survey course of the importance and function of 
the school library in modern education including the organi- 
zation and administration of such libraries. It is intended 
for the administrator, teacher and teacher-librarian. 

211. School Libraries. 

One recitation and eight hours of library work a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

A continuation of Library Science 210. 

Prerequisite: Library Science 210. 

212. Classification and Cataloging. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of classification and cataloging, ordering printed cards, 
assigning subject headings, making and arranging card catalog 
for a school library. 

214. Bibliography and Reference. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of national and trade bibliography, and the use of the 

more important reference tools in a school library. 

220. Book Selection. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course in the selection and evaluation of books for the school 
library, use of the various aids, and the examination and read- 
ing of books for young people with especial emphasis on the 
requirements of the North Carolina course of study. 

222. Book Selection. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A continuation of Library Science 220. 
Prerequisite: Library Science 220. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. ReBarker, Miss Ghaham, Miss Williams, and Miss England 

42. Arithmetic for Elementary Majors. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. The course 



128 East Carolina Teachers College 

deals with the following topics: reading and writing of num- 
bers, fundamental processes with integers and fractions, aliquot 
parts, bills and accounts, ratio and proportion, denominate 
numbers, formulas, graphs, drawing to scale, and problem 
solving. 

57-58. Plane Trigonometry. 

Fall and Winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

The course includes the derivation and use of formulas, solu- 
tion of the right triangle with the natural and logarithmic func- 
tions, solution of oblique triangles, functions of any angle, 
functions of two or more angles, inverse functions, and prac- 
tical applications. 

59. Solid Geometry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

The course is comprised of the fundamental theorems, mensura- 
tion of surfaces and solids, and original exercises. 

60-110. College Algebra. 

Spring and Fall quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

A rapid review of high school algebra is given; also a study 
of systems of quadratic equations, functions, graphs, complex 
numbers, progressions, permutations, and combinations, prob- 
ability, theory of equations, binomial theorem, mathematical 
induction, and determinants. 

121-122. Plane Analytic Geometry. 

Winter and Spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 57, 58, 59, 60, and 110. 
A study of rectangular coordinates, loci, the straight line, the 
circle, polar coordinates, conic sections, transformation of 
coordinates, higher plane curves, and an introduction to co- 
ordinate geometry in space. 

136. Arithmetic for Elementary Majors. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



Courses of Instruction 129 

Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42. 

The course is devoted to the study of percentage and its 

applications. 

154. Arithmetic for High School Majors. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of high school majors. 

The course aims primarily to develop accuracy and facility in 

the integral and fractional processes, and the ability to apply 

these processes to percentage and its application, mensuration, 

denominate numbers, ratio and proportion, business forms, 

and problem solving. 

156. General Mathematics. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of all students except mathematics and home eco- 
nomics majors. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136, or 154. 
The course is designed to give a general knowledge of some 
important phases of mathematics which are frequently used in 
social, industrial, business, and professional life. It includes a 
study of formulas, graphs, timerates, mathematical forms and 
designs, intuitive development of common mathematics prin- 
ciples, common logarithms, slide rule, trigonometry of the right 
triangle, variation, and functions. 

210. Teaching of Grammar-Grade Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of grammar-grade majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136. 

The course consists of a professional treatment of the subject 
matter of arithmetic for the grammar grades. Modern methods 
of teaching grammar-grade arithmetic are presented through 
a study of recent publications on the subject. The course also 
includes observations of the grammar grades in the laboratory 
school. 

212. Teaching of Primary Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Required of primary majors. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136. 

It is the purpose of this course to present the most modern 

methods of teaching primary arithmetic. The course consists 

of a study of the latest publications and courses of study in 

9 



130 East Carolina Teachers College 

primary arithmetic, together with the findings of experimenta- 
tion in the field of primary number work. The course also 
includes frequent observations in the laboratory school. 

213, 214, 215. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. Three hours a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 121 and 122. 

The course is devoted to the following topics : functions, theory 

of limits, differentiation, differentials, application of derivatives 

and differentials, integration, and the application of integrals. 

223. Teaching of Senior High School Mathematics. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

A study of the teaching objectives of senior high school mathe- 
matics, organization of content, general and specific teaching 
techniques, testing, and the observation of teaching. 

232-233. College Geometry. 

Fall and Winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours each. 
Required of mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 121 and 122. 

The course includes a study of geometric construction, similar 
and homothetic figures; properties of the triangle including the 
circum-circle, medians, bisectors, and altitudes; transversals, 
harmonic properties of circles, and inversion. Many miscel- 
laneous theorems and exercises are presented for solution. 

245. Teaching Apprenticeship. 

Each quarter. Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with 
class routine, general and specific teaching techniques in sec- 
ondary mathematics, and principles of teaching through di- 
rected observation, preparation of materials, and participation. 
A high school class in mathematics will serve as a laboratory 
for the course. 

272. Field Work in Mathematics. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 57 and 58, or 156. 

The purpose of the course is to teach the significance and the 



Courses of Instruction 131 

use of the slide rule, plane table, level, sextant, and the transit 
•through participation in activities involving the utilization of 
these instruments. 

318. History of Elementary Mathematics. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Required of mathematics majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 
The course is designed to give a general view of the develop- 
ment of the elementary branches of mathematics: arithmetic, 
algebra, synthetic and analytic geometry, trigonometry, and 
calculus. 

323. Teaching of Junior High School Mathematics. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of mathematics majors. 

The teaching objectives of junior high school mathematics, 
organization of subject matter, analysis of textbooks and 
courses of study in junior high school mathematics, general 
and specific teaching techniques in junior high school mathe- 
matics, and the observation of teaching. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of mathematics majors. 

325. History of Arithmetic. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of primary and grammar-grade majors. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 42 and 136, or 154. 
A study of the history of the development of arithmetic as a 
science and as a school subject, with special emphasis on 
methods and devices through the application of which the 
science of numbers has reached its present stage of develop- 
ment. 

400. Seminar. 

Three quarters. Two hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of students writing theses in the field of the teaching 
of mathematics. 

425-426. Theory of Equations. 

Fall and "Winter quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours each. 



132 East Carolina Teachers College 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

A study of complex numbers, roots, geometric construction, 

cubic and quartic equations, graphs, isolation of real roots, 

solution of numerical equations, determinants, and symmetric 

functions. 

432. Differential Equations. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 
A study of ordinary differential equations of the first and second 
orders, and their application to elementary mechanics, with 
emphasis on geometric interpretation and application. 

442. Advanced Calculus. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

A study of the definite integral as a sum and its applications, 

partial derivatives, development in series, and multiple 

integrals. 

443. Solid Analytic Geometry. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 213, 214, and 215. 

A study of coordinate geometry in space, the point, the line, 

the plane, surfaces of revolution, and quadratic surfaces. 

455. Eeadings and Research in the Teaching of Arithmetic. 
Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the field of literature relating to the field of the 
teaching of arithmetic, with special emphasis on educational 
research in the teaching of arithmetic. 

456. Readings and Research in the Teaching of Secondary 

Mathematics. 
Winter Quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study of educational literature relating to the field of the 
teaching of secondary mathematics with special emphasis on 
research in this field. 

462. Problems in Mathematics Education. 

"Winter Qaurter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 



Courses of Instruction 133 

A laboratory course designed for the study of problems in the 
field of mathematics education relative to specific schools or 
school systems in which the student is employed or otherwise 
vitally interested. 

MUSIC EDUCATION 

Mr. Dittmeb, Miss Gorrhll, Miss Kuykendat.t,, Miss E^som, 
Me. Rossell and Mr. Getchkll 

The purpose of the Department of Music Education is three- 
fold: 

1. To meet the needs for competent Vocal and Instrumental 
Teachers of Music in the State of North Carolina and its sur- 
rounding territory. This need will be met by presenting, to 
students with a native musical talent, a complete and well 
rounded curriculum in Music Education. 

2. To meet the music needs of students majoring in the fields of 
Elementary Education. 

3. To meet the musical needs of all students who desire to broaden 
their cultural background through the arts. 

10. Theory. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Aim: To provide the student with a thorough understanding of 

music fundamentals. 

Topics: Essentials of music notation; solfeggio; sight-singing 

and ear-training through the use of rote songs to be used in the 

public schools, simple dictation and harmonization. 

Not open to music majors. 

10 M. Theory. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of music notation, sight-singing and ear training. 
Open to music majors only. 

11. Theory. 

Winter Quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Prerequisite: Music 10 M. 

13. Theory. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

This course is a suggested elective for all Music Majors. 

Prerequisites: Music 10 and 11. 



134 East Carolina Teachers College 

106. Acquaintance with the Literature of Music. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
A survey of the musical literature from the various historical 
periods in music; a study of outstanding composers and 
examples of their compositions; development of vocal and in- 
strumental forms; listening lesson through programs by radio, 
piano, phonograph and local concerts; creative music; original 
melodies and dances; song interpretation. 
Open to music majors only. 

107. History of Musical Development. 

Winter quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
A study of the characteristics of the various historical periods 
in music. Development of Song form; Sonata Symphony; 
chamber Music; Opera; Modern Music tendencies. Music in its 
relation to peoples of the earth. Folk Songs and Dances of the 
various countries with illustrations. 
Prerequisite: Music 106. 
Open to music majors only. 

110. Harmony. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Aim: To provide the music major with a thorough working 
knowledge of harmonic problems. 

Topics: Study of scales, intervals, construction of triads in 
major and minor modes with inversions of the common chords 
and seventh chords — Two, three, and four part writing, modula- 
tion and simple analysis with keyboard practice. 
Prerequisite: Music 11. 

111. Harmony. 

Winter quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Music 110. 

112. Harmony. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit : two quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Music 111. 

113. Orchestration and Composition. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Arranging for orchestra, band, and small instrumental groups. 
Instrument ranges, tone qualities, and best usages in orchestra- 
tion. Principles of composition for choral and instrumental 
groups. 



Courses of Instruction 135 

115. Introduction to Musicology. 

Winter Quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

An introduction to the systematic study of the literature of 

music from the physical, the historical, and the philosophical 

viewpoint. 

Prerequisites: Music 10 M and 11. 

202. Music Education in the Primary Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study and interpretation of rote song repertory; correction 
of monotone tendencies; musical experiences of primary chil- 
dren; child voice and its care; creative music; change from 
rote to note; music in its relation to the primary school cur- 
riculum. Observation in the laboratory school. 
Open to primary majors only. 

202 M. Music Education in the Primary Grades. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study and interpretation of rote song repertory; corection of 
monotone tendencies; musical experiences of primary chil- 
dren; child voice and its care; creative music; change from 
rote to note; music in its relation to the primary school cur- 
riculum. Observation in the laboratory school. 
Open to music majors only. 

203. Music Education in the Grammar Grades. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. Credited as Education. 

A study and selection of musical literature for grammar grades : 

Folk songs, two and three part songs, orchestral instruments, 

program selection, radio and concert; child voice; changing 

boy voice — introduction of Bass Clef — music in its relation to 

the Grammar-Grade curriculum. Observation in the laboratory 

school. 

Open to grammar majors only. 

203 M. Music Education in the Grammar Grades. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. Credited as Education. 

A study and selection of musical literature for grammar 
grades: folk songs, two and three part songs, orchestral in- 
struments, program selection, radio and concert; child voice; 



136 East Carolina Teachers College 

changing boy voice — introduction of Bass Clef — music in its 
relation to the Grammar-Grade curriculum. Observation in the 
laboratory school. 
Open to music majors only. 

205. Conducting. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
Study of the fundamentals of choral and orchestral conducting. 
The techniques of the baton; theory and practical experiences 
with college organizations will be provided. Required of all 
music majors. 

208. Musical Tests. 

Winter quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
A study of the various batteries of music tests available; with 
practical experience in presentation, analysis, and implications. 
Prerequisites: Music Ed. 10, 11, 110, 111, 112. 

209. Materials and Application in Instrumental Group In- 

struction. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
A course offering practical application of materials for instru- 
mental group instruction; beginning bands, orchestras, and 
smaller instrumental combinations. 
Prerequisites: Music Ed. 10, 11, 110, 111, 112, 205, Group 121 

a, b, a 

210. Harmony. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
A study of advanced harmony including modulation, chromatic 
alterations, ornamental tones and advanced analysis. 
Prerequisite: Music 112. 

211. Music and Its Kelation to the Elementary School Child. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A study of the musical experiences of elementary school chil- 
dren and the materials available; rote song repertory; sight 
singing; unison, two and three part song; child voice and its 
potentialities; correction of monotone tendencies; music liter- 
ature for the elementary child; Music in its relation to the 
Elementary school. Observation in the laboratory school. 
Required and open only to combination music and primary or 
grammar majors, 



Courses of Instruction 137 

212. Creative Music. 

Spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

A practical course in instrumental construction. Presented 
jointly by the Industrial Arts and Music Education Depart- 
ments. Projects in instrumental construction for the public 
schools are presented by the students. 
Elective for all students. 
Credited as Industrial Arts 231. 

223. Music Education in the Junior and Senior High School. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Open to music majors only. 

Topics: Theoretical courses for high schools: theory, harmony, 
history, and appreciation; music clubs as extra-curricular ac- 
tivities; chapel programs and assembly singing; applied music 
in the high school; orchestra (seating, rehearsals, programs) ; 
band (seating, rehearsals, programs) ; choruses (seating, re- 
hearsals, programs) ; piano and instrumental group instruc- 
tion in the high school. 

306. Musical Literature and Its Historical Development. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

A course designed for students desiring a general knowledge 

of musical literature. A study of musical literature, ancient and 

modern, in its relation to man; acquaintance with outstanding 

composers and their compositions; survey of available radio 

and community programs ; attendance at all available concerts 

is required. 

Not open to music majors. 

324. Observation and Supervised Teaching. 

Every quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Two quarters of practice teaching are required of all music 
majors. The student may elect to do both quarters in the ele- 
mentary school or one quarter in elementary school and one 
in the high school. Combination majors with music as a second 
high school major will be required to do one quarter of practice 
teaching in music and one quarter in the other major field. 
This course is credited as Education 324Mu. 



138 East Carolina Teachers College 

APPLIED MUSIC: INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION 

Major Choice 
Piano, Voice, or Orchestra Instrument 

Courses in Applied Music are open to all College Students. 
Entrance to advanced courses by examination and consent of the 
instructor. 

All individual instruction carries with it a fee of $7.00 a 
quarter for two half-hour lessons a week. 

"A piano practice fee of $1.00 a quarter for one hour practice 
a day will be charged students desiring the use of college pianos." 

"Students using other college instruments will be charged an 
instrumental fee of $1.00 a quarter." 

30. Piano. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 
one quarter hour each. 

Hand position; fundamental touches; general posture; scale 
and arpeggio work; development of technic throughout the 
course ; stressing of time and rhythm ; studies and pieces suited 
to the individual student. 

40. Voice. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 
one quarter hour each. 

The course presents the fundamentals of voice production: 
posture breathing, tone production, vowel and consonant place- 
ment. 

50. Violin. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 
one quarter hour each. 

A study of violin repertoire and technique with special emphasis 
on tone production, intonation, and proper posture. 

51. Cello. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 
one quarter hour each. 

A study of cello repertoire and technique with special emphasis 
on tone production, intonation, and proper posture. 



Courses of Instruction 139 

53. Trumpet. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 

one quarter hour each. 

A study of tone production and playing technique. 

54. Trombone. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 

one quarter hour each. 

A study of slide positions, technique and good tone production. 

5*5. Horn. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 
one quarter hour each. 

A study of tone production, technique, and intonation of the 
French or Alto horn. 

56. Clarinet. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 

one quarter hour each. 

A study of tone production and playing technique. 

57. Saxophone. 

Fall, Winter, and Spring quarters. One hour a week. Credit: 

one quarter hour each. 

A student may select any of the saxophone family. 

A study of the tone production and playing technique. 

Applied Music — Group Instruction 

100 A. Piano Group. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
An orientation course in piano technique, leading, through 
simple selections, toward the mastery of simple accompani- 
ments. 

100B. Piano Group. 

Winter quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Group 100A. 

100C. Piano Group. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Group 100A, 100B. 

101A. Voice Group. 

Fall quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
An orientation course in vocal technique leading to a mastery 



140 East Carolina Teachers College 

of the fundamental principles of good voice production. 
Topics: stage presence; breath control; vowel formation; 
consonant formation; tone production; resonance; the head 
voice; interpretations. 

101B. Voice Group. 

Winter quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Group 101A. 

101 C. Voice Group. 

Spring quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Group 101A, 101B. 

121A. Brass Group Instruction. 

Fall Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A practical course in learning the technique of tone production 
and pitch variation of the brass instruments. Student will have 
an opportunity to play together in ensemble formation simple 
exercises and harmonies. 

121B. Brass Group Instruction. 

Winter Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 121 A. 

121C. Brass Group Instruction. 

Spring Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 121B. 

122 A. Wood "Wind Group Instruction. 

Fall Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A practical course in learning the technique of tone production 
and pitch variation on the wood wind instruments. Students will 
have opportunity to play together in ensemble formation simple 
exercises and harmonies. 

122B. Wood Wind Group Instruction. 

Winter Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 122A. 

122C. Wood Wind Group Instruction. 

Spring Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 122B. 

123A. String Group Instruction. 

Fall Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A practical course in learning proper position and technique of 



Courses of Instruction 141 

tone production and pitch variation on violin, viola, cello, and 
bass. Students will learn various studies and selections in 
ensemble. 

123B. String Group Instruction. 

Winter Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 123A. 

123 C. String Group Instruction. 

Spring Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 123B. 

200A. Piano Group Instruction. 

Fall Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
An advanced course in piano group instruction. 
Prerequisites: Music 100A,-B,-'C or equivalent. 

200B. Piano Group Instruction. 

Winter Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 200A. 

200C. Piano Group Instruction. 

Spring Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 200B. 

201A. Voice Group Instruction. 

Fall Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
An advanced course in vocal group instruction. 
Prerequisites: Music 101A,-B,-C, or equivalent. 

201B. Voice Group Instruction. 

Winter Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 201A. 

201C. Voice Group Instruction. 

Spring Quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Prerequisite: Music 201B. 

Musical Organizations 

272. "Women's Chorus. 

Every quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

A study and production of standard choral work for female 

voices. 

Prerequisite: an acceptable singing voice. 

Laboratory fee, $.50. 



142 East Carolina Teachers College 

274. College Choir. 

Every quarter. Two hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

A study and production of standard choral works for mixed 

voices. 

Prerequisite: an acceptable singing voice. 

Laboratory fee, $.50. 

281. College Band. 

Every quarter. One rehearsal a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

A study and production of standard works for band. 

Prerequisite: the ability to play a band instrument. 

Laboratory fee, $.50. 

282. College Orchestra. 

Every quarter. One rehearsal a week. Credit: one quarter 

hour. 

A study and production of classical orchestral compositions. 

Prerequisite: the ability to play an orchestra instrument. 

Laboratory fee, $.50. 

*380. Instrumental Ensemble. 

Every quarter. Rehearsal hours arranged. Credit: two quarter 
hours. 

A study and production of compositions for various instru- 
mental combinations. 

Prerequisite: the ability to read and play advanced instru- 
mental compositions. 
Laboratory fee, $.50. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Dr. Brooks, Dr. Aycook, Mr. Hankner, Mr. Christenbtjry, 
Miss Parks, Miss Grogan, Miss Robertson 

Courses are offered under the supervision of this department 
to meet the needs of certification in all fields of public school 
teaching and to prepare students who wish to become teachers of 
Health or of Physical Education. The department also offers an 
opportunity to all students to learn how to maintain themselves 
in physical well being and health. The departments of Science 
and Home Economics cooperate in supplying the basic courses 
in anatomy, physiology, nutrition and chemistry. 

* A fee of $1.00 per quarter will be charged for all instruments furnished by 
the College. 



Courses of Instruction 143 

HEALTH 

1. Personal Hygiene (formerly science 100). 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The study of hygiene as a means of improving and conserving 
health and efficiency. 

Lectures and class discussions on the relation of diet exercise, 
sleep, bathing, clothing, etc., to our daily lives. 

2. Health Principles and Practices (formerly P. E. 119). 
Winter Quarter. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A discussion of the principles and practices of individual health 
is given. 

Open to all students. 

3. Individual Health Problems (formerly P. E. 120). 
Spring term. One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This is a study of individual health problems as they affect the 
individual's efficiency. 

Open to all students. 

105. School and Community Hygiene (formerly science 105). 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a study of hygiene as applied to school and community 
activities. This includes the care of the -buildings and grounds, 
water supply, control of epidemics, proper heating and ventila- 
tion of buildings, and inspection of foods. 

225. Safety Education and First Aid. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Methods of caring for injuries and applying first aid to the 

injured, together with methods of preventing injuries and 

accidents form the basis of this course. 

Demonstrated by the students. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

240. Principles of Health and Physical Education for Ele- 
mentary Schools. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with a study of the bases for health education 
and physical education in modern society and a consideration 
of the physiological, psychological and sociological principles 
to be followed in order to make an intelligent selection and use 
of health and physical education activities in the elementary 
school. 



144 East Carolina Teachers College 

244. Practices and Procedures in Health for Elementary Schools. 
Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the current practices in health educa- 
tion for elementary schools, and gives a survey of the mate- 
rials available for teaching health to children of the elementary 
school level. 

317. Principles of Health and Physical Education. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with a study of the bases for health educa- 
tion and physical education in modern society and a considera- 
tion of the physiological, psychological and sociological prin- 
ciples to be followed in order to make an intelligent selection 
and use of health and physical education activities in the 
secondary school. 

Open only to majors in physical education. 
Prerequisites: Physical Education 17 and Science 106, 107 and 
113. 

360. Child Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: Three quarter hours. 
This is a study of the child from infancy through the succeed- 
ing periods of growth and development. Special emphasis is 
given to the pre-school child and early adjustments of the 
school child. 
Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

365. School and Community Health Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This is a study of the activities involved in maintaining and 

improving school and community health. Special emphasis is 

placed on milk supply, communicable diseases, food inspection, 

water supply and sewage disposal. Students make field trips to 

observe various public health activities. 

Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

370. Methods and Materials in Health Education. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is a study of some practical principles of health educa- 
tion designed for application in elementary and secondary 
schools. Special reference is made to sources of material avail- 
able to health instruction. 

Emphasis is placed on the planning of well integrated units 
for personal and community health study. 
Open to seniors and graduate students only. 



Courses of Insteuction 145 

399. Nurses' Aide Training. 

One lecture and four hours a week. Practical laboratory work 
in the college infirmary, the local hospital, or with county 
nurses. Admission to the class only by permission of the 
teacher. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The aim of Physical Education in the College is two-fold: 
first, to bring about normal growth and development, the con- 
servation of health, and the neuro-muscular control required for 
prompt and accurate response; second, to inspire the student 
teachers to work toward maximum physical and mental fitness of 
the children of North Carolina. 

In short, if Physical Education may insure physical efficiency, 
mental sanity, and a healthful and intelligent interest in a life- 
long practice of all forms of activities which stimulate them, it 
has fulfilled its purpose. 

Where physical disability makes it advisable not to participate 
in the regularly organized class activities, work in a corrective 
class, depending on the needs of the student, is prescribed. No 
one is excused from this requirement. 

A gymnasium uniform is required of every girl taking Physical 
Education. This may be bought at the Stationery Room after 
entering college. 

1. Introduction to Physical Education. 

Three hours a week each quarter. Credit: 2 quarter hours. 
The object of this course is to familiarize the student with 
the health, recreational and educational potentialities of Physi- 
cal Education as it applies to present-day educational practices. 
Open to all students. 

2. Activities for the Primary Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

This course includes the study of rhythms, singing games, and 

simple little dances that are adapted for use in the primary 

grades. 

. 3. Activities for the Grammar Grades. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

This course includes activities to be taught in the grammar 

10 



146 East Carolina Teachers College 

grades. Schoolroom and outdoor games and a few folk dances 
are given. 

13. Fieldball, Speedball, and Soccer. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course deals with the fundamental techniques of fieldball, 
speedball, and soccer as team games. Emphasis is placed upon a 
mastery of the fundamentals. 

14. Elementary Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course deals with the fundamental techniques of basket- 
ball. 
Emphasis is placed upon a mastery of the fundamentals. 

15. Softball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

This course covers softball fundamentals, team play and 

officiating. 

17. Introduction to Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the 
health, recreational, and educational potentialities of Physical 
'Education as it applies to present-day educational practices. 
Open only to majors in Physical Education. 

21. Fundamentals of Tennis. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The object of this course is to familiarize the student with the 

fundamentals and elementary principles underlying tennis as 

a recreational and competitive game. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

22. Fencing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is to familiarize the student with the fundamentals 
of fencing and the use and care of fencing equipment. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

23. Large Group Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Calisthenics, marching, and mass games are presented which 
will provide the student with teaching material and methods of 
organizing and conducting large groups. Activities requiring 
limited equipment will be stressed. 



Courses of Instruction 147 

24. Elementary Field Hockey. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Fundamentals of field hockey are stressed and a playing knowl- 
edge of the game taught together with the elementary coaching 
points. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

25. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is open to those students who are restricted in their 
activities and where instruction in a program of activities 
adapted to their particular needs is indicated. The course is 
designed especially for underweight, overweight, posture, heart, 
foot, kidney, post-operative, and paralysis cases. 

26. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 25. 

27. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 26. 

28. Elementary Football. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the individual with 

the fundamental essentials of football. 

31. Boxing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The aim of this course is to familiarize the student with the 

fundamentals of boxing. 

32. "Wrestling. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The simpler holds used in intercollegiate and interscholastic 
wrestling are taught. Ring strategy and conditioning drills 
form a part of the required work. 

41. Tumbling and Self -Testing Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with 
those activities that can be performed individually, or in 
groups, and in such a manner that the students can organize 
and measure progress without the use of elaborate equipment 
or direction. 



148 East Carolina Teachers College 

104. Archery. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the 

techniques of archery, clout and target shooting, the care and 

repair of equipment is stressed. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

105. Recreational Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with various 
games of popular recreational nature, such as, croquet, bad- 
minton, aerial darts, shumeboard, quoits, deck tennis, paddle 
tennis, tetherball, box hockey, volley ball, horseshoes, and table 
tennis. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

107. Clog and Character Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit : one quarter hour. 

The fundamental steps and simpler routines of clog, tap, and 

character dancing form the basis of this course. 

110. Social Recreation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
Games suited to party, group, and community organizations are 
stressed in this course. Games possessed of maximum entertain- 
ment possibilities and requiring little or no equipment are 
stressed. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

111. Social Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 

An introduction to the elementary steps and technique of 

social dancing. 

112. Folk Dancing. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is planned to acquaint the student with the funda- 
mental skills of folk and national dances. 

114. The Coaching of Baseball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The mastery of the essential techniques and coaching pro- 
cedures of baseball. Field drills and a study of modern methods 
of teaching game skills form the basis of this course. Motion 



Courses of Instruction 149 

pictures are used as supplementary materials. Officiating in 
intramural games is required. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

121. Advanced Tennis. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A course stressing the playing techniques and skills such as are 
required of advanced players. A playing knowledge and fair 
degree of skill are prerequisites to this course. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

127. Playground and Community Recreation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The management and conduct of school and community play- 
grounds and the problems involved in such administration 
form the basis of this course. Large school and community 
playgrounds are visited and their work observed. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

134. Club Leadership. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The organization and conduct of Boy Scout, Girl Scout, Camp 

Fire Girls, and Four-H Club Work. 

Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

135. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 27. 

136. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 135. 

137. Adapted Activities. 

Three hours a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
A continuation of Ph. Ed. 136. 

210. The Coaching of Track and Field Athletics. 
Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The coaching fundamentals, individual techniques, and con- 
ditioning activities pertaining to the teaching and coaching of 
interseholastic track and field athletics are the major aims of 
this course. Motion pictures are used as supplementary mate- 
rial for the course. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 



150 East Carolina Teachers College 

211. The Coaching of Football. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The coaching fundamentals, individual techniques, and con- 
ditioning activities pertaining to the teaching and coaching of 
high school football are the major aims of this course. Motion 
pictures are used as supplementary material for the course. 
Officiating in intramural games is required. 
Prerequisite: Physical Education 28. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

212. The Coaching of Girls' Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
The aim of this course is to present the fundamental coaching 
and teaching procedures of girls' basketball. Mastery of game 
techniques is required. All students are required to officiate in 
games and aid in carrying on of intramural basketball activi- 
ties. Motion pictures are used as supplementary material for 
the course. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 14. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

213. The Coaching of Boys' Basketball. 

Three hours a week. Credit: two quarter hours. 
This course aims to present the fundamental coaching and 
teaching procedures of boys' basketball. Mastery of game tech- 
niques is required. Motion pictures are used as supplementary 
material for the course. Officiating in intramural game3 is 
required. 

Prerequisite: Physical Education 14. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

223. Methods of Teaching Health and Physical Education 
(Ed. 223 P. E.). 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Methods of teaching Health and Physical Education in the 
public schools. The State and proposed National objectives, 
aims, and requirements are brought before the students. The 
handling of public school groups under varying conditions 
is stressed. 

228. Play and Recreation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the theory and organization of play and recreation. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



Courses of Instruction 151 

245. Practices and Procedures in Physical Education for Ele- 
mentary Schools. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is designed to familiarize the student with the 
practices and procedures used in the teaching of physical edu- 
cation in the elementary school. 

301. Tests and Measurements in Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A thorough study and an analysis of the various techniques 

and procedures as used in physical education for diagnostic, 

promotion, and rating purposes. 

Open to graduate students. 

302. The Organization, Administration and Supervision of 

Health and Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the problems of organization and administration of 
health and physical education on the various school levels. 
Teacher load, program planning, grading, and promotion are 
discussed. The duties of the supervisor and his relationship to 
the various administrative groups are studied. 

306. The Theory of Remedial Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A thorough study of the various common remedial defects with 

suggestions for their correction. 

307. The History of Physical Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the historical development and growth of the 
physical education movement from 1800 to present. The differ- 
ent phases of the physical education movement are studied in 
relation to their part in general educational trends. 
Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

324. Observation and Practice Teaching. 

Nine hours a week. Credit: Six quarter hours. 
Observation and practice teaching in Health Education, Phy- 
sical Education, and Recreation. 
Credited as Education 324PE. 



152 East Carolina Teachers College 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Adams, Miss Charlton, Mr. Haynes, Mr. Henderson 
Miss Newell, and Mr. MoGinnis 

103. General Psychology. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students taking four-year courses. 
Aim: To provide for the student a course in the general prin- 
ciples of psychology. 

Topics: The nervous system; sense organs; organs of response; 
inherited modes of behavior, such as reflexes, instincts, emo- 
tions, feelings, sensation, attention, intelligence; individual 
differences. 

201. Psychology of Childhood. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 

hours. 

Required of all primary and grammar grade majors. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

The object of this course is the observation of and the reading 

about children at different age-levels in order that the child 

may be studied as a living, growing organism like, yet different, 

from other individuals. Emphasis throughout the course will 

be placed on mental hygiene and its place in the development 

of a well-integrated personality. 

204. Educational Tests and Measurements. 

Every quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

Required of all students preparing to be grammar-grade 
teachers. 

Aim: To acquaint the student with educational tests and the 
uses of these tests. 

Topics: Titles, publisher, structure, giving, scoring, tabulating 
results, interpreting results; and test uses in grading, classify- 
ing, and promoting students. 

205. Educational Psychology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Prerequisites: General psychology and at least sophomore 

standing. 

Topics: How to study; intelligence, intelligence testing, and the 

uses of intelligence test scores; educational tests; the general 

principles of learning; optimal conditions for learning; the 



Courses of Instruction 153 

learning curve; class experiments in learning processes; trans- 
fer of learning; the biological antecedents of learning; mental 
hygiene; and conditions and causes of maladjustment. 

270. Mental Hygiene in the School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is planned as a part of the professional training of 
the teacher in the elementary and high schools. Two funda- 
mental considerations are treated. First, the mental and social 
problems of the teacher. Second, mental hygiene training for 
children as a function of the school. 

Topics: The meaning and development of the wholesome and 
effective personality for both the teacher and the pupil. Poor 
adjustments in school, disciplinary problems, remedial work, 
and the effect of special educational methods in the light of 
psychological and genetic principles. The relation between the 
school and the home is given correlative though subordinate 
consideration. 

308. Psychology of Elementary School Education. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

Required of Juniors and Seniors working for primary or gram- 
mar certificate. 

A study of the psychological principles underlying the teach- 
ing and learning of the elementary school subjects. Emphasis 
is placed on the modern methods of handling this material as a 
result of more recent investigations and research in the field. 

309. High School Tests. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 

Required of all students preparing to be high school teachers. 

Aim: To acquaint the student with high school tests. 

Topics: Development of test movement, aims of tests, giving 

tests, scoring tests; and the uses of test results in grading, 

classifying, and promoting students. 

312. Psychology of Secondary School Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Aim: To give the student an opportunity to study the psycho- 
logical principles underlying the teaching and learning of the 
high school subject. 

Topics: Certain high school subjects, the choice to suit the 
group taking the course. 



154 East Caeolina Teachees College 

315-316-317-318. Problems in Mental Testing. 

These are one-credit courses. Any quarter on demand for 
individual students. 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and credit in Psychol- 
ogy 103 or its equivalent. Also open to graduate students. 
Unit one: In this unit the student becomes familiar with the 
materials of the Revised Stanford-Binet Scales; learns some- 
thing of the history of its development; becomes acquainted 
with the technique of giving this test; and administers it to at 
least six individuals independent of assistance. 
Unit two: To meet the requirements of this unit the student 
must satisfactorily administer the Binet Intelligence Scale to 
at least ten children and make reports of these testings show- 
ing analyses, and interpretations of results. 
Unit three: In this unit the student is given opportunity to 
administer, evaluate, and interpret the results of group intel- 
ligence tests. 

Unit four: A study of the history of intelligence testing. Other 
units will be offered as demand arises. The satisfactory com- 
pletion of any one unit will get one hour credit. 

340. Psychology of Adolescence. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
This course is intended to make a study of pre-adolescence and 
adolescence. Behavioristic changes that are concomitant with 
the physiological changes of adolescence; their meaning and 
treatment in education training; social institutions designed to 
meet these changes, such as Boy Scouts and Campfire Girls, 
are some of the topics given consideration. 
Open to seniors and graduate students only. 

350. Psychology of Reading in the Elementary School. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
For Seniors working for primary or grammar-grade Class A 
certificate. 

Aim: To give the student an opportunity to study the psycho- 
logical principles underlying the teaching and learning of 
reading. 

Topics: Bringing about a readiness to read; teaching and 
learning how to read; skills essential for reading to learn; 
schoolroom diagnosis of reading difficulties; and remedial 
work on all levels. 



Courses of Instruction 155 

401. Psychology of Childhood. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 103 or its equivalent. 
Aim: To treat such topics as the original nature of the child, 
individual differences, discipline, brightness, dullness, and 
mental, social, and educational adjustment of the child. A study 
of the investigations in this field will be conducted. 

410. Mental Tests and Measurements. 

Any quarter on demand. Three hours a week. Credit: three 
quarter hours. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Aim: To acquaint the student v/ith mental tests and measure- 
ments. 

Topics: Group and individual tests; the technique of giving and 
scoring; interpretation of results; uses in classifying and pro- 
moting children; study of intelligence and its measurements. 

411. Psychology of Learning. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Elective for Seniors. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 103, or its equivalent. 
Aim: To provide for the student a working knowledge of the 
laws of learning and habit formation. 

Topics: Animal learning; human learning; habit formation; 
analysis of the laws of learning. Experimental work is con- 
tinued throughout the course. 

421. Social Psychology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Prerequisite: Six hours in Psychology, including 103. 
In this course a study is made of the innate tendencies that are 
stimulated by other beings and their behavior. Also the organi- 
zation of group attitudes, such as cooperation, opposition, etc., 
and group habits, customs, language, and imitation. 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Biology 

Mb. Slay, Mb. Bbandt, Mb. Reynolds, Mb. DeLoach, Mrss 
"Wilton, and Miss Humphbeys 

23, 24, 25. Elements of Biology. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and two hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 



156 East Carolina Teachers College 

These are courses in practical biology intended to acquaint the 

student with the biological principles concerning man and his 

environment. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 a quarter. 

34, 35, 36. General Biology. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours each. 
These are courses in general biology intended to give the stu- 
dent an understanding of the fundamental processes of life. 
They include a study of the problems of reproduction and hered- 
ity and a study of the biological relationships between plants 
and animals, including man. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 a quarter. 

106, 107. Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Winter and spring quarters. Three lectures per week. Credit: 
three quarter hours a quarter. 

These courses consist of lectures and demonstrations by means 
of models and prepared dissections. The relation of structure 
to function in the human is stressed. 

111. Zoology (Invertebrate). 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 
a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

A survey of the invertebrates with a detailed study of repre- 
sentative forms. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

112. Zoology (Vertebrate). 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course includes a study of the simpler chordate animals, 

a study of a representative series of vertebrate animals, and the 

detailed study of one mammal. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

113. Human Physiology. 

Each quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course consists of lectures and laboratory work dealing 

with the following systems of organs; skeletal, muscular, 

digestive, respiratory, circulatory, excretory, nervous, and 

reproductive. 

Prerequisite: One year of science including biology and 

chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



Coubses of Instruction 157 

206. Nature Study. 

Fall and spring quarters. Four hours a week. Credit: three 

quarter hours. 

A study is made of the common flowers, trees, insects, birds, 

and other animals. 

Nature literature and field work supplement the lectures. 

212, 213, 214. Botany. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours each. 
Fundamental plant studies. Structure, growth, and physiology 
of seed plants, and morphology and development of the four 
major groups of the plant kingdom. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 a quarter. 

220. A.B.C. Biological Preparations. 

Fall winter and spring quarters. Six hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

Elective. 

This course is designed to give the students experience in the 

preparation of biological specimens, museum work, and visual 

aids. 

Prerequisite: one year of college biology. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

240. Field Zoology. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work or field ex- 
cursions a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
This course is planned to develop an intelligent field knowledge 
of eastern North Carolina animals in order that teachers may 
make better use of the environment in teaching. Excursions to 
typical habitats for the purpose of collecting and identifying 
animals and studying the ecological conditions under which they 
live. 
Prerequisite: A year of Biology or equivalent. 

305. Plant Ecology. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

Field study of local plant communities from the standpoint of 

environment and its controlling factors. 

Prerequisites: Biology 34, 35, 36 and Botany 212, 213 or their 

equivalent. 

Open to graduate students and seniors only. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



158 East Carolina Teachers College 

310. Bacteriology. 

Each quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

This course includes a study of yeast, mold, and bacteria with 

special emphasis on bacteria in their more intimate relations 

to man. 

Prerequisites: 18 hours of science including biology and 

chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

325. Animal Ecology. 

Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work a week. 

Credit: four quarter hours. 

A study of the relationships of animals to each other, to plants 

and to physical factors in their environments. 

Prerequisite: A year of biology. 

Open to graduate students and seniors only. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

330. Heredity. 

Spring quarter. Three hours of lecture a week and two hours 
of laboratory work per week optional. Credit: three or four 
quarter hours. 

A study of the laws of heredity and their application in evolu- 
tion and eugenics. The laboratory work includes experiments 
with the fruit fly, DrosopMla melanogaster. 
Prerequisites: Biology 34, 35, 36, or their equivalent or consent 
of instructor. 
Open to graduate students and seniors only. 

335. Plant Identification. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

Field observation, collection, identification and taxonomy of the 

higher groups of plants of Eastern North Carolina. 

Prerequisite: A year of biology. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

350. Histology. 

Fall quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 
a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

Slides of plant and animal tissues are prepared. Students learn 
to identify plant and animal tissues from these slides. Students 
are given the opportunity to prepare a collection of slides for 
their own use. 



Courses of Instruction 159 

Prerequisite: At least two years of college biology. 
Open to graduate students and seniors only. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

406. Embryology. 

"Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 
a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

The early development of the vertebrates is studied, including 
the formation of the systems of organs. The development of 
some one vertebrate is studied in the laboratory. Slides show- 
ing this development are prepared by the students. 
Prerequisite: Two years of college biology. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

408. Plant Anatomy and Morphology. 

Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 
a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

A study of the origin and development of structures found in 
vascular plants. A study of both prepared slides and fresh mate- 
rials which the student will prepare in the laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Biology 34, 35, 36 and Botany 212, 213 or their 
equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Chemistry 

40, 41, 42. General Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and two hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
An introduction to the laws, facts and theories of general chem- 
istry, with especial emphasis on practical applications. 
Laboratory fee: $2.00 and breakage. 

44, 45, 46. General Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four hours 

of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours each. 

These courses are designed for students who wish to gain a 

broad knowledge of the more interesting phases of the subject. 

Recommended for students who plan to teach in secondary 

schools. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 per quarter and breakage. 

120. Semi-Micro Qualitative Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: 

four quarter hours. 

The analysis of simple ores, alloys, and industrial products. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 



160 East Carolina Teachers College 

121. Gravimetric Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: 

four quarter hours. 

Introduction to gravimetric methods of analysis, together with 

advanced work in stoichiometry. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

122. Volumetric Analysis. 

One lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week. Credit: 
four quarter hours. 

Presentation of volumetric methods of analysis, and the under- 
lying theory. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 121 or its equivalent. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

207, 208, 209. Organic Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four hours 

of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours each. 

These courses include a study of the principal compounds of 

both the aliphatic and the aromatic series, emphasizing those 

compounds which relate to foods, fuels, and other household 

uses. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 per quarter and breakage. 

300, 301, 302. Physical Chemistry. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three lectures a week. 

Credit: three quarter hours each. 

Introduction to theoretical chemistry including the fundamental 

laws and concepts. 

Prerequisite: A year of general chemistry. 

309. Physiological Chemistry. 

"Winter quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 
a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 
Elective. 

This course includes a study of the body processes of respira- 
tion, circulation, digestion, absorption, metabolism, excretion, 
and coordination. Designed especially for home economics stu- 
dents but open to all who have had the necessary prerequisites. 
Prerequisites: 18 hours of science including Chemistry and 
human physiology. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 



Coueses or Instbuction 161 

312. Food Chemistry. 

Spring quarter. Two lectures and four hours of laboratory work 

a week. Credit: four quarter hours. 

Elective. 

Prerequisite: 24 hours of science including organic chemistry. 

A course designed to accompany a more advanced study of 

foods. Food classification, analysis, detection of adulterants, 

and tests for the detection of specific foods. 

Open to graduate students and seniors only. 

Laboratory fee, $2.00 and breakage. 

Physics 

115, 116, 117. Household Physics. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and two hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
A study of laboratory projects in physics with special applica- 
tion to household uses, emphasis being placed on the study of 
heating systems, electrical appliances in the home, water sup- 
ply, illumination, heat conduction, etc. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 per quarter. 

180. Physics— Sound. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
An elementary course in physics for music students. This course 
deals with the scientific principles of musical sounds, acoustics, 
and the mathematical basis of scale formation. Open to music 
majors only. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 per quarter. 

215, 216, 217. General Physics. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Two lectures and four hours 
of laboratory work a week. Credit: four quarter hours each. 
Courses of lectures, recitations, and individual laboratory work 
covering the divisions of mechanics, heat, light, sound, magne- 
tism, and electricity. The purpose of the courses is to acquaint 
the student with physical terms and quantities and an apprecia- 
tion of the laws that underlie physical science. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00 per quarter. 

Physical Science 

171, 172, 173. General Science. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Three hours a week. Credit: 
three quarter hours each. 



162 East Carolina Teachers College 

A survey course in general science designed to meet the needs 
(1) of those students who desire a fundamental knowledge of 
scientific principles, and (2) for those students planning to 
teach general science in high school. 
Open to all students. 

200. Mineralogy. 

Each quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes a study of the more common minerals. 
'Emphasis is placed on the commercial use of minerals in every- 
day life. 
Open to students of sophomore or junior standing. 

316. Descriptive Astronomy. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes a descriptive study of the heavenly bodies 
and their relation to man and his daily activities. 
This course is open to all students of junior standing. 

318. Elements of Photography. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A thoroughly scientific course designed to meet the desires of 
those students who wish a comprehensive knowledge of the 
scientific background and the fundamental techniques of pho- 
tography which they will be able to put to practical use. 
Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Science Education 

223a. Materials and Methods in Senior High School Science. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and class discus- 
sions on the materials and methods used in the teaching of 
science in the senior high school. 

223b. Materials and Methods in Junior High School Science. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course includes lectures, demonstrations, and class discus- 
sions on the materials and methods used in the teaching of 
science in the junior high school. 

223c. Materials and Methods in Elementary Science. 

Winter quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter 
hours. 

This course consists of lectures, demonstration, and class dis- 
cussions on the materials and methods used in the teaching of 
elementary science. 



Courses of Instruction 163 

322 a.b.c. Apprenticeship Science. 

Fall, winter, and spring quarters. Credit: three quarter hours. 
Open to science majors of junior or senior standing. 

324. Observation and Supervised Teaching. 

One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 

400. a.b.c. Seminar in Science Education. 

Two hours a week. Three quarters. Credit: six quarter hours. 
(See Education 400 a.b.c.) 

410. Contemporary Science. 

Fall, winter or spring quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: 

three quarter hours. 

Lectures, readings, reports, and discussions concerning the 

development of scientific thought with emphasis on recent 

advances. 

Prerequisite: Two years of college science. 

420. Investigations in Elementary Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A course designed to offer opportunities for special investiga- 
tions in the field of elementary science. 

430. The Teaching of General Science in Secondary Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit : three quarter hours. 
This course deals with content, methods, laboratory work, 
equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings of the intro- 
ductory course in high school science. Attention will be given 
to the special studies made in the field of general science. 

440. Teaching of the Biological Sciences in Secondary Schools. 

Fall quarter. Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the content, methods, laboratory work, 
equipment, textbooks, tests, and reference readings of the high 
school course in biology. Attention is given to the special studies 
made in the field of the high school biological studies. 

455. Experimental Evaluations in Science Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the evaluation of science texts and 
reference material; classroom and laboratory equipment; and 
the coordination of the various sciences. 



164 East Carolina Teachebs College 

465. Current Problems in Science Education. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the current investigations in science 
education ; critical evaluations of techniques, materials, results, 
and conclusions. 

475>. Historical Development of School Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course traces the development of the study of science 

from its early stages to the present time. Special emphasis is 

placed upon the development of the present-day secondary school 

sciences. 

480. Advanced Problems in the Physical Sciences. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the fusion of chemistry and physics as 
experienced in natural settings. Many demonstrations are 
included. 

485. The Lives and Works of Great Men of Science. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the development of science as portrayed 
by the contributions of noted scientists. The private lives and 
environments of these individuals will be stressed. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Mb. Wright, Mb. Flanagan, and Mb. Toll 

It is the purpose of the department of Social Science to ac- 
quaint the student with patterns of behavior that man has 
followed and is now following as a member of society and also 
the behavior patterns of the group. This Department includes 
Government, Economics, and Sociology. 

10. Personality and Social Adjustment. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of character traits and the formation of personality. 

Open to Freshmen and Sophomores. 

100. Introduction to Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is designed to introduce the student to the general 

field of society and its problems. 

For Freshmen and Sophomores. 



Courses of Instruction 165 

101. Rural Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A continuation of Sociology 100. This course deals essentially 

with rural social problems, such as farm tenancy, rural health, 

the rural church, the rural family, rural welfare work and the 

general structure of rural population. 

For Freshmen and Sophomores. 

102. Urban Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A continuation of Sociology 100 and 101, dealing essentially 
with the social structure and the problems of the city. 
For Freshmen and Sophomores. 

202. Principles of Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with the origin of man and development of 
culture, with emphasis upon the physiographic, biological, 
psychological, and cultural factors in social life. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

203. Principles of Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The course is a continuation of Sociology 202. Stress is laid on 

the origin and development of some of the major social 

institutions. 

Prerequisite; Junior standing. 

204. Principles of Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is a continuation of Sociology 203 and deals 

essentially with the evolution of culture. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

205. The Family. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the forms and functions of the family, with an 

attempt to analyze the present-day problems of the family. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

Open to graduate students. 

208. Educational Sociology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the school as a social institution, and the sociological 

background of curricula and methods. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 



166 East Carolina Teachers College 

210. The Administration of Public Welfare. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A historical study of the administration of public welfare and 

recent legislation covering social security. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

211. Community Resources, Agencies, and Organizations. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A community survey, analyzing its resources and the functions 

performed by its agencies and organizations. 

Required of all Home Economics majors, and open only to them. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

220. Elementary Social Science. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A content course in social science for grammar-grade teachers. 
Selected materials from the field of social science that are suit- 
able for children in the grades. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

240. Teaching Apprenticeship in Social Science. 

Five hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

The purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with 

class routine, teaching techniques and classroom management. 

The work may be done in either sociology, economics or 

government. 

250. A Eield Trip in Sociology. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course covers a trip to New York City by way of the 
Shenandoah Valley, and returning by way of Baltimore, Annap- 
olis, and Washington, D. C. Ths is offered in connection with 
Government 250. 
Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

251. A Field Trip in Sociology. 

Credit: three quarter hours. 

This trip goes to Florida and Cuba by way of the West coast, 

the Everglades, and Miami. The East coast is followed on the 

return, stopping at Palm Beach, Jacksonville, Savannah, Ga., 

and Charleston, S. C. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 



Courses of Instruction 167 

253. A Field Course in Sociology. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course covers a tour to New York City and the Bermuda 

Islands. 

Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

254. A Field Course in Sociology. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course covers a tour of the western states to California. 
Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

304. Marriage. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
A study of the fundamental relationships involved in the insti- 
tution of marriage, essential attitudes and knowledge for 
marital adjustment and success. 
Prerequisite : Junior standing. 

306. Crime and Delinquency. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A discussion and analysis of theories of criminology and 

punishment. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

401. Racial Anthropology. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the origin and development of the races of man. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

402. The Development of Social Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A history of social thought, including the outstanding social 

philosophies of the past and their influence in the development 

of culture. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

403. Social Legislation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A survey of the major types of social legislation in the United 

States and especially in North Carolina. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

Economics 

101. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course gives an introduction to the major economic proh- 



168 East Carolina Teachers College 

lems, such as the economic organization for production, forms 
of the business unit, large scale production and combinations, 
organization of marketing and transportation, economic func- 
tions of government, forces determining price, supply, demand, 
cost of production, competition, and monopoly. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

102. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course is a continuation of Economics 101. Topics treated 
include: money, banking, money and price, the business cycle, 
international trade and exchange, economics of transportation, 
industrial monopoly and its control, risks, insurance, specula- 
tion, nature and factors of consumption, consumption and 
saving. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

103. Introduction to Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course is a continuation of Economics 102. Topics treated 

include: distribution of wealth and income, rents, interests, 

wages, profits, population problems, taxation and public finance, 

problems of labor, labor unions and union policies, industrial 

conflict, industrial peace and industrial government, proposed 

reforms of the economic system. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor. 

104. Investment of Savings. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The purpose of this course is to show how persons of small 
income can save, invest, and build up an income from their 
savings if they wish to do so. Topics treated include: the 
economics of savings; the psychology of saving; opportunity 
for investing; interest accumulations; time deposits; savings 
banks; insurance; building and loan associations; annuities; 
mortgages; bonds, government bonds; real estate bonds; in- 
dustrial bonds; stocks; choosing your adviser; the stock ex- 
change; the pit; speculation and gambling; and such other 
topics as time permits. 
Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

105. Rural Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course deals with the major rural economics problems 

with special reference to North Carolina. 

Elective for Sophomores and Juniors. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 



Coueses of Instruction 169 

110. Consumer Economics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course deals with established economic principles from the 
viewpoint of the consumer, especially consumer buying, stand- 
ards for consumers, producers aids to consumers and govern- 
ment aids to the consumers. 
Open to anyone. 

201. Money and Banking. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the forms and functions of money, credit and credit 

problems. Commercial banking, with particular emphasis upon 

its development in the United States. 

Prerequisite: Economics 101 or 102. 

202. Labor Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This is an introductory course in labor problems. It is intended 
to give the student a brief survey of the whole field of labor 
problems. A rapid survey is made of such topics as standards 
of living; wealth, income and wages; hours of labor; unem- 
ployment; women and children in industry; labor organiza- 
tions; industrial unrest and socialism; industrial education; 
labor legislation; social insurance. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or 6 hours in economics. 

301. Business Organization and Practice. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
The aim in this course is to give the student a practical knowl- 
edge of the way in which our commercial and industrial 
agencies are organized and financed, and how business is con- 
ducted. It treats of such topics as kinds of business organiza- 
tion; Incorporation; reorganization; financing, buying and 
selling; corporation control; attitude toward stockholders and 
labor. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

302. Public Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of public revenue and expenditure, principles and 

system of taxation. 

Prerequisite: Economics 101 and 102 or their equivalent. 



170 East Carolina Teachers College 

310. Introduction to Railway Transportation. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the economic and administrative phases of railway 

transportation in the United States. Such topics are treated as 

financial organization; rates and rate making; state and federal 

regulation; government operation; government ownership; 

current railroad problems. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing. 

402, 403. Advanced Labor Problems. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

An intensive and critical study of the major problems of 

industrial relations. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 

410, 411. Problems in Public Finance. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 

A summary sketch of principles of public finance, followed by 

an intensive and critical study of tax systems, and of the 

various policies and programs adopted by governments for 

raising and spending revenue. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. 

420, 421. History of Economic Thought. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours each. 
These courses treat such topics as the origin, nature, and 
development of economic thought; economic thought of the 
ancients; the evolution of economics as a science; general 
account of recent leading schools of economic thought. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 9 hours in elementary 
economics. 

Government 

1. An Introductory Course in American Government. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course takes up the principles upon which our state and 
national governments are based, and how the American concept 
of democracy has been put into operation. 
Open to anybody. 

102. Social Civics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A course designed to prepare teachers for teaching Citizenship 

in the grades. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 



Courses of Instruction 171 

105. Civics: Highway Safety. 

One hour a week. Credit: one quarter hour. 
This course is designed to teach the principles of highway safety 
and to prepare teachers to teach this subject in the grades and 
high school. 

201. Political Parties and Politics. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course treats briefly of the development of political parties 
in the United States with a more intensive study of present-day 
national parties and politics. It treats such topics as the party 
platform; nominating methods; party machinery; campaign 
methods; suffrage qualifications; election laws; the spoils sys- 
tem; the civil service reform; machines and bosses; practical 
politics in legislative bodies; remedies for legislative evils. 
Prerequisite: Junior standing or Government 101. 

202. Comparative Government. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

An inquiry into the principles and merits of the different forms 

of government. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

223. The Teaching of Social Science in the High School. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
This course covers subject matter in Social Science for the 
High School and the technique of presentation. Designed 
especially for Social Science majors. 
See Education 223 s.s. 

250. A Field Trip in Government. 
Credit: three quarter hours. 

This course consists of a trip to New York City by way of the 
Shenandoah Valley and returns by way of Baltimore, Annapolis, 
and Washington, D. C. This is offered in connection with 
Sociology 250. Open to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors. 

302. North Carolina State, County, and Municipal Government. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 
An intensive study of the State government of North Carolina, 
including its subdivisions. 
Prerequisite: Government 1. 

324. Practice Teaching in Social Science. 

One quarter. Nine hours a week. Credit: six quarter hours. 
Required of all Social Science majors. 



172 East Carolina Teachers College 

401. International Relations. 

Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of international organization and relationships. 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 

402. The Growth of Constitutional Government. 
Three hours a week. Credit: three quarter hours. 

A study of the history and growth of constitutional develop- 
ment with emphasis upon the sources of the American Con- 
stitution. 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing. 



STUDENTS ATTENDING 
EAST CAROLINA TEACHERS COLLEGE 

June 5, 1941 to June 1, 1942 



Name Class Address County 

Abernathy, Beatrice Senior G Nashville, N. C Nash 

Abeyounis, B. G Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Abeyounis, Eugenia Senior H. S. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Adams, Eva M Fresh. H.S. . . . Benson, N. C Johnston 

Adams, Thelma Senior G Benson, N. C Johnston 

Adley, Elizabeth Senior P Dunn, N. C Harnett 

Albritton, Mrs. Annie L. Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Albritton, Martha Fresh. H.S Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Aldridge, Marvin W Fresh. H.S Vanceboro, N. C Craven 

Alexander, Dennis W.. . .Soph. H.S Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Alexander, Violet Special Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Alford, Ruth Fresh. H.S.. . .Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Allen, J. F Senior H.S.. . .Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Allen, Lucile Senior G Benson, N. C Johnston 

Allen, Ruth Soph. H.S Creedmoor, N. C Granville 

Alphin, Deland Fresh. H.S Pinetops, N. C Edgecombe 

Alston, Edith Mae Soph. H.S Weldon, N. C Halifax 

Aman, Jessilu Soph. P Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Ambrose, Doris Marie. . .Soph. G Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Amick, Jeanette Junior P Mebane, N. C.< Alamance 

Anderson, Bessie Senior H.S. . . .Middlesex, N. C Nash 

Andrews, Mildred L Senior H.S.. . .Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Andrews, Orville D Senior H.S. . . .Rocky Mount, N. C Edgecombe 

Arrington, Mary Junior P Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

Arthur, Esther Faye .... Fresh. P La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Asbell, Kathleen Senior G Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Asbell, Margenette Senior H.S.. . .Sunbury, N. C Gates 

Atkinson, Matalie Fresh. H.S.. . .Roanoke Rapids, N. C. Halifax 

Atkinson, Sally M Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Atkinson, Virginia Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Ausley, Edith Senior P Micro, N. C Johnston 

Austin, Mary Kate Senior H.S. . . . Peachland, N. C Union 

Autry, Mary Kate Senior P Salemburg, N. C Sampson 

Averette, Frances Senior P Wake Forest, N. C Wake 

Averett, Louise Junior H.S. . . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Avery, Dora Belle Junior P Clayton, N. C Johnston 

Avery, Mitchell Soph. H.S.. . .Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Avery, Quentin Fresh. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Aycock, Kathleen Fresh. H.S. . . .Fremont, N. C Wayne 

Aycock, Mary Lou Fresh. H.S. . . .Fremont, N. C Wayne 



Aycock, Mildred Sen 

Aycock, Mildred Lee. . . . Jun 

Bailey, Alene Jun 

Bailey, Mary T Sen 

Baker, Hazel Sen 

Baker, Margie Sen: 

Baker, Martha Reid. . . .Sen 



or H.S. . . .Lucama, N. C Wilson 

or G Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

or H.S.. . .Walstonburg, N. C Greene 

or P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

or G Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

or G Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

or P Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 



Baldwin, Mrs. Kemp H. Graduate Archdale, N. C Randolph 



174 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Ballance, Bernice Junior H.S Lake Landing, N. C....Hyde 

Ballance, Idalene Soph. G Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Ballance, Mavis Soph. H.S. Maple, N. C Currituck 

Ballantine, Dorothy J Junior H.S Clarkton, N. C Bladen 

Ballantine, Jessie Fresh. H.S Clarkton, N. C Bladen 

Ballard, Jennings Senior H.S Alexis, N. C Lincoln 

Barefoot, Eloise Junior G Benson, N. C Johnston 

Barker, Elsie Senior G Trenton, N. C. . * Jones 

Barkley, Delia Senior P Severn, N. C Northampton 

Barkley, Henry Soph. H.S Elm City, N. C Wilson 

Barkley, Kathleen Senior H.S. . . . Elm City, N. C Wilson 

Barnes, Jonnie Faye. . . . Soph. P Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Barnes, Margaret Junior P Pinetops, N. C Edgecombe 

Barnes, Nellie Reece. . . .Junior P Clayton, N. C Johnston 

Barnes, William Ralph. .Fresh. H.S.. . .Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Barnes, Mrs. W. T. Unclassified. . . Chocowinity, N. C Beaufort 

Barnette, Beatrice Junior H.S.. . .Buxton, N. C Dare 

Barnett, Wilma Fresh. H.S Southport, N. C Brunswick 

Barnhardt, Bess Senior H.S.. . .Acme, N. C Columbus 

Barnhill, Aldine Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Barnhill, Catherine Junior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Barnhill, Ellen Fresh. G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Barnhill, Isabelle Fresh. H.S.. . .Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Bartholomew, Annie B..Soph. H.S Spring Hope, N. C Nash 

Bartling, Carol Junior P New Bern, N. C Craven 

Bass, Bertie Mae Graduate Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Bass, Juanita Senior G Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Bass, Mary Elta Fresh. P Newton Grove, N. C. .Sampson 

Batchelor, Alleene Soph. G Jonesboro, N. C Lee 

Batchelor, Frances Fresh. G Apex, N. C Wake 

Batchelor, Malta Clark. .Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Batchelor, Maydell Junior P Jonesboro, N. C Lee 

Batchelor, Ruby Junior G Apex, N. C Wake 

Bateman, Rena Soph. H.S Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Batson, Elizabeth Anne. Fresh. P Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Batten, Estelle Junior P Selma, N. C Johnston 

Batten, Polly Elizabeth. .Soph. H.S Selma, N. C. Johnston 

Baucom, Alfred Junior H.S Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Baum, Katrina Senior P Swan Quarter, N. C Hyde 

Beachum, Jane Junior H.S.. . .Star, N. C Montgomery 

Beam, Betty Claire Senior H.S.. . .Grover, N. C Cleveland 

Beaman, Sybil Fresh. P New Bern, N. C Craven 

Beard, Gladys D Junior P Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Becton, Eugenia Junior H.S.. . .Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Beddard, Nell Senior G Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Beddard, Russell Senior H.S.. . . Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Beddingfield, Charlotte. .Senior P Millbrook, N. C Wake 

Belch, Arline Senior H.S. . . .Coleraine, N. C Bertie 

Belche, Myrtle Leigh Senior G Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Bell, Annette J Junior P Newport, N. C Carteret 

Bell, Leola Mae Senior G Arapahoe, N. C Pamlico 

Bell, Lucille Senior G Rocky Mount, N. C. . .Nash 

Bell, Vida Senior P Zebulon, N. C Wake 

Benson, Erma Senior G Benson, N. C Johnston 

Bennett, Alma Louise. . .Junior G Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Bennett, Billie Marie Junior H.S.. . .Burnsville, N. C Yancey 

Benson, Mary Senior P Benson, N. C Johnston 



List of Students 175 

Name Class Address County 

Benton, Rachel Fresh. H.S. . . .Cerro Gordo, N. C Columbus 

Bergeron, Mamie H Fresh. H.S. . . .Spring Hope, N. C Nash 

Betts, Edgar N., Jr Fresh. H.S Albemarle, N. C Stanly 

Beverly, Mildred Junior H.S Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Bishop, Elizabeth L Junior H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Bissette, Camilla Senior G Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Bizzell, Ella Ruth Junior H.S. . . .Newton Grove, N. C Sampson 

Blackham, Mary Alice. . .Junior H.S.. . .Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Blackmon, Vennie Junior H.S. . . .Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Blanchard, Ada Lillian. .Senior P Woodland, N. C Northampton 

Blanchard, Helen Soph. G Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Blanchard, Mary Fresh. H.S Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Bland, Cecil.... Fresh. H.S.. . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Bledsoe, Virginia L Soph. H.S New Bern, N. C Craven 

Blount, Jean Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Blount, Judson Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Blow, Alice Leigh Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Blue, Blennie Mae Soph. G Carthage, N. C Moore 

Boney, Alma Fresh. P Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Boney, Dorothy Junior P Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Bonner, Lona E Senior G Swan Quarter, N. C. . . . Hyde 

Boone, Margaret Ruth . . Junior P Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Bordeaux, Charlotte. . . . Soph. H.S Lillington, N. C Harnett 

Bostic, Marlow F Soph. H.S Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Bostic, Melza Senior H.S. . . .Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Boswell, Doris. Fresh. H.S.. . .Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Boswell, Dorothy Junior G Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Boswell, Gretchen Fresh. H.S.. . .Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Bottoms, Mary Lee Fresh. H.S.. . . Margarettsville, N. C. . Northampton 

Bowden, Alma Gray. . . .Fresh. H.S.. . .Portsmouth, Va 

Bowen, Alma Soph. H.S Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Bowen, Hazel Senior H.S. . . .Willard, N. C Pender 

Bowers, Mary Hazel. . . .Senior P Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

Bowling, Flora T Senior G Woodard, N. C Bertie 

Boyd, Anna Belle Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Boyd, Frances M Senior G Lane, S. C 

Boyd, Kathryn L Soph. H.S Jackson, N. C Northampton 

Boyd, Raychel Senior H.S Pinetown, N. C Beaufort 

Boyette, Dorothea Fresh. H.S.. . .Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Boyette, Lillian M Soph. P Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Boykin, Hazel Senior P Micro, N. C Johnston 

Bradley, Edith T Senior P Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Bradley, Verna Rae Senior G Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Edgecombe 

Branch, Julia Senior H.S. . . . Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Branch, Mrs. Rosalind T. Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Brandon, Nell Junior H.S.. . .Yadkinville, N. C Yadkin 

Braswell, Marion Fresh. G . . Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Braxton, Janice J Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Bray, Ruth Senior H.S Elizabeth City, N. C. . . Pasquotank 

Breece, David Senior H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Brendle, Elsie Senior H.S. . . . Bryson City, N. C Swain 

Brett, Louise Junior G Como, N. C Hertford 

Brewer, Frances Fresh. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Briggs, Lydia Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Briggs, Nannie Mae Senior P Hurdle Mills, N. C Person 

Brinkley, Jennie Mae Senior P Coleraine, N. C Bertie 

Brinkley, Nelle Fresh. H.S. . . . Durham, N. C Durham 

Brinson, Helen I Fresh. H.S Pollocksville, N. C Jones 



176 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Britt, Callie B Special Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Britt, Dola Senior P Orrum, N. C Robeson 

Britt, Fara Rae Soph. P Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Britt, Freda Senior P Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Britt, Lena Rose Senior G Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Britt, Rose Louise Senior H.S. . . . Severn, N. C Northampton 

Britt, Ruth Senior H.S.. . .Wendell, N. C Wake 

Britton, Clifton Graduate Milwaukee, N. C Northampton 

Britton, Corinne Fresh. G Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Britton, Lois Lee Senior H.S.. . .Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Britton, Mary E Fresh. P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Britton, Virginia Dare. . .Soph. G Pendleton, N. C Northampton 

Broadwell, Thelma Fresh. H.S Selma, N. C Johnston 

Brock, Doris V Fresh. H.S. . . . Kenansville, N. C Duplin 

Broome, Lewellyn T Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Broughton, Alma Junior G Merritt, N. C Pamlico 

Broughton, Margaret Junior H.S Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Brown, Adrian Senior H.S.. . .Parkton, N. C Robeson 

Brown, Anna Lea Junior P Rockingham, N. C Richmond 

Brown, Doris H Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Brown, Doris Junior G Pine Level, N. C Johnston 

Brown, Edith Fresh. P Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Brown, Edward O Soph. H.S Colerain, N. C Bertie 

Brown, Harold F Graduate Vanceboro, N. C Craven 

Brown, J. Elizabeth Fresh. G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Brown, Katharine Senior H.S.. . .Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Brown, Margaret Stroud. Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Brown, Marjorie Soph. H.S Bailey, N. C Nash 

Brown, Mary Elizabeth. . Senior H.S Gatesville, N. C Gates 

Brown, Mary Quinn .... Senior G Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Brown, Norma Lyde. . . .Soph. H.S Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Brown, Rachel Junior G Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Brown, Rosalie Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Brown, Sibyl Senior P Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Brown, Velner Merrill. . . Soph. G Lasker, N. C Northampton 

Brown, Wiley Junior H.S Parkton, N. C Robeson 

Browning, Elizabeth W. .Junior H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Bryan, Mary Fresh. H.S La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Bryant, Catherine C Senior P Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Buck, Edith Fresh. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Bullard, Anne Senior P Rowland, N. C Robeson 

Bullock, Elsie Mae Soph. P Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Bullock, Helen Fresh. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Bullock, Inez Fresh. H.S Lillington, N. C Harnett 

Bullock, James Earl Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Bullock, Martha Lois Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Bullock, Vera Felton. . . .Special Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Bulluck, Viola E Soph. P Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Edgecombe 

Bunch, Georgia Soph. G Hobbsville, N. C Chowan 

Burch, Betty Soph. H.S Matthews, N. C Mecklenburg 

Burden, Nancy Gray Junior P Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Burden, Nancy L Fresh. H.S Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Burks, William M Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Burney, Cleo Senior H.S. . . .Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Burns, Elizabeth Senior H.S Delco, N. C Columbus 

Burns, Emily Soph. H.S Goldston, N. C Chatham 

Burns, Sylvia Senior H.S.. . .Siler City, N. C Chatham 

Burton, Robert Senior H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 



List of Students 177 

Name Class Address County 

Butler, Doris Fresh. G Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Butler, Gatsey T Senior P Falcon, N. C Cumberland 

Butler, Jerome Soph. H.S Scotland Neck, N. C. . .Halifax 

Butler, Martha Senior H.S Tabor City, N. C Columbus 

Butner, Helen E Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Butt, Mary Virginia. . . .Soph. H.S Aurora, N. C Beaufort 

Buxton, Agnes Junior H.S.. . .Westboro, Mass 

Byrd, Annie Gray Senior P Bailey, N. C Wilson 

Byrum, Margaret W. . . .Junior H.S.. . .Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Cade, Aleene Evelyn. . . .Fresh. P Fuquay Springs, N. C. .Harnett 

Caine, Edna Dorothy. . .Junior P Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Cain, Lois M Junior G Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Cain, Lota Gertrude. . . .Fresh. G Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Calhoun, Ella Bland. . . Junior H.S Rocky Mount, N. C. . .Edgecombe 

Campbell, Edna. Senior G Halifax, N. C Halifax 

Campbell, Jennie Fresh. P Dunn, N. C Harnett 

Canady, Aleathia Graduate Bath, N. C Beaufort 

Canady, Louise Soph. H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Carawan, Dorothy Fresh. H.S. . . . Pantego, N. C Beaufort 

Carawan, Ella Soph. H.S Swan Quarter, N. C Hyde 

Carowan, Zalia D Junior P Pantego, N. C Beaufort 

Carr, Sybil P Fresh. G Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Carraway, Verna .Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Carroll, Mrs. Ellen L. . . .Senior G Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Carson, Don Jr Fresh. H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Carson, John F Senior H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Carson, John Royal Fresh. H.S. . . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Carson, Mary Louise. . . .Fresh. H.S Jamesville, N. C Martin 

Carter, Carlotta Junior H.S.. . .Washington, N. C. . . . .Beaufort 

Carter, Frances Fresh. H.S. . . . Woodland, N. C Northampton 

Carter, Kathleen Fresh. G Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Carter, Louise Senior G Woodland, N. C Northampton 

Carter, McCree Senior G Rose Hill, N. C Sampson 

Carter, Nell Louise Soph. H.S Hobbsville, N. C Gates 

Cash, Margaret Junior G Wendell, N. C Wake 

Cassick, Frances Allen . . .Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cates, Elizabeth Fresh. G Timberlake, N. C Person 

Cavanaugh, Evelyn Junior H.S.. . .Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Cavanaugh, Sara Junior P Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Chadwick, Leslie Fresh. H.S. . . .Gloucester, N. C Carteret 

Chambliss, Robert Junior H.S.. . .Triplet, Va 

Chandler, Louise Junior G Virgilina, Va 

Chandler, Ruth Senior G Virgilina, Va 

Chapman, Murle Tucker. Soph. P Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Chappell, Dixie Fresh. G Belvidere, N. C Perquimans 

Chappell, Grace Senior G Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Chappell, Mary Louise. .Senior H.S.. . .Belvidere, N. C Perquimans 

Chason, Vernon Senior G Lumber Bridge, N. C. Robeson 

Cheek, Theresa Fresh. H.S Mebane, N. C Alamance 

Cherry, Elsie Mae Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cherry, Elsie Senior H.S Pactolus, N. C Pitt 

Chesson, Nancy Senior P Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Christenbury, Annie Mae Fresh. H.S. . . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Clark, Emma Grace Soph. G Everetts, N. C Martin 

Clark, Gertrude Soph. H.S Columbia, N. C Tyrrell 

Clark, Ida Florine Fresh. H.S Everetts, N. C Martin 

Clark, Thelma Senior G Virgilina, Va 

12 



178 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Clemmons, Margaret. . . .Senior P Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Clement, Dorothy Senior G Nelson, Va 

Clifton, Ruby P Soph. P Sanford, N. C Lee 

Cline, Margaret E Junior H.S.. . .Shelby, N. C Cleveland 

Cobb, Doris Fresh. H.S. . . . La Grange, N. C Greene 

Cobb, Sallie Marie Soph. H.S Merry Hill, N. C Bertie 

Cobb, Mrs. Frances Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cockrell, Jimmy Junior H.S. . . .Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Cockrell, Rebecca Soph. P Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Coiner, Francis M Fresh. H.S. . . . New Bern, N. C Craven 

Coker, Elwanda Soph. H.S Whitakers, N. C Edgecombe 

Cole, Ethel Fresh. H.S.. . .Biscoe, N. C Moore 

Collie, Helen Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Collie, Rose Senior H.S. . . .Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Collins, Emily Ann Junior P Nashville, N. C Nash 

Collins, Evelyn Gaddy. . .Fresh. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Collins, Roena Soph. H.S Angier, N. C Harnett 

Collins, Sarah Fresh. G Angier, N. C Harnett 

Cone, Ruby Senior P Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Conner, Carolyn Graduate Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Conyers, Evelyn Junior G Franklinton, N. C Franklin 

Cook, Nina H Soph. H.S Timberlake, N. C Person 

Cooke, Virginia Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cooper, Fannie S Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cooper, Fred L Unclassified. . .Roanoke Rapids, N. C. Halifax 

Cooper, Jean P Soph. P Whitakers, N. C Edgecombe 

Cooper, Meljones Junior G Warsaw, N. C Duplin 

Copeland, Alice F Fresh. H.S. . . . Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Copeland, Frances Soph. H.S Fremont, N. C Wayne 

Copeland, Jane Senior P Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Copeland, Mildred Fresh. H.S.. . .Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Copeland, Willie Soph. G Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Coppedge, Rachel Senior P Spring Hope, N. C Nash 

Corbett, Elsie Fresh. H.S. . . .Gatesville, N.C Gates 

Corbett, Tommie Lou. . .Senior H.S.. . .Gatesville, N. C Gates 

Cordell, Garnette Soph. H.S Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Corey, Charlotte Ruth. . .Soph. P Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Council, Leona Junior H.S. . . .Cameron, N. C Moore 

Council, William Fresh. H.S.. . .Durham, N. C Durham 

Covert, Janet Louise. . . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Portsmouth, Va 

Covington, Josephine Senior G Rockingham, N. C Richmond 

Coward, Frances Soph. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Cowper, Edith W Unclassified. . .Gates, N. C Gates 

Cowper, Jeanne Special Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Cox, Carlyle L Fresh. H.S Robersonville, N. C Martin 

Cox, Elmer M Junior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cox, La Verne Senior H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Cox, Lucille Soph. H.S Robersonville, N. C. . . . Martin 

Cox, Margaret Junior P Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Cox, Mary Elma Soph. P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Cox, Sarah Elizabeth. .. .Senior G Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Cox, Thomas E Senior H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Cozart, Mary Alice Soph. H.S Oxford, N. C Granville 

Cozart, Wilma Fresh. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Crandell, Samuel H Junior H.S.. . .Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Crank, Henry E Senior H.S. . . .Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Craven, Charles Soph. H.S Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

Crawford, Elizabeth Fresh. G Pikeville, N. C Wayne 



List of Students 179 

Name Class Address County 

Crawford, Nelle Fresh. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Crawley, Waldorf S Unclassified. . .Raeford, N. C Hoke 

Creech, Barbara Senior G Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Creech, Helen Fresh. P Micro, N. C Johnston 

Crenshaw, Sue B Junior P Oxford, N. C Granville 

Crew, Miriam Junior P.". . . . .Pleasant Hill, N. C. . . . Northampton 

Crews, Olive C Soph. H.S Franklinton, N. C Franklin 

Crisp, Blanche Junior H.S.. . .Oak City, N. C Martin 

Crisp, Ora Everette Soph. H.S Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Critcher, Alma Lee Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Critcher, Miriam Junior P Oxford, N. C Granville 

Crocker, Garnette L Fresh. H.S. . . .Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Crocker, Margaret Junior H.S.. . .Grover, N. C Cleveland 

Croftin, Mary B Senior G Williamston, N. C Martin 

Cromartie Eleanora R. . . Senior H.S. . . . Garland, N. C Bladen 

Croom, Clellie Mae Junior H.S.. . .Youngsville, N. C Franklin 

Croom, Ethel Ives Junior G Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Crosby, Doris Soph. P Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Cross, Frances Fresh. H.S. . . . Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 

Cummings, Louise Junior G Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Nash 

Currin, Jane E Junior H.S.. . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Currin, Josephine Fresh. P Creedmoor, N. C Granville 

Currin, Joyce Fresh. G Angier, N. C Harnett 

Currin, Sara Fresh. H.S.. . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Cushman, Charles L Fresh. H.S.. . . Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Cutts, Mary Frances. . . .Senior H.S Stovall, N. C Granville 

Dail, Celia Blanche Senior H.S.. . .Durant's Neck, N. C. .Perquimans 

Dail, Louise Senior G. . . . . . Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Dailey, Jean Fresh. G Shawboro, N. C Currituck 

Dalrymple, Dorothy. . . .Senior H.S. . . .Jonesboro, N. C Lee 

Daniel, Mary Long Fresh. G Littleton, N. C Halifax 

Daniels, Mary S Junior P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Daniels, Willie Mae Fresh. H.S. . . . Oxford, N. C Granville 

Darden, Marie Fresh. H.S Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Darden, Mary Elizabeth . Junior H.S. . . .Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Darden, Nancy C Junior G Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Daugherty, Elsie Mae. . .Senior H.S. . . .Dover, N. C Craven 

Daughtery, Cynthia Senior P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Davenport, Madaline Senior P Oak City, N. C Martin 

David, Julia M Senior H.S. . . . Swansboro, N. C Onslow 

Davis, Annie Mae Senior G Rocky Mount, N. C Edgecombe 

Davis, Bonnie L Soph. G Micro, N. C Johnston 

Davis, Doris Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Davis, Dorothy Rae. . . .Soph. G Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Davis, Elsie V Fresh. H.S. . . .Hobgood, N. C Halifax 

Davis, Estelle Junior G Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Davis, Louise Tadlock. . .Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Davis, Lucille. Fresh. H.S.. . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Davis, Marjorie G Junior P Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Davis, Norma Senior H.S Marshallberg, N. C. . . . Carteret 

Davis, Ruth E .Senior H.S.. . .Hillsboro, N. C Orange 

Davis, Ruth P Soph. G Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Davis, Sybil L Fresh. H.S Kings Mountain, N. C. Cleveland 

Dawson, Annadell Soph. H.S Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Dawson, Elizabeth Junior P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Dawson, Doris Senior P Seven Springs, N. C Wayne 

Deal, Mary Agnes Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 



180 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Dean, Florence Senior G Oxford, N. C Granville 

Dean, Julia Zelma Senior P Oxford, N. C Granville 

Dean, Wilma Soph. G Oxford, N. C Granville 

Dees, Sarah Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Deese, Wistena Soph. H.S Monroe, N. C Union 

Denmark, Jeanne P Fresh. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Denning, Annie Laurie. .Junior G Benson, N. C Johnston 

Denning, Rachel Junior G Angier, N. C Harnett 

Denny, Dorothy Fresh. P Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Denton, Edgar Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Dewar, Mildred Junior H.S Fuquay Springs, N. C. .Harnett 

Dixon, Annie Flora Fresh. H.S Mount Olive, N. C Duplin 

Dixon, Carolyn Soph. H.S Vanceboro, N. C Craven 

Dixon, Mrs. Hubert Unclassified. . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Dixon, Jane S Junior P New Bern, N. C Craven 

Dixon, Rachel M Soph. H.S Alliance, N. C Pamlico 

Dixon, Robert T Graduate Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Dixon, Virginia O Senior P Leasburg, N. C Person 

Djiovanidas, George C. .Soph. H.S Hopewell, Va 

Dobson, Mary Katheryn. Graduate Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Donaldson, Jerome Senior H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Downing, Yvonne Senior H.S Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Draughon, Grace Junior H.S.. . .Dunn, N. C Harnett 

Drum, Geneva Senior H.S Newton, N. C Catawba 

Dudley, Margie Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Dunbar, Henry Osborne. Soph. H.S Wenona, N. C Washington 

Durham, Joyce L. Junior H.S Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Dunn, Lena Junior P Roberdell, N. C Richmond 

Dunn, Nellie Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Dunn, Rose Carlton Senior P Rocky Mount, N. C Nash 

Dunn, Sena Senior G Roberdell, N. C Richmond 

Duval, Doris Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Eakes, Frances Mae Fresh. H.S Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Eakes, Janie Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Eakes, Norma Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Eakes, Sybil Fresh. H.S. . . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Eakins, Espey Soph. H.S Ivanhoe, N. C Pender 

Earley, Monteene Unclassified. .. Rutherford ton, N. C. . . Rutherford 

Earp, Jessie Fresh. H.S Holly Springs, N. C Wake 

Easom, Alma Senior G Selma, N. C Johnston 

Easom, Lillie O Senior H. S Selma, N. C Johnston 

Eason, Ellie Mae Soph. P Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Eatmon, Margaret Soph. G Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Ebinger, Rollin J Graduate Clermont, Fla 

Edge, Dorothy Junior P Hope Mills, N. C Cumberland 

Edgerton, Nympie Senior H.S Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Edmondson, Mrs. B. J.. .Senior P Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Clarissa B Senior P Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Doris Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Dorothy Fresh. H.S.. . .Chicod, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Gerrard Fresh. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Lina Junior H.S Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Lucille Fresh. P Chicod, N. C Pitt 

Edwards, Pat R Fresh. H.S.. . .Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Edwards, Pearl Junior H.S Chocowinity, N. C Beaufort 

Ellenberg, Anne Junior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Elliott, Frances Junior G Oxford, N. C Granville 



List of Students 181 

Name Class Address County 

Elliott, Sarah Fresh. P Erwin, N. C Harnett 

Elliott, Thelma Senior G Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Ellis, Reid Parker Unclassified. . . Winterville, N. C Pitt 

English, Virginia Junior H.S.. . .Willard, N. C Pender 

Ennett, Margaret Fresh. H.S. . . . Swansboro, N. C Onslow 

Essey, Pauline Soph. H.S Maxton, N. C Robeson 

Etheridge, Evelyn A Fresh. H.S Elizabeth City, N. C. .Pasquotank 

Eure, Adminta Junior P Eure, N. C Gates 

Evans, Annie Kate Soph. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Evans, Eldred Senior H.S.. . .Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Evans, Grace Lee Fresh. G Harrellsville, N. C Hertford 

Evans, Hazel Gray Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Evans, Mavis Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Everette, Delma Faye. . .Junior H.S.. . .Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 
Everett, Harriet Fresh. H.S Palmyra, N. C Martin 

Farlow, Sammie Senior P Carthage, N. C Moore 

Farrior, Rachel Junior H.S.. . .Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Farrior, Ruth M Fresh. H.S Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Felton, Geraldine Fresh. P Colerain, N. C Bertie 

Fentress, Christine Senior H.S. . . .Knotts Island, N. C Currituck 

Ferebee, Alice E Soph. H.S Ernul, N. C Craven 

Ferrell, Alice E Soph. H.S Clayton, N. C Johnston 

Ferrell, Mary H Fresh. H.S. . . . South Hill, Va 

Fields, Damon Fresh. H.S.. . .Seven Springs, N. C Wayne 

Fields, Violet Fresh. P Seven Springs, N. C Wayne 

Finch, Eris Day Soph. H.S Wilson, N. C Nash 

Finley, Margaret Ruth. Junior P Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Fischel, Mamie Lee Fresh. H.S.. . .Vaughan, N. C Warren 

Fisher, Emmett Fresh. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Fisher, Jane Gray Junior H.S. . . . Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Fitzgerald, Marjorie Soph. G Selma, N. C Johnston 

Fitzgerald, Nancy Fresh. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Flanagan, Travis Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Fleming, C. T., Jr Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Fleming, James L Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Fleming, Leah E Junior H.S.. . .Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Fleming, Martha R Junior H.S Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Fleming, Mrs. Mary B.. .Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Fletcher, Ella Nell Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Flow, Morris Fresh. H.S. . . .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Flowers, Doris Fresh. H.S. . . .Calypso, N. C Duplin 

Flowers, Helen Senior H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Floyd, Amy Amanda. . . .Soph. H.S Orrum, N. C Robeson 

Fluck, Anna Unclassified. . .Tarboro, N. C Edgecombe 

Flynn, Helen Louise. . . .Soph. H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Foley, Kate Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Foley, Laura H Senior G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Ford, Evelyn Fresh. G Smithfield, N. C Johnston 

Ford, Mary Long Junior H.S.. . . Franklin ton, N. C Franklin 

Forehand, Clara V Junior P Murfreesboro, N. C. . . . Hertford 

Forehand, Mrs. Louise J. Junior G Colerain, N. C Bertiej 

Forrest, Beatrice Soph. G Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Forrest, Gordon Fresh. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Forrest, Ola Junior H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Fountain, Lila Soph. H.S Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Fowler, Roxie Suit Senior G North Side, N. C Granville 

Fowler, William H Unclassified.. . Sladesville, N. C Hyde 



182 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Foy, Sue Council Senior H.S Pollocksville, N. C Jones 

Frazelle, Z. W.. Soph. H.S Richlands, N. C Onslow 

Freeman, Bernice Fresh. H.S.. . .Hickory, N. C Catawba 

Freeman, Dorothy Fresh. H.S.. . .Colerain, N. C Bertie 

Freeman, Miriam Soph. G Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Fuller, Christine Fresh. H.S.. . .Creedmoor, N. C Granville 

Fussell, Frances H Junior P Morehead City, N. C. . . Carteret 

Futrell, Charles Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Futrell, Margaret Soph. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Gaddy, Florence Senior P Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Gaddy, William Fresh. H.S.. . .Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Gainey, Hazel Senior P Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Gardner, Agnes Fresh. H.S Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Gardner, Lillian White . . Senior P Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Gardner, Marjorie Senior H.S Elm City, N. C Wilson 

Garner, Anne Elizabeth. .Junior H.S Newport, N. C Carteret 

Garner, Dorothy E Junior H.S.. . .Newport, N. C Carteret 

Garner, Floribelle Senior P Newport, N. C Carteret 

Garner, Margaret Graduate Laurinburg, N. C Scotland 

Garner, Ruth B Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Garrett, Anne Elbert Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Garris, Ruby G Senior P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Gary, Muriel Fresh. G Henderson, N. C Vance 

Gaskill, Annie Junior P Hatteras, N. C Dare 

Gaskins, Ann Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt > 

Gaskins, Camille Senior H.S.. . .Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Gaskins, Mary B Junior H.S. . . . New Bern, N. C Craven 

Gaskins, Thurla May. . . . Soph. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Gates, Elizabeth Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Gatling, Margaret Senior G Gates, N. C Gates 

Gatling, Nina Senior H.S Gates, N. C Gates 

Gauldin, Richard O Junior H.S.. . .Ruffin, N. C Rockingham 

Gay, Blanche Elizabeth. .Senior H.S Jackson, N. C Northampton 

Gaylor, Melba Jean Soph. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Gaylord, Rosebud Senior G Roper, N. C Washington 

Gaynor, Lilla V Fresh. H.S.. . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Geddie, Ida Myrtle Senior G Erwin, N. C Harnett 

George, Margaret V Fresh. H.S Comfort, N. C Jones 

Gerock, Margaret Soph. G Maysville, N. C Jones 

Gianakas, James Junior H. S. . . . Hendersonville, N. C. . . Henderson 

Gibbs, Elizabeth Senior G Swan Quarter, N. C... .Hyde 

Gilbert, Margaret M Graduate Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Giles, Lena Rose Fresh. H.S Hickory, N. C Catawba 

Gilliam, Anne Fresh. P Windsor, N. C Bertie 



Gilliam, Ida Mae Jun 

Gillikin, Frances Sen: 

Gillikin, Hilda Sen 

Glover, Edna Earle Sen 

Glover, N. Douglas Sen 

Godley, Maidie Belle Sen 

Goddard, Josephine Jun 

Godwin, Rachel Sen 

Goff , Ruby Sen 

Golden, Agatha Jun 

Goodson/ Gwendolyn. . . .Jun 
Gore, 1 Ruby' Margaret . . .Jun 
Grant, Ruby Sen 



or H.S Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

or H.S. . . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

or P Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

or P Dover, N. C Craven 

or H.S.. . .Wilson, N. C Wilson 

or G Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

or H.S.. . .Rocky Mount, N. C. . .Nash 

or G Tarboro, N. C Edgecombe 

or P Falcon, N. C Cumberland 

H.S.. . .Beaufort, N. C Carteret! 

or P Mebane, N. C Caswell 

for H.S.. . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

or P Greenville, N. C Pitt 



List of Students 183 



Name Class Address County 

Grant, William Junior H.S.. . .Marion, N. C McDowell 

Gray, Jesse Senior H.S. . . . Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Gray, Virginia Fresh. H.S. . . .Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Edgecombe 

Greene, Doris L Junior G Council, N. C Bladen 

Greene, Lois Junior H.S.. . .Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

Greene, Lucy Foard Soph. G Mocksville, N. C Davie 

Greene, Margaret Junior H.S.. . .Clyde, N. C Haywood 

Greene, Sylvia Fresh. H.S.. . .Roduco, N. C Gates 

Greene, William M Junior H.S.. . .Crossnore, N. C Avery 

Gregory, Eugenia Junior P Hertford, N. C Perquimans] 

Gresham, Myrtie R Junior H.S.. . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Gress, Ralph Graduate Lake Landing, N. C Hyde 

Griffin, Agnes Junior H.S.. . .Woodland, N. C Northampton 

Griffin, Aleta Senior H.S.. . . Summerfield, N. C Rockingham 

Griffin, Evan Junior H.S.. . .Williamston, N. C Martin 

Griffin, Grace Junior P Cerro Gordo, N. C Columbus 

Grice, John Glover Fresh. H.S. . . . Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Griffin, Marietta Fresh. H.S.. . .Dover, N. C Craven 

Grussner, Carlotta Senior H.S. . . .Schenectady, N. Y 

Gulledge, Frances Senior H.S. . . . Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Gupton, Dorothy E Senior H.S.. . .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Gupton, Lula F Junior H.S.. . .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Gupton, Olive Marie. . . .Senior H.S. . . .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Gurley, Justine Senior P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Guthrie, Edith Senior P Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Guy, Reta Soph. H.S Angier, N. C Llarnett 

Haislip, Elizabeth Senior P Hamilton, N. C Martin 

Haislip, Nancy Graduate Oak City, N. C Martin 

Hall, Clara C Special Durham, N. C Durham 

Hall, Ruth Jane Junior H.S. . . .Woodsdale, N. C Person 

Hamilton, Edith Vera. . .Senior G Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Hamilton, Vera L Soph. G Sea Level, N. C Carteret 

Hammond, Alma Unclassified. . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Hancock, Mrs. Bessie C. Senior H.S. . . .Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Hancock, Julia Ann Fresh. H.S. . . .New Bern, N. C Craven 

Hardee, Ernestine Special Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Hardee, Jane Patrick Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Harden, Margaret P Soph. H.S Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Hardy, Jane Elizabeth. . . Fresh. P Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Edgecombe 

Hardy, Mary Frances . . . Senior G Maury, N. C Greene 

Hargrove, Frances Soph. H.S Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Harper, Caroline Junior H.S.. . .Tarboro, N. C Edgecombe 

Harrell, S. Elizabeth Senior P Powellsville, N. C Bertl 

Harr: 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 
Harr 



s, Ada Tunnell Junior G Fairfield, N. C Hyde 

s, Mrs. Anne S Senior P Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 

s, Belva Dare Senior H.S. . . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Edith Varina. . . .Senior H.S. . . .Weeksville, N. C Pasquotank 

s, Geraldine Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

s, Hazel B Fresh. H.S.. . .Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

s, J. G Junior H.S.. . .Stovall, N. C Granville 

s, Jean M Junior H.S. . . . Youngsville, N. C Franklin 

s, Julia Soph. H.S Grantsboro, N. C Pamlico 

s, Lucille Senior H.S. . . . Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

s, Mary Lou Senior H.S Elizabeth town, N. C. Bladen 

s, Rosalyn G Soph. P Areola, N. C Warren 

s, Verda M Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

s, William B Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 



184 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Harris, Wilma C Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Harrison, Jane Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hart, Blanche Special Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Hart, Lillian Harris Junior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hart, Marie Senior P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Hastings, Mary Alice Soph. H.S Camden, N. C Camden 

Hastings, Vera Soph. G Camden, N. C Camden 

Hatsell, Elsie Junior H.S.. . .Swansboro, N. C Onslow 

Hayes, Mary H Soph. H.S Fremont, N. C Wayne 

Haynes, Allene Fresh. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Hearne, Laura Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hellen, Christine Soph. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Helma, Beatrice Junior G Monroe, N. C Union 

Henderson, Kenneth L. . .Junior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Herring, Christine Senior H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Herring, Eunice Junior H.S.. . .Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Herring, Iris E Soph. P Watha, N. C Pender 

Herring, Lyda Mae Fresh. G Watha, N. C Pender 

Herring, Mary Elizabeth. Fresh. H.S. . . . Warsaw, N. C Duplin 

Hester, Catherine Fresh. H.S Hurdle Mills, N. C Person 

Hester, Estelle Fresh. P Henderson, N. C Vance 

Hewitt, Miriam Fresh. H.S Elizabeth City, N. C. .Pasquotank 

Hickman, Juliette Senior G Sanford, N. C Lee 

Hill, India Unclassified. . .Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Hilldrup, Keith Fresh. H.S. . . . Chancellor, Va 

Hines, Caroline Junior H.S.. . .Turkey, N. C Sampson 

Hines, Lillian Fresh. H.S New Bern, N. C Craven 

Hinnant, Jacqueline Fresh. G Pine Level, N. C Johnston 

Hinnant, Margaret Soph. H. S Micro, N. C Johnston 

Hinson, Charlotte Soph. P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Hinson, Helen Soph. H.S Walstonburg, N. C Greene 

Hinson, Katherine Graduate Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Hinson, Nancy Special Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Hinton, E. Floyd Senior H.S Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Edgecombe 

Hobgood, Betsy Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hobbs, Eunice Junior P Hobbsville, N. C Gates 

Hockaday, Doris Soph. H.S Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Hodges, Edith Junior H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Hodges, Marie Fresh. G Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Hodges, Norma Junior P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Hodgin, Genevive Fresh. G Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Hoell, Martha Senior H.S Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Hoggard, Miriam E Graduate Lewiston, N. C Bertie 

Holder, Kathryne Junior P Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Holland, Robin Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hollar, Dorothy M Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hollar, Robert Paul Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Holley, Jewell Senior P Leesville, S. C 

Holliday, Mattie L Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hollingsworth, Mary E. . Fresh. H.S La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Holloman, Anne Rice. . . .Soph. G Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Holloman, Louise Fresh. P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Holloman, Virginia E.. . .Junior H.S. . . . Stantonsburg, N. C. . . .Wilson 

Hollowell, Margie L Junior H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Hollowell, Mrs. W. C. . .Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hollowell, W. H Fresh Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Holt, Palmer C Graduate Dudley, N. C Wayne 

Hood, Ruth Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 



List of Students 185 



Name Class Address County 

Hooks, Ophelia Soph. H.S Whiteville, N. C Columbus 

Hoover, Rachel N Senior P Whiteville, N. C Columbus 

Hopson, Violet Junior H.S.. . .Durham, N. C Durham 

Home, Florence E Fresh. H.S. . . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Home, Loraine Junior H.S.. . .Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Home, Mary D Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hornstrom, Harold S. . . . Fresh. H.S. . . . Charlotte, N. C Mecklenburg 

Horton, Rebecca Fresh. P Zebulon, N. C Wake 

House, Helen Loraine. . .Soph. H.S Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

House, Pearl S Junior H.S.. . .Hobgood, N. C Halifax 

Howard, Dallas Senior H.S. . . . Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Howell, Jessie Senior G Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Howell, Lucille Senior G Garysburg, N. C Northampton 

Howell, Sallie V Fresh. P Townsville, N. C Vance 

Hoyle, Mrs. Louise C. . . . Senior G Rockingham, N. C Richmond 

Hoyle, Ransome Fresh. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Hoyle, Ruth A Soph. H.S Henderson, N. C Vance 

Hudson, James E Soph. H.S Thomasville, N. C Davidson 

Hudson, Keith Soph. H.S Thomasville, N. C Davidson 

Hudson, Marguerite Fresh. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Hudson, Ruth Junior P Oxford, N. C Granville 

Huggins, Mrs. Betty R. . .Unclassified. . .Fort Barnwell, N. C Craven 

Humbles, Grace Junior H.S.. . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Humphrey, Clarissa Senior H.S.. . .Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Humphrey, Margaret Senior P St. Pauls, N. C Robeson 

Humphries, Carol L Soph. G Woodsdale, N. C Person 

Hunt, Bessie Fay Junior H.S.. . .Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Hunter, Lillian Fresh. G Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Hunter, Louise Fresh. G Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Hunter, Sarah F Soph. H.S Lexington, N. C Davidson 

Hurff, Emily Ann Senior H.S. . . .Driver, Va 

Huskins, Clonnie Junior H.S. . . .Burnsville, N. C Yancey 

Hutchinson, Elizabeth. . .Senior P Bladenboro, N. C Bladen 

Hyde, William H Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Ipock, Margaret Fresh. G Ernul, N. C Craven 

Ipock, Mattie Senior G Cove City, N. C Craven 

Ives, Elizabeth Fresh. H.S Maribel, N. C Pamlico 

Ives, Joe Robert Fresh. H.S. . . . South Creek, N. C Beaufort 

Jackson, Arthur Soph. H.S Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Jackson, Helen L Fresh. H.S. . . .Plymouth, N. C Washington 

Jackson, Leon Fresh. H.S.. . .Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Jackson, Mrs. Lina Senior P Elizabeth City, N. C. . . Pasquotank 

Jacobs, Zena T Junior P Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

James, Aldace Fresh. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

James, Helen Soph. G Bethel, N. C Pitt 

James, Peggy Nell Soph. H.S Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

Jarvis, Harry Jeffrey. . . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Oxford, N. C Granville 

Jarvis, Rebecca Soph. H.S Engelhard, N. C Hyde 

Jefferson, Helen Brown. .Senior H.S. . . .Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Jefferson, Mary Emma. .Soph. H.S Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Jefferson, Russell Special Pinetown, N. C Beaufort 

Jenkins, Alma Panton. . .Junior P Milwaukee, N. C Northampton 

Jenkins, Bernice Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Jenkins, Catherine Fresh. P Creedmoor, N. C Granville 

Jenkins, Claire Junior H.S.. . .Hobgood, N. C Halifax 

Jenkins, Eleanor D Senior H.S. . . .Aulander, N. C.. . . Bertie 



186 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Jenkins, Elizabeth C Fresh. G Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Jenkins, Elizabeth L Fresh. P Fairmont, N. C Robeson 

Jenkins, Helen M Senior ELS. . . .Milwaukee, N. C Northampton 

Jenkins, Luda Mae Senior H.S. . . .Orrum, N. C Robeson 

Jennings, Edith Fresh Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Jennings, Louise Junior P Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Jernigan, Camille Fresh. H.S.. . .Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Johnson, Alice Senior P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Johnson, Annelle Fresh. H.S. . . .Rocky Point, N. C Pender 

Johnson, Clara Senior P Bonlee, N. C Chatham 

Johnson, Clarine Fresh. H.S. . . . Stedman, N. C Cumberland 

Johnson, Dorothy E Fresh. H.S Scotland Neck, N. C. .Halifax 

Johnson, Emily Senior H.S. . . .Willard, N. C Pender 

Johnson, Erwin M Junior H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Johnson, Ethel Senior H.S. . . .Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Johnson, George H. . . . . . Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Johnson, Gladys Neal. . .Fresh. H.S.. . .Benson, N. C Johnston 

Johnson, Grace Evelyn. .Senior G Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Johnson, Helen Kemp. . .Senior G Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Johnson, Helen Fresh. G Elizabethtown, N. C. . .Bladen 

Johnson, Helen Page. . . .Fresh. H.S.. . .Fairmont, N. C Robeson 

Johnson, Ida Y Soph. H.S Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Johnson, James FI Soph. H.S Fairmont, N. C Robeson 

Johnson, Lina Pearl Junior P Benson, N. C Johnston 

Johnson, Margaret E. . . .Junior H.S.. . .Fairmont, N. C Robeson 

Johnson, Mary T Junior H.S.. . .Stedman, N. C Cumberland 

Johnson, Mrs. Mary. . . .Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Johnson, Mildred Soph. H.S Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Johnson, Miriam Fresh. G Pendleton, N. C Northampton 

Johnson, Norene Senior G Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Johnson, Shirley Senior G Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

Johnson, Sidney Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Johnson, Sue J Fresh. H.S. . . . Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Johnson, Truman Junior H.S.. . .Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Johnson, William S Fresh. H.S.. . .Conway, N. C Northampton 

Johnson, Wincy Fresh. H.S. . . .Angier, N. C Harnett 

Johnston, Mrs. Alma. . . .Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Johnston, Christine Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Johnston, John Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Mrs. Blanche Special Columbia, N. C Tyrrell 

Jones, Carter Senior H.S Winton, N. C Hertford 

Jones, Daisy Raye Senior P Sunbury, N. C Gates 

Jones, Douglas R Junior H.S Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Evelyn Louise. . . .Soph. FI.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Grace C Junior H.S Marshallberg, N. C. . . . Carteret 

Jones, Hazel Dell Soph. P Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Tosie Unclassified. . .Hobgood, N. C Halifax 

Jones, Kathryn Soph. H.S Pink Hill, N. C Lenoir 

Jones, Margaret Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C •. .Pitt 

Jones, Marjorie Dean. . .Junior P Selma, N. C Johnston 

Jones, Naomi Gray Soph. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Norwood Earle. . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Jones, Vivian Fresh. P Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Jordan, Helen D Soph. H.S Bailey, N. C Nash 

Jordan, Mary Soph. G Aurora, N. C Beaufort 

Jordan, Mildred H Fresh. H.S. . . . Elm City, N. C Wilson 

Joyner, Betty Margaret . . Soph. P Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Joyner, J. B Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 



List of Students 187 

Name Class Address County 

Joyner, Jennie Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Justice, Leon Junior H.S. . . .Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Kearney, Geraldine Fresh. P Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Keith, Jessie Senior H.S Kerr, N. C Sampson 

Kelly, Margaret Senior P Carthage, N. C Moore 

Kennedy, Emsley Soph. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Kennedy, Floriedel S. . . .Soph. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Kennedy, Johnnye B.. . .Junior P Beulaville, N. C Duplihf 

Kennedy, Mable Senior G Pink Hill, N. C Duplin 

Keuzenkamp, Barbara. . .Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Keuzenkamp, Betty Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Keuzenkamp, Cornelia. . .Junior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Kilgo, Louise Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Kilpatrick, Evelyn H. . . . Senior H.S Hookerton, N. C Greene 

Kilpatrick, Lucille Senior P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Kilpatrick, Mary E Fresh. P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Kilpatrick, Nancy Fresh. P Hookerton, N. C Greene 

King, Colleen Fresh. H.S. . . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

King, Sarah E Soph. P St._ Pauls, N. C Robeson 

Kirby, Edna Earle Senior G Princeton, N. C Johnston 

Kittrell, Elizabeth Soph. H.S Kittrell, N. C Vance 

Kizer, Franklin D Senior H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Knott, Mae W Junior H.S.. . . Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Knowles, Ida Ruth Senior H.S Roper, N. C Washington 

Knowles, Ruby Graduate Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Knowles, Virginia Soph. H.S Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Knox, Mrs. Eva R Senior P Winnabow, N. C Brunswick 

Koonce, Pearl M Fresh. P Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Kuetemeyer, Vernon. . . .Senior H.S.. . .Chicago Heights, 111.. . . 
Kyzer, Katherine Junior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Lamb, Nannie Senior G Scotland Neck, N. C. . . Halifax 

Lamm, Doris Junior H.S.. . .Lucama, N. C Wilson 

Lancaster, Ruth May. . .Senior P Castalia, N. C Nash 

Lane, Helen Ailene Senior H.S Dover, N. C Craven 

Lane, Madge Junior H.S.. . .Winfall, N. C Perquimans 

Lang, Edna Earle Soph. G Gatesville, N. C Gates 

Langford, Ruby Graduate Blythewood, S. C 

Langley, Jewel Junior H.S.. . .Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Nash 

Langston, Maline Soph. P Gates, N. C Gates 

Lanier, Mildred Fresh. P Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Lanier, Worth Fresh. P Chinquapin, N. C Duplin 

Lassiter, George Fresh. H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Lassiter, Louise Fresh. G Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Latham, Julia Senior H.S.. . .Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Lautares, George Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Lawrence, Harriette Senior H.S. . . .Tarboro, N. C Edgecombe 

Ledford, Sibyl Rhea Fresh. H.S Creswell, N. C Washington 

Lee, Alice Fresh. H.S. . . .Angier, N. C Harnett 

Lee, Audrey Senior G Arapahoe, N. C Pamlico 

Lee, Grace Soph. G Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Lee, Hilda M Junior P Dunn, N. C Harnett 

Lee, Josephine Iris Fresh. P Newton Grove, N. C. .Sampson 

Lee, Ronalda Fresh. H.S.. . .Fuquay Springs, N. C. Harnett 

Leggett, Frances Soph. H.S Hobgood, N. C Halifax 

Lester, William H Fresh. H.S Spring Hope, N. C Franklin 

Lewis, Dorothy. s j Fresh. H.S.. . .Farmville, N. C Pitt 



188 East Carolina Teachees College 



Name Class Address County 

Lewis, Frances Fresh. H.S Knightdale, N. C Wake 

Lewis, J. T Graduate Falkland, N. C Pitt 

Lewis, Margaret Soph. H.S Turkey, N. C Sampson 

Lewis, Myram Elizabeth . Fresh. H.S.. . .Winnabow, N. C Brunswick 

Lewis, Nell Rachel Fresh. H.S Parkton, N. C Robeson 

Lewis, Osborne Soph. H.S Marshallberg, N. C. . . .Carteret 

Lewis, Rebecca Senior H.S. . . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Lewis, Wilma M Soph. P Dublin, N. C Bladen 

Liles, Margaret Soph. H.S Lilesville, N. C Anson 

Lindsay, Mary Louise. . .Junior H.S.. . . Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Lister, Janice Soph. H.S Weeksville, N. C Pasquotank 

Little, James A Soph. H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Little, Mary Lenora Senior H.S. . . . Freeland, N. C Brunswick 

Littrell, Mrs. Mary P.. . .Graduate Rocky Mount, N. C Nash 

Littrell, Robert Graduate Rocky Mount, N. C. . .Nash 

Liverman, Mrs. Geneva. .Graduate Scotland Neck, N. C. . .Halifax 

Liverman, Mildred Senior G Columbia, N. C Tyrrell 

Loftin, Vera Belle Fresh. H.S. . . . Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Lovelace, Nan Junior P Macclesfield, N. C Edgecombe 

Lovelace, Sue Eagles Fresh. H.S.. . .Macclesfield, N. C Edgecombe 

Lucas, Ruby Senior P Speed, N. C Edgecombe 

Lucas, William Soph. H.S Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

Lyday, Inez Senior H.S. . . . Brevard, N. C Transylvania 

Lyon, Evelyn Soph. P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Lyon, Mattie May Graduate Oxford, N. C Granville 

Lyerly, Janie Unclassified. . .Hickory, N. C Catawba 

McClenny, Lottie Senior P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

McCollum, Lucia Mae. . .Senior G Rowland, N. C Robeson 

McCormick, Ann Fresh. P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

McCormick, Elizabeth. . .Senior H.S. . . . Jonesboro, N. C Harnett 

McCormick, Lois Senior H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

McCotter, Lillian Fresh. H.S Alliance, N. C Pamlico 

McCullen, Nell Junior H.S Lakeland, Fla 

McDonald, Eliza E Fresh. H.S.. . .St. Pauls, N. C Bladen 

McDougle, Harold A Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

McGee, Virginia Junior H.S.. . .Monroe, N. C Union 

McGlohon, Loonis Senior H.S Ayden, N. C Pitt 

McGougan, Esther Leah . Fresh. H.S. . . .Tabor City, N. C Columbus 

McGowan, Mavis Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

McHan, Ruth Fresh. P Almond, N. C Swain 

McHenry, Mayo Lee. . . . Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Mclnnis, Sarah Fresh. P Wagram, N. C Scotland 

McKeithan, Eunice Junior H.S Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

McLamb, Alene Soph. H.S Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

McLamb, Malisha Senior G Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

McLauchlin, Helen Senior P Lillington, N. C Harnett 

McLawhon, Vivian Senior H.S Bethel, N. C Pitt 

McLawhorn, Gladys .... Fresh. P Winterville, N. C Pitt 

McLawhorn, Mabel Junior P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

McLawhorn, Reid Junior H.S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

McLawhorn, Richard H. .Unclassified. . .Winterville, N. C Pitt 

McLeod, Lois Fresh. H.S Carthage, N. C Moore 

McMillan, Margaret Fresh. H.S Wade, N. C Cumberland 

McNeill, Mattie Fresh. P Jonesboro, N. C Lee 

Mabry, Anne Bolyn Soph. P Norwood, N. C Stanly 

Maddrey, Ellen Carlton . Soph. H.S Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Maddrey, Lona Eloise. . . Soph. G Seaboard, N. C Northampton 



List of Students 189 



Name Class Address County 

Mahone, Richard D Unclassified... Williamsburg, Virginia. 

Makepeace, Jean Junior H.S.. . .Sanford, N. C Lee 

Mallard, Bertha O Fresh. H.S.. . .Trenton, N. C Jones 

Mallard, Walter W Junior H.S Trenton, N. C Jones 

Maness, Albert M Senior H.S Chadbourn, N. C Columbus 

Mann, Clyde R. . Fresh. H.S. . . . Manteo, N. C Dare 

Manning, Christine Fresh. P Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Manning, Jennie L Unclassified . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Manning, Mildred P Graduate Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Mansour, Martha Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Marks, Charles L Senior H.S. . . . Whitakers, N. C Edgecombe 

Marlowe, Mamie Soph. H.S Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Marriott, Donald E Fresh. H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Marshburn, Eugenia Fresh. H.S Rocky Mount, N. C . .Nash 

Marshburn, Frances Fresh. H.S. . . . Benson, N. C Johnston 

Marshburn, Harriet A. . . Senior G Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Marshburn, Laurene .... Fresh. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Martin, Audrey Senior P Mount Olive, N. C Wayne 

Martin, B. F Senior H.S. . . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Martin, Bobby Lou Fresh. H.S Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Martin, Elizabeth Senior G Charlotte, N. C Mecklenburg 

Martin, Franklin E Fresh. H.S Conway, N. C Northampton 

Martin, Hilda Ruth Junior H.S Conway, N. C Northampton 

Martin, Robert D Fresh. H.S Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Massengill, Myrtle G Soph. G Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Massey, Dorothine Junior P Pleasant Hill, N. C. . . . Northampton 

Massey, Helen Junior G Pleasant Hill, N. C. . .Northampton 

Mason, Lura Junior G Atlantic, N. C Carteret 

Matheson, Nell Senior G Mount Gilead, N. C Montgomery 

Matthews, Edith E Senior H.S. . . . Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Matthews, Elizabeth. . . .Senior H.S.. . . Murfreesboro, N. C. . . .Hertford 

Matthews, Hazel Unclassified . . . Kipling, N. C Harnett 

Matthews, Savonne Senior H.S.. . .Kipling, N. C Harnett 

Matthis, Emma Doris. . .Unclassified. . .Turkey, N. C Sampson 

Maultsby, Anna E Senior P Whiteville, N. C Columbus 

Maxwell, Mildred Fay. . .Junior P Brevard, N. C Transylvania 

May, Lydia Hill Senior H.S Spring Hope, N. C Nash 

Mayes, Wally Cobb Fresh. P Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Mayo, Bruce R Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Mayo, Daisy King Junior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Mayo, Hiram Soph. H.S Mesic, N. C Pamlico 

Mayo, Loreen Senior H.S Aurora, N. C Beaufort 

Mayo, Norman Senior H.S Plymouth, N. C Washington 

Mayo, Olive Senior P Falkland, N. C. Pitt 

Meadows, Leon, Jr. Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Meads, Lucy Pattie Special Elizabeth City, N. C. .Pasquotank 

Medlin, Zeleiama Junior H.S Bunn, N. C Franklin 

Meiggs, Elizabeth Senior H.S Camden, N. C Camden 

Meiggs, Nora Soph. P Camden, N. C Camden 

Mercer, Arline Junior P Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Mercer, Elizabeth Senior G Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Mercer, Winifred Junior H.S Wilson, N. C Nash 

Merritt, Elizabeth Senior G Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Messick, Rita S Fresh. H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Mewborn, Ailine Junior H.S Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Mewborn, Manora Fresh. H.S Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Midgett, L. Evelyn Senior G Rodanthe, N. C Dare 

Miles, Caroline Junior P Henderson, N. C. ; . . . .Vance 



190 East Carolina Teachbes College 



Name Class Address County 

Miller, Ben Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Miller, Bob Fresh. H.S Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

Milligan, Patricia Senior P Summit, N. J 

Mishoe, Helen Y Soph. H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Mitchell, Alice Soph. G Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Mitchell, Edna Lenora . . . Senior H.S. . . . Hobbsville, N. C Gates 

Mitchell, Erline Senior P Bunn, N. C Franklin 

Mitchell, Evelyn Senior H.S. . . . Kittrell, N. C Franklin 

Mitchell, Mildred Junior G Trotville, N. C Gates 

Mitchell, Pauline Senior H.S. . . .Trotville, N. C Gates 

Mizelle, Clellie Soph. G Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Mizelle, Louise E Senior G Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Mizelle, Merrimond Fresh. H.S. . . .Bethel, N. C Pitt _ 

Moffett, Jacqueline Soph. H.S Madison, N. C Rockingham 

Montague, Rowena Fresh. H.S Oxford, N. C Granville 

Moore, Anna J Soph. H.S Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Moore, Mrs. A. L Senior G Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Moore, Doris Fresh. G Spring Hope, N. C Franklin 

Moore, Gertrude Graduate Chocowinity, N. C Beaufort 

Moore, Lorraine Soph. P Falkland, N. C Pitt 

Moore, Mary Sue Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Moore, Maude Senior P Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Moore, Mona Edith Senior H.S Delco, N. C Columbus 

Moore, Nellie G Unclassified. . .Delco, N. C Columbus 

Morgan, Alice E Soph. P Lillington, N. C Harnett 

Morris, Anne Lois Fresh. H.S La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Morris, Blannie Rea Senior G Sunbury, N. C Gates 

Morris, Goldie M Soph. G Jackson, N. C Northampton 

Morris, Marian Florine. .Fresh. H.S Atlantic, N. C Carteret 

Morris, Mary Junior H.S Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Morton, Katherine Fresh. H.S Kinston, N.C Lenoir 

Morton, Orvil Junior H.S Chicago Heights, 111.. . . 

Moss, Sarah Anne Fresh. P Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Moye, Rebecca Junior G Bunn, N. C Franklin 

Mozingo, Helen Junior H.S Selma, N. C Johnston 

Mumfbrd, Ann Junior P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Mumford, Gladys Soph. H.S Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Murphy, Emily Senior H.S Atkinson, N. C Pender 

Murphy, Nell F Fresh. H.S. . . .Henderson, N. C Vance 

Myers, Dolly Senior H.S Hamilton, N. C Martin 

Myers, Garnette Senior G Henderson, N. C Vance 

Myers, Lorraine Senior H.S Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Myers, Margaret Fresh. H.S.. . .Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Nakoneczny, Annie Soph. H.S Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Neikind, Alfred Junior H.S Bridgeport, Conn 

Nelms, Lucille Soph. G Oxford, N. C Granville 

Nelson, Charles L Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Newby, Frances E Soph. H.S Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

Newman, Zula Junior H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Newsome, Madie Junior P Harrellsville, N. C Hertford 

Noble, G. N Graduate Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Nobles, Lucy Junior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Nobles, W. Lon, Jr Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Noe, Elizabeth Senior H.S.. . .Bath, N. C Beaufort 

Noe, Thomas D Fresh. H.S Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Norwood, Elizabeth S Fresh. H.S Virgilina, Virginia 



List of Students 191 

Name Class Address County 

Nowarah, Ruth Senior H.S. . . .Roper, N. C Washington 

Nurnberger, Margaret L. Junior P Richmond, Virginia. . . . 

Oakley, Doris Fresh. H.S. . . . Rougemont, N. C Person 

Oden, Melba Gray Soph. G Hatteras, N. C Dare 

Oden, Ruby Ross Soph. P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Odum, Blonnie Soph. P Swansboro, N. C Onslow 

Ogburn, Doris G Fresh. H.S.. . .Willow Springs, N. C. . .Johnston 

Ogburn, Pearl Fresh. H.S. . . .Willow Springs, N. C. . .Wake 

Oglesby, Carolyn Fresh. H.S. . . .Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Oldham, Margaret E. . . . Senior G Holly Springs, N. C . .Wake 

Orr, Jewell Fresh. H.S. . . .Willard, N. C Pender 

Osborne, Elizabeth Fresh. G Dillsboro, N. C Jackson 

Osteen, Marion V Special Anderson, S. C 

Overton, Maude L Fresh. P Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Owen, Louise Senior P Council, N. C Bladen 

Owens, Dave Soph. H.S Pinetops, N. C Edgecombe 

Owens, Eloise G Soph. H.S Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Owens, Jean M Soph. H.S Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Owens, Mildred T Soph. P Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Ownley, Myrtle F Senior G Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Page, Elizabeth Junior P Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Page, Jessie Mae Junior G Cameron, N. C Moore 

Park, Louise Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Parker, Alvany Senior G Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Nash 

Parker, Arleen Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Parker, Essie Unclassified. . .Manly, N. C Moore 

Parker, Esther Mae Junior H.S.. . .George, N. C Northampton 

Parker, Ethelene Junior P Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Parker, Gertrude Senior P Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Parker, Glennie E Fresh. H.S. . . .Silverdale, N. C Onslow 

Parker, Kate Bryan Senior H.S. . . .Verona, N. C Onslow 

Parker, Lillie M Fresh. P Potecasi, N. C Northampton 

Parker, Mary John Junior H.S.. . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Parker, Sue Soph. H.S Pollocksville, N. C Jones 

Parkinson, Mrs. Helen. . . Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Parnell, Cassie Soph. P Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Parnell, Edna Fresh. H.S.. . .Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Parnell, Joye Junior H.S. . . . Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Parrish, Gretchen Soph. P Clayton, N. C Johnston 

Parrish, Warren C Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Parrott, Martha Senior H.S. . . .Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Partin, Elizabeth S Senior P Littleton, N. C Halifax 

Pate, Mildred Senior P New Bern, N. C Craven 

Patrick, Mrs. Archie H. . . Junior P Englehard, N. C Hyde 

Patrick, Edward G Fresh. H.S. . . . Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Patrick, Miriam Senior H.S Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Patterson, Mrs. Frances . Graduate Leaksville, N. C Rockingham 

Paul, Tillie W Fresh. H.S. . . . Chocowinity, N. C Beaufort 

Peacock, Helen Junior P Parkton, N. C Robeson 

Peal, Elizabeth Junior H.S Creswell, N. C Washington 

Pearce, Eloise Senior G Timberlake, N. C Person 

Pearsall, Dorothy Soph. P Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Pearsall, Elizabeth Senior H.S.. . .Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Pearson, Zula Fresh. G Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Pecora, Rosa Senior H.S Bowden, N. C Duplin 

Peeden, Rosa Lee Fresh. H.S.. . .Willow Springs, N. C. . .Wake 



192 East Carolina Teachers College 



Name Class Address County 

Peek, Dorothy M Fresh. H.S Lewiston, N. C Bertie 

Pegram, Dorothy Mae. . . Senior P Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Penuel, Ellen Marie Junior H.S.. . .Princeton, N. C Wayne 

Peoples, Faye Junior H.S.. . .Mocksville, N. C Davie 

Perkins, Jean Unclassified. . .Stokes, N. C Pitt 

Perry, Annie Sue Soph. H.S Merry Hill, N. C Bertie 

Perry, Donald L Soph. H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Perry, Kirk Junior P Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Perry, Lou Ellen Graduate Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

Perry, Rebecca Anne. . . .Soph. G Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Peterson, Howard A Special Washington, D. C 

Peterson, Rachel Soph. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Phelps, Frances R Soph. H.S Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Phillips, Janie Reid Senior P Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Phillips, Mary Elizabeth . Senior G Fountain, N. C Pitt 

Phillips, Matt Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Pierce, Edna Senior G Apex, N. C Wake 

Pierce, Ellen M Junior P Sunbury, N. C Gates 

Pierce, Vernelle B Junior G Colerain, N. C Bertie 

Piner, Annie M Soph. P Marshallberg, N. C. . . . Carteret 

Pitts, Mary Dale Junior P Creedmoor, N. C Granville 

Pleasant, Christine Soph. H.S Angier, N. C Johnston 

Pollard, Martha E Senior P Bellarthur, N. C Pitt 

Pollard, Ruth Y Graduate Garner, N. C Wake 

Pollock, Margaret Junior H.S.. . .Trenton, N. C Jones 

Pollock, Maybelle Senior H.S Pollocksville, N. C Jones 

Pollock, Minnie Carol. . .Senior G Trenton, N; C Jones 

Polow, Leonard L Fresh. H.S Charlotte, N. C Mecklenburg 

Poole, Mary Ethel Soph. H.S Richlands, N. C Onslow 

Pope, Retha Fresh. G Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Porter, Mary Jewell Soph. G Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Poteat, Dorothy Senior H.S Marion, N. C McDowell 

Potter, Daphne Senior P Kelly, N. C Bladen 

Potter, Sarah Junior P Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

Powell, Aulene Junior H.S.. . .Denton, N. C Davidson 

Powell, Dorothy Senior H.S.. . .Warsaw, N. C Duplin 

Powell, Edith , Senior P Franklinton, N. C Franklin 

Powell, Edna Soph. H.S Smithfield, N. C Johnston 

Powell, Edna Louise Soph. P Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Powell, Jean L Junior H.S.. . .Kerr, N. C Sampson 

Poythress, Anne Junior P Henderson, N. C Vance 

Price, May Senior G Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Price, Myrtle C Fresh. H.S. . . .Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Price, Nettie Pearl Senior G Wendell, N. C Wake 

Price, Ovelia Junior H.S.. . .Selma, N. C Johnston 

Price, Sara Soph. H.S Pineville, N. C Mecklenburg 

Pridgen, Rebecca Fresh. H.S.. . .Elm City, N. C Nash 

Pritchard, Elizabeth .... Senior G Aulander, N. C Bertie 

Pritchard, Minnie L Junior H.S Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Pritchett, Mrs. Hilda C. Senior G Creswell, N. C Tyrrell 

Privette, Lucille Senior H.S. . . .Spring Hope, N. C Nash 

Privott, Frances Senior G Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Privott, Marjorie Fresh. H.S.. . .Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Privott, Mary Senior G Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Pryor, Frances Odessa. . .Soph. H.S Ruffin, N. C Rockingham 



List of Students 193 



Name Class Address County 

Queen, Lois L Fresh. H.S.. . .Cherokee, N. C Swain 

Quinn, Maxine Fresh. G Seven Springs, N. C Duplin 

Quinn, Minnie L Junior G Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Ratcliff, Frances Junior H.S.. . .Pantego, N. C Beaufort 

Rawls, Elsie Junior G Alliance, N. C Pamlico 

Ray, Henrietta E Junior H.S.. . .Buckner, N. C Madison 

Rea, James Latham Unclassified. . .Wenona, N. C Washington 

Read, Jane Fresh. H.S. . . .Plymouth, N. C Washington 

Reade, Adelaide Junior G Burgaw, N. C Pender 

Reaves, Mary Alice Fresh. H.S. . . .Warsaw, N. C Duplin 

Reed, Margaret Junior P Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

Reese, Daphne Adele .... Senior G Greensboro, N. C Guilford 

Register, Elizabeth Fresh. H.S. . . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Register, Helen Soph. P Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Register, Lucy Soph. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Register, Viola Soph. G Dover, N. C Craven 

Reynolds, Beatrice Junior H.S.. . .Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Reynolds, Mrs. Charles . .Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Rhodes, Irma Junior H.S.. . .Whiteville, N. C Columbus 

Rice, Martha B Senior H.S. . . . Enfield, N. C Halifax 

Ricks, Esther Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Riddick, Betsy Anne. . . .Junior H.S.. . .Gates, N. C Gates 

Riddick, Ellen Fresh. H.S.. . .Hobbsville, N. C Gates 

Riddick, Harry S Senior H.S. . . .Gatesville, N. C Gates 

Riddle, Virginia Senior P Saint Pauls, N. C Cumberland 

Ridenhour, Eunice Fresh. H.S.. . .La Grange, N. *C Greene 

Ridenhour, Lester Graduate Cooleemee, N. C Davie 

Ritter, Thelma G. Soph. P Hemp, N. C Moore 

Rivenbark, Maggie P.. . .Junior P Wallace, N. C Duplin 

Roach, Ruth Soph. H.S New Bern, N. C Pamlico 

Roberson, Grace Soph. P Robersonville, N. C. . . .Martin 

Roberson, Howard Senior H.S. . . .Candler, N. C Buncombe 

Roberson, Nancy Ann. . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Washington, D. C 

Roberts, Arnie B Junior P Macon, N. C Warren 

Roberts, Doris Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Roberts, Doris Senior H.S. . . .Shawboro, N. C Currituck 

Roberts, Frances Soph. H.S Yanceyville, N. C Caswell 

Roberts, James Earl. . . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Milwaukee, N. C Northampton 

Roberts, Mary Elizabeth Soph. H.S Willow Springs, N. C. . .Johnston 

Roberts, Virginia Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Robertson, Florence P. . .Junior H.S.. . .Colerain, N. C Bertie 

Robertson, Frances Junior H.S.. . .Portsmouth, Virginia. . . 

Robertson, Maribelle Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Robeson, Mrs. Anne G. . . Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Robinson, Laura Ann. . .Senior G Atlantic, N. C Carteret 

Robinson, Nyda Senior P Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Roebuck, Frances Senior H.S. . . .Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Rogers, Mozelle Junior G Wake Forest, N. C Wake 

Rogerson, Russell Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Rollins, Betsy K Soph. H.S Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Nash 

Rooks, Blanche L Soph. G Watha, N. C Pender 

Roper, Randolph Junior H.S.. . .Bath, N. C Beaufort 

Ross, Grace Junior P Aurora, N. C Beaufort 

Ross, Mrs. Hugh H Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Ross, Leah Mildred Fresh. G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Rose, Mrs. J. H Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Rouse, Alma Soph. G Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

13 



194 East Carolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Rouse, Cathryn Soph. P Magnolia, N. C Duplin 

Rouse, Egbert Soph. G Grifton, N. C Lenoir 

Rouse, Virginia Soph. G Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Rowell, Alice Fresh. H.S Garysburg, N. C Northampton 

Royall, Wilda Senior H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Rubin, Spencer M Soph. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Ruffin, Mary H Senior H.S.. . .Wilson, N. C Wilson 

Rush, Juanita Senior H.S. . . . Clyde, N. C Haywood 

Russell, Katherine Soph. H.S Biscoe, N. C Montgomery 

Russell, Margaret Soph. H.S Richlands, N. C Onslow 

Safley, Ruby Fresh. H.S Cooleemee, N. C Davie 

Safrit, Betty Jane Junior H.S.. . .Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

Saied, Louise Junior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Saint-Amand, Ray Senior G Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Sanderson, Reba Grace. .Fresh. P Pink Hill, N. C Duplin 

Sandlin, Julia D Junior P Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Sasser, Dorothy Mae. . . .Soph. G Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Sasser, Leona F Fresh. G Selma, N. C Johnston 

Sasser, Mary Lee Soph. H.S Selma, N. C Johnston 

Satterfield, Evelyn Senior P Roxboro, N. C Person 

Satterwhite, Doris Senior G Oxford, N. C Granville 

Saunders, Wilma Fresh. H.S. . . .Apex, N. C Wake 

Savage, Mrs. Ada B. J.. .Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Savage, Shirley Fresh. G Willard, N. C Pender 

Sawyer, Marguerite Soph. H.S Spot, N. C Currituck 

Sawyer, Maude Senior H.S. . . .Belcross, N. C Camden 

Scales, Emmy Lou Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Schroy, Christine Senior H.S. . . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Schuerholz, Wilson Special Baltimore, Md 

Scott, Emma Fresh. P Warsaw, N. C Duplin 

Scott, Paul A., Jr Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Scoville, Jane Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Scull, Gladys Senior G Raeford, N. C Hoke 

Seago, Clara Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Sears, Frances Junior H.S.. . .Apex, N. C Wake 

Seegars, Virginia D Senior G Fairfield, N. C Hyde 

Selby, Barbara Fresh. H.S.. . .Dudley, N. C Wayne 

Sellers, Mrs. Annie A Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Sermons, Frances Unclassified. . .Fort Barnwell, N. C Craven 

Sessoms, Lois D Soph. P Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Sewell, Agatha Fresh. H.S. . . . Verona, N. C Onslow 

Sexton, Elizabeth Soph. P Zebulon, N. C Wake 

Sexton, Miriam Junior P Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Nash 

Shaw, Edna K Fresh. G Atkinson, N. C Pender 

Shaw, Mary Ellen Junior P Mebane, N. C Alamance 

Shearin, Charlotte Junior G Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Nash 

Shearin, Dorothy P Soph. H.S Littleton, N. C Warren 

Shearon, Annie Laurie. . .Fresh. P Bunn, N. C Franklin 

Shearon, Margaret L. . . . Senior H.S. . . . Bunn, N. C Franklin 

Sheffield, Mary Beth .... Fresh. H.S. . . . Rose Hill, N. C Duplin 

Shelton, Thomas Fresh. H.S. . . . Yanceyville, N. C Caswell 

Shelton, William L Fresh. H.S.. . .Ahoskie, N. C Hertford 

Shepherd, J. C Soph. H.S Lexington, N. C Davidson 

Shine, Genevieve Fresh. H.S. . . .Arapahoe, N. C Pamlico 

Shine, Mary Lee Unclassified. . .Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Edgecombe 

Shirley, Bonnie Bell Fresh. H.S. . . . Grifton, N. C Pitt 

Shuff, Phyllis Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 



List of Students 



195 



Name Class 

Shuffler, Mrs. Lucille K... Graduate.. 

Shumaker, Elizabeth Fresh. H.S. 

Simmons, Alma Fresh. H.S. 

Simmons, Inez Fresh. H.S. 

Simmons, Metsel K Junior H.S. 

Simon, Annie C Fresh. H.S. 

Sizemore, Lucille Unclassified 

Slate, Mary E Fresh. H.S. 

Slater, Jewel M Fresh. H.S. 

Slater, Merle Soph. H.S.. 

Smith, Alice R Junior H.S. 

Smith, Bonnie Soph. H.S.. 

Smith, Carley B Soph. H.S.. 

Smith, Mrs. Clyde H Special 

Smith, Dorothy Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Edna Earle Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Mrs. Estelle B Graduate. . 

Smith, Ethel Elizabeth. .Fresh. G... 

Smith, Eunice Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Evelyn Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Frances Soph. H.S.. 

Smith, Jake Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Lena Mae Junior H.S. 

Smith, Lizzie C Junior H.S. 

Smith, Lois Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Lucile E Fresh. H.S. 

Smith, Lucy C Junior P.. . 

Smith, Lucy N Fresh. P. . . 

Smith, Marie A Senior P. 

Smith, Marion L Senior H.S 

Smith, Marjorie Fresh. H.S 

Smith, Maude E Senior P.. . 

Smith, Nannie Unclassified 

Smith, Nina Elizabeth. . .Senior H.S. 

Smith, Pecolia F Senior H.S. 

Smith, Ruby Soph. P.... 

Smith, Ruth Fresh. H.S. 

Snell, Gladys Fresh. G.. . 

Sorrell, Helen Senior H.S. 

Southerland, Azalene Senior H.S. 

Southerland, Eleanor Senior H.S. 

Southerland, Ellen Senior H.S. 

Southerland, Frances B.. Senior P.. . 

Spangler, Mildred Senior H.S. 

Sparks, Louise Fresh. P. . . 

Spear, Fenly Soph. H.S.. 

Spear, Roxie Senior G.. . 

Spence, Dorothy H Senior G.. . 

Spence, Martha Soph. G. . . 

Spencer, Ruth M Soph. H.S.. 

Spencer, Virginia P Senior H.S. 

Spivey, Margie Senior P.. . 

Spruill, Betty L Junior H.S. 

Stacey, Elizabeth Senior H.S. 

Stallings, Eris Soph. H.S.. 

Stallings, Mrs. Lola L Junior G.. . 

Stallings, Marian Soph. H.S.. 

Stallings, Ruth Soph. H.S.. 



Address County 

. . Wilmington, r N. C New Hanover 

..Raleigh, N.C Wake 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

..Fairfield, N.C Hyde 

. .Columbia, N. C Tyrrell 

. .Pinetops, N. C Edgecombe 

. .Clarksville, Va 

. .Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 

..Greenville, N.C Pitt 

..Greenville, N.C Pitt 

. . Fairmont, N. C Robeson 

. .Varina, N. C Harnett 

..Ransomville, N. C Beaufort 

..Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

. .Robersonville, N. C Martin 

. .Washington, N. C Beaufort 

. .Robersonville, N. C Martin 

..Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Chocowinity, N. C Beaufort 

..Ayden, N. C Pitt 

. .Winterville, N. C Pitt 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

. .Winterville, N. C Pitt 

. .Benson, N. C Johnston 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Lemon Springs, N. C.Lee 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Elizabeth City, N. C. . . Pasquotank 

..Fountain, N.C Pitt 

..Fountain, N.C Pitt 

..Farmville, N. C Pitt 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Saint Pauls, N. C Robeson 

. .Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

. .Godwin, N. C Cumberland 

. .Columbia, N. C Tyrrell 

. .Hubert, N. C Onslow 

. .Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

. .Kenansville, N. C Duplin 

. . Kenansville, N.C Duplin 

. .Burgaw, N. C Pender 

. .Danville, Va 

. .Ruffin, N. C Rockingham 

. .Chapel Hill, N. C Orange 

. .Creswell, N. C Washington 

. .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

. .Fuquay Springs, N. C.Wake 

..Washington, N. C Beaufort 

. .Swan Quarter, N. C. . .Hyde 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

. .Rutherfordton, N. C. .Rutherford 

. Jamesville, N. C Martin 

. .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

. Jamesville, N. C Martin 

. .HobbsviUe, N. C Gates 



196 East Carolina Teaohebs College 

Name Class Address County 

Stancill, Mrs. L. L Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stanley, Audrey Senior P Swansboro, N. C Onslow- 
Stanley, Elizabeth S Senior P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Stanley, Mildred Senior G Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Stanton, Sarah Fresh. H.S Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Starling, Dorothy Junior P Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Starling, Lyle Reid Soph. P Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Staton, Eleanor W Fresh. H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Staton, Flora M Senior P New London, N. C Stanly 

Staton, Joe Senior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stephenson, Inez Junior H.S Angier, N. C Harnett 

Stephenson, Lillian Fresh. H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C Wake 

Stevens, Mary Ann Fresh. H.S Smithfield, N. C Johnston 

Stevenson, Annie A Soph. H.S Palmyra, N. C Halifax 

Stewart, Ellen Junior G Broadway, N. C Harnett 

Stewart, Evelyn B Junior P Fairfield, N. C Hyde 

Stewart, Nancy Fresh. G Cedar Grove, N. C Orange 

Stewart, Panthea Fresh. H.S Warrenton, N. C Warren 

Stewart, Thelma Junior H.S Lillington, N. C Harnett 

Stocks, Vera Dare Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stokes, Betty Jo Soph. H.S.. . ..Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stokes, Dorothy Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stokes, Margaret Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stokes, Rosa Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Stokes, Winifred Soph. G Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Stone, Helen M Soph. G Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 

Stovall, Alice Soph. H.S Stovall, N. C Granville 

Strickland, Annie S Fresh. H.S.. . .Middlesex, N. C Nash 

Strickland, Delia Soph. H.S Middlesex, N. C Nash 

Strickland, Hulda Senior H.S Spring Hope, N. C Franklin 

Strickland, Jean C Soph. G Fayetteville, N. C Cumberland 

Strickland, Laura Senior H.S Middlesex, N. C Nash 

Strickland, Sam B Fresh. H.S Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Strickland, Susie Soph. P Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Stroud, Martha Sue Senior P Seven Springs, N. C Duplin 

Sturdivant, Gladys Senior H.S Clayton, N. C Wake 

Sugg, Elizabeth Unclassified ... Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Sugg, Marjorie Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Sumrell, Hilda L Junior G Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Sumrell, Mrs. Mary E.B. Graduate Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Sutherland, Frances Senior H.S Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Sutton, Elsie F Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Sutton, Helen Reid Special Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Sutton, Sadie R Fresh. H.S La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Swain, Mary Katherine. .Fresh. P Williamston, N. C Martin 

Swindell, Camille Graduate Fairfield, N. C Hyde 

Tadlock, Myrtle Fresh. H.S.. . .Windsor, N. C Bertie 

Tarkenton, Nellie Senior G Mackeys, N. C Washington 

Tart, Margaret Senior H.S Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Taylor, Frances A Senior P Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Geraldine Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Grace Junior H.S Pink Hill, N. C Lenoir 

Taylor, Helen Senior H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Helen Louise Senior H.S Maple, N. C Currituck 

Taylor, James V Fresh. H.S. . . . Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Lorraine Junior H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Taylor, M. Grace Fresh. G Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 



List of Students 197 

Name Class Address County 

Taylor, Olive K Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Pauline Fresh. H.S.. . .Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Taylor, Sally B Junior H.S.. . .Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Taylor, Sibyl Senior H.S.. . .Seaboard, N. C Northampton 

Taylor, V. Frankie Fresh. H.S Mebane, N. C Alamance 

Teague, Marshall Unclassified. . .Brevard, N. C Transylvania 

Teal, Patsy B Soph. P Wadesboro, N. C Anson 

Tew, Estaline Senior G Godwin, N. C Sampson 

Thew, Catherine ,. . Senior G Marion, Ohio 

Thigpen, John Junior H.S Williamston, N. C Martin 

Thomas, Charles Hubert Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Thomas, Elizabeth Special Cameron, N. C .Moore 

Thomas, Helen N Fresh. H.S. . . .Corinth, N. C Chatham 

Thomas, Lorraine E Fresh. H.S.. . .Red Springs, N. C Robeson 

Thomas, Louise Junior H.S Oakboro, N. C Stanly 

Thomas, Sue M Soph. P Beaufort, N. C Carteret 

Thomasson, Elizabeth. . .Senior H.S.. . .South Hill, Va 

Thompson, Helen Fresh. H.S.. . .Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Thompson, James Soph. H.S Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Thompson, Mrs. J. B Special Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Thompson, Jessie Senior H.S.. . .Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Thompson, Sarah Junior H.S. . . .Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Thompson, Willie W Senior P La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Tillery, Ila Junior H.S.. . .Marshall, N. C Madison 

Timberlake, Susan A. . . . Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Tomlinson, Eileen Senior H.S. . . .Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Tomlinson, Janet Soph Black Creek, N. C Wilson 

Townsend, Ida Senior G Fair Bluff, N. C Columbus 

Tripp, Charley, Jr Fresh. H.S.. . .Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Tripp, Thomas S Soph. H.S Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Trott, Irene Fresh. H.S Richlands, N. C Onslow 

Truckner, Milton Unclassified . . . Peletier, N. C Carteret 

Tucker, Annie Ruth Junior H.S.. . .Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Tucker, Marie Junior H.S.. . .Peachland, N. C Anson 

Tucker, Max Lee Fresh. H.S.. . .Chicod, N. C Pitt 

Tucker, Ruth M Junior G Townsville, N. C Vance 

Tucker, Sara E Fresh. H.S.. . .Townsville, N. C Vance 

Tucker, Walter Senior H.S. . . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Tull, Rowena Junior P Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Tunstall, Frances B Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Turnage, B. B Unclassified ... Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Turnage, Hazel H Senior P Pollocksville, N. C Jones 

Turnage, Loys Senior P Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Turnage, Margaret E Fresh. H.S Bath, N. C Beaufort 

Turnbull, Lois H Unclassified. . .Trenton, N. C Jones 

Turner, Hattie Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Twiford, Edith Soph. H.S Elizabeth City, N. C. .Pasquotank 

Tyndall, Lorraine Fresh. H.S. . . .Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Tyndall, Ruby W Soph. P Pink Hill, N. C Lenoir 

Tyson, Barbara Soph. H.S Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Tyson, Betty. Fresh. H.S. . . . Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Tyson, Catherine Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Underwood, Rosemary. .Senior H.S.. . .Saint Pauls, N. C Bladen 

Upchurch, Hilda Rose. . .Senior G Lillington, N. C Harnett 

Usry, Bess Junior H.S Oxford, N. C Granville 

Ussery, Geraldine Fresh. H.S. . . . Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Uzzle, Virginia Senior P Wilson's Mills, N. C. . . .Johnston 



198 East Carolina Teachebs College 



Name Class Address County 

Vail, Margaret M Junior:H.S Pikeville, N. C Wayne 

Vann, Jane U Soph.. H.S Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Vaughan, Irene Junior H.S.. . .Rich Square, N. C Northampton 

Vause, B. Allene Fresh. H.S. . . .La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Vause, Irma L Graduate Rocky Mount, N. C. . . . Nash 

Venters, Rockfellow Senior H.S. . . .Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Vincent, Clarence Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Vinson, Ernestine Louise. Soph. G Woodland, N. C Northampton 

VonGlohn, Katherine Graduate Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Waddell, J. Dan Senior H.S. . . . Hendersonville, N. C .Henderson 

Wade, R. Elizabeth Senior H.S. . . .Williston, N. C Carteret 

Wagner, Maywood Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Wahl. Frances Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Walker, Edith Fresh. H.S.. . .Roxboro, N. C. Person 

Walker, Frances E Fresh. G Winston-Salem, N. C. . . Forsyth 

Walker, Iris Junior H.S.. . .Hillsboro, N. C Orange 

Walker, Kenneth Senior H.S. . . . Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Walker, Laura M Fresh. G Coinjock, N. C Currituck 

Wallace, Katherine Senior P Weldon, N. C Halifax 

Wallace, Mary L Junior H.S.. . . Belhaven, N. C Beaufort 

Walters, Ingram Junior H.S.. . .Bladenboro, N. C Columbus 

Walton, Lissie Senior P Jacksonville, N. C Onslow 

Ward, Annie Mae Soph. P Whitakers, N. C Nash 

Ward, Mrs. Lena B Senior P Cove City, N. C Craven 

Ward, Mattie L Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Ward, Myrtle Junior G Edenton, N. C Chowan 

Ward, Virgil Junior H.S.. . . Williamston, N. C Martin 

Warren, Annie R Fresh. H.S. . . . Newton Grove, N. C. . . Sampson 

Warren, Evelyn Fresh. P Newton Grove, N. C. . . Sampson 

Warren, Lucy Junior H.S.. . .Mebane, N. C Caswell 

Warren, Martha M Senior G Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Warren, Virginia Fresh. G Roxboro, N. C Person 

Warren, Willie H Fresh. P Newton Grove, N. C; . . Sampson 

Waters, N. B Unclassified. . .Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Watkins, Mildred Junior H.S.. . .Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Watkins, Sarah Junior G Rockingham, N. C Richmond. 

Watson, David Senior H.S. . . . Southport, N. C Brunswick 

Watson, Freeman Soph. H.S Albemarle, N. C Stanly 

Watson, Joyce Fresh. H.S. . . . Morganton, N. C Burke 

Watson, Mabel S Soph. G Fremont, N. C Wayne 

Watts, Lallah B Senior H.S. . . . Raleigh, N. C Wake < 

Weathers, Ida Mae Fresh. H.S.. . . Youngsville, N. C Franklin 

Webb, Marjorie Junior P Pinetops, N. C Edgecombe 

Webster, Gretchen Soph. H.S Leasburg, N. C Caswell 

Weeks, Dorothy Senior H.S Rocky Mount, N. C. . . .Nash 

Wellons, Norma Senior H.S Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Wells, Doris Fresh. H.S. . . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Wells, Elizabeth Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Wells, June M Junior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C . . . . .Pitt 

Wendt, Jean Senior P Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Wescott, Thomas Special Washington, N. C Beaufort 

West, Barbara Anne. . . .Senior H.S. . . .Moyock, N. C Currituck 

West, Lois Fresh. H.S.. . .Roseboro, N. C Sampson 

Westb rook, Alice Grace . .Junior H.S.. . .Raleigh, N. C .Wake 

Westbrook, Calyle Special Wilmington, N. C New Hanover 

Wheless, Martha E Senior H.S Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Whichard, Lindsay Graduate Stokes, N. C Pitt 



List of Students 199 

Name Class Address County 

Whichard, Robert D., Jr. Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

White, Alice Lee Fresh. H.S Edenton, N. C Chowan 

White, Amy Charlotte. . .Senior H.S. . . .Bayboro, N. C Pamlico 

White, Audrey Junior H.S.. . .Poplar Branch, N. C. . .Currituck 

White, Bernice Fresh. G Elizabeth City, N. C. . .Pasquotank 

White, Catherine H Fresh. P Poplar Branch, N. C. . .Currituck 

White, Esther M Fresh. H.S.. . .Belvidere, N. C Perquimans 

White, Hazel Senior H.S.. . .Creswell, N. C Washington 

White, James L Junior H.S.. . .Scotland Neck, N. C. . .Halifax 

White, Johnnie Junior G Belvidere, N. C Perquimans 

White, Lucille Junior P Aulander, N. C Bertie 

White, Marion Fresh. G Hertford, N. C Perquimans 

White, Mary Edith Senior H.S.. . .Portsmouth, Va 

White, Reid Junior H.S Williamston, N. C Martin 

White, Ruby Soph. G Aurora, N. C Beaufort 

Whitehurst, Carl Soph. H.S Greenville,_N. C Pitt 

Whitehurst, Kathleen. . .Junior P Robersonville, N. C. . . .Pitt 

Whitehurst, Lula Mae... Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Whitehurst, Mary Unclassified. . .Gloucester, N. C Carteret 

Whitehurst, Patsy Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Whitfield, Evelyn Soph. H.S Stem, N. C Granville 

Whitford, Annie Junior G Ayden, N. C Pitt 

Whitford, Dallis G Junior H.S.. . .Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Whitlev, Dorothy Soph. P Smithfield, N. C Johnston 

Whitley, Elsie Junior P Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Whitley, Mary Hazel. . . Junior P Raeford, N. C Hoke 

Whitley, Matilda Junior H.S Smithfield, N. C Johnston 

Whitley, Robert B Soph. H.S Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Whitley, Virginia Senior H.S. . . . Nashville, N. C Nash 

Whittington, Minnie M. . Graduate Snow Hill, N. C Greene 

Wicker, Alice Senior P Carthage, N. C Moore 

Wiggins, Alice Fresh. H.S. . . . Sunbury, N. C Gates 

Wiggins, Dorothy Senior H.S. . . .Trotville, N. C Gates 

Wilkerson, Annie Laura . . Senior P Bailey, N. C Nash 

Wilkerson, Edith Special Bailey, N. C Wilson 

Wilkerson, Norman Junior H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Willard, Frances L Unclassified. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Williams, Beatrice G Fresh. H.S. . . . Ayden, N.C Pitt 

Williams, Clara Graduate Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Williams, Doris E Fresh. H.S. . . .Zebulon, N. C Franklin 

Williams, Doris Soph. H.S Kinston, N. C Lenoir 

Williams, Mrs. Dorothy . Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Williams, Eugenia Junior P Gatesville, N. C Gates 

Williams, Jane Senior H.S.. . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Williams, Janie W Fresh. H.S. . . . Angier, N. C Harnett 

Williams, Mrs. K. C Graduate Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Williams, Kathryn Senior P Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

Williams, Margaret B. . . . Senior G Zebulon, N. C Franklin 

Williams, Mrs. Mary N.. Unclassified. . .Kings Mountain, N. C. Cleveland 

Williams, Naomi Junior G Wade, N. C Cumberland 

Williams, Vera Pearl. . . .Fresh. H.S Williamston, N. C Martin 

Williamson, Clara E Soph. P Chadbourn, N.C Columbus 

Williamson, Joyce Fresh. P Lumberton, N. C Robeson 

Williamson, Lois Unclassified. . . Kenansville, N. C Duplin 

Williamson, Melva Junior H.S.. . .Clinton, N. C Sampson 

Williford, Hazel Soph. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Willis, Bonnie Soph. G Oriental, N. C Pamlico 

Willis, Rebecca Fresh. H.S Gloucester, N.C Carteret 



200 East Caeolina Teachers College 

Name Class Address County 

Willoughby, Helen Senior H.S. . . .Kelford, N. C Bertie 

Willoughby, Libby Fresh. H.S Plymouth, N. C Washington 

Wilson, Catherine Fresh. H.S. . . .Dunn, N. C Sampson 

Wilson, Claude W Fresh. H.S. . . . Robersonville, N. C. . .Martin 

Wilson, Dorothy M Soph. H.S Grimesland, N. C Pitt 

Wilson, Helen Earle Senior G Reidsville, N. C Rockingham 

Wilson, Lula Mae Senior H. S Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Wilson, Virginia Soph. P Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Winberry, Frances E. . . .Fresh. H.S. . . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Winbon, Eunice Soph. H.S Fremont, N. C Wayne 

Windley, Mary. Fresh. H.S. . . .Henderson, N. C Vance 

Windley, Pinear M Fresh. H.S Pinetown, N. C Beaufort 

Winesette, Carol Fresh. H.S Whiteville, N. C Columbus 

Winslow, Florence. . . /. .Soph. H.S Belvidere, N. C Perquimans 

Winstead, Betty J Soph. H.S Elm City, N. C Wilson 

Winstead, Geneva Junior G Macclesfield, N. C Edgecombe 

Winston, Lucy Fresh. H.S Knightdale, N. C Wake 

Wise, Margaret Senior H.S Jackson, N. C Northampton 

Wise, Mildred Fresh. H.S Jackson, N. C Northampton 

Wolfe, Helen L Senior H.S Washington, N. C Beaufort 

Womble, Dorothy Fresh. H.S.. . .New Hill, N. C Chatham 

Womble, Mrs. Gladys N. Senior P Winston-Salem, N. C. . . Forsyth 

Womble, Louvene Fresh. H.S.. . .New Hill, N. C Wake 

Wood, Laura F Junior P Four Oaks, N. C Johnston 

Wood, Margaret Hayes . . Soph. H.S Beulaville, N. C Duplin 

Wood, Margaret Lee Senior H.S. . . .Troy, N. C Montgomery 

Wood, Mildred Emily. . . Fresh. H.S Farmville, N. C Greene 

Woodard, Hazel Senior G Kenly, N. C Johnston 

Woodard, Rachel Junior P Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Woodward, Bennett Fresh. H.S Mount Olive, N. C Duplin 

Woody, Floyd Junior H.S.. . . Asheville, N. C Buncombe 

Woolard, Kenneth Special Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Woolard, Mary Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Woolard, Mrs. Varnie D.. Junior P Dardens, N. C Martin 

Wooten, Alvin Soph. H.S Macclesfield, N. C Edgecombe 

Wooten, Atlas Senior H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Wooten, Charlotte Fresh. H.S. . . . Hookerton, N. C Greene 

Wooten, Helen Mae Fresh. P Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Wooten, Louise Fresh. H.S Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Wooten, Mrs. Pearl M.. .Graduate La Grange, N. C Lenoir 

Worley, Virginia Soph. H.S Goldsboro, N. C Wayne 

Worsley, James R., Jr.. .Fresh. H.S.. . .Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Worthington, Nan Graduate Winterville, N. C Pitt 

Wright, Lucille C Senior H.S. . . .Tabor City, N. C Columbus 

Wright, Ruth P Senior P Saint Pauls, N. C Robeson 

Wyckoff, Dorothy Senior H.S Castle Hayne, N. C New Hanover 

Wynne, Nancy Soph. G Bethel, N. C Pitt 

Yelverton, Hazel L Soph. H.S Stantonsburg, N. C. . .Wayne 

Yelverton, Mary Ellen . . . Senior G Farmville, N. C Pitt 

Yelverton, Vivian Fresh. H.S Stantonsburg, N. C Wayne 

Yongue, Jane M Senior H.S Brevard, N. C Transylvania 

Young, Anne F Special Henderson, N. C Vance 

Young, Evelyn Soph. H.S Louisburg, N. C Franklin 

Young, Jack Junior H.S Burnsville, N. C Yancey 

Young, Mary Moss Junior G Willow Spring, N. C Johnston 

Young, Robert Senior H.S Burnsville, N. C Yancey 

Young, Sou Lou Junior H.S Angier, N. C. ...... f , .Harnett 



List of Students 201 

Name Class Address County 

Zaborowski, Ruth Fresh. H.S. . . .Tampa, Fla 

Zahnizer, Oleva Senior P Greenville, N. C Pitt 

Zimmerman, Evelyn .... Fresh. H.S. . . . Danville, Va 

Zuras, Nicholas Junior H.S. . . . High Point, N. C Guilford 



FOR REFERENCE 

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